Lege Artis Medicinae

[Editor’s Response to a Reader Correspondence Reflecting the Article “Health Economics in Hungary: Great Potential, Missed Opportunity?” [2018;28(10):431-438.] ]

NÉMETH Bertalan

DECEMBER 10, 2018

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2018;28(11-12)

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Saluting Semmelweis on the 200th Anniversary of his Birth ]

GAZDA István

Lege Artis Medicinae

[The Nobel Prize in Medicine 2018 ]

KOVÁCS Ferenc

Lege Artis Medicinae

[The Great Acceleration]

BRYS Zoltán

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Mastitis and breastfeeding]

UNGVÁRY Renáta, MIKÓ-BARÁTH Eszter, KISS Eleonóra

[Various degrees of mastitis affect a significant percentage of breastfeeding mothers. Prevention and effective treatment are important public health issues due to the severe pain, malaise, high fever, and possible complications. Among other causes for early termination of breastfeeding, the most prominent reasons are the pain, prolonged healing, abscess due to mastitis and the frequent recurrence of the disease. Proper management of mastitis and alleviating the symptoms influence the length of breastfeeding and hence leads to a positive outcome for both the mother’s and her child’s long term health. Nevertheless, there are inconsistencies worldwide regarding the diagnosis, cure and prevention of mastitis. The treatments are done mostly on empirical basis. Even though numerous articles have been published on the subject, the unequivocal results are yet to come. This overview summarizes the current knowledge and the dilemmas about mastitis as well as the prevention opportunities and therapies. It also discusses the new results on breastmilk microbiome research, which might change the approach towards mastitis treatment.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Modalities of the therapy of patients with high cardiovascular risk]

FARSANG Csaba

[International and Hungarian guidelines emphasize the need of the combinations in the therapy of hypertension. Single pill combinations (SPC) are preferred. The importance of the treatment reducing cardiovascular risk is underlined by the fact that in most hypertensive patients other cardiovascular risk factors, among them most frequently dyslipidemia is present. In addition to antihypertensive drugs these patients should be treated also with those decreasing plasma lipids. Adherence / persistence to therapy of patients is greatly improved by the use of single pill combinations. Today we also have SPCs decreasing both, blood pressure and plasma lipids. Among them there is the combination containing amlodipine and atorvastatin. Several international and Hungarian clinical studies have been conducted. Results of these investigations have been described in several publications. In this paper I summarise the most important results of some of these studies. ]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Lege Artis Medicinae

[The author’s response to the comment on “Exploratory study of outcomes of blood sample mass examinations by rank correlations”]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Comment to the article titled “Exploratory study of outcomes of blood sample mass examinations by rank correlations”]

Clinical Neuroscience

[What happens to vertiginous population after emission from the Emergency Department?]

MAIHOUB Stefani, MOLNÁR András, CSIKÓS András, KANIZSAI Péter, TAMÁS László, SZIRMAI Ágnes

[Background – Dizziness is one of the most frequent complaints when a patient is searching for medical care and resolution. This can be a problematic presentation in the emergency department, both from a diagnostic and a management standpoint. Purpose – The aim of our study is to clarify what happens to patients after leaving the emergency department. Methods – 879 patients were examined at the Semmel­weis University Emergency Department with vertigo and dizziness. We sent a questionnaire to these patients and we had 308 completed papers back (110 male, 198 female patients, mean age 61.8 ± 12.31 SD), which we further analyzed. Results – Based on the emergency department diagnosis we had the following results: central vestibular lesion (n = 71), dizziness or giddiness (n = 64) and BPPV (n = 51) were among the most frequent diagnosis. Clarification of the final post-examination diagnosis took several days (28.8%), and weeks (24.2%). It was also noticed that 24.02% of this population never received a proper diagnosis. Among the population only 80 patients (25.8%) got proper diagnosis of their complaints, which was supported by qualitative statistical analysis (Cohen Kappa test) result (κ = 0.560). Discussion – The correlation between our emergency department diagnosis and final diagnosis given to patients is low, a phenomenon that is also observable in other countries. Therefore, patient follow-up is an important issue, including the importance of neurotology and possibly neurological examination. Conclusion – Emergency diagnosis of vertigo is a great challenge, but despite of difficulties the targeted and quick case history and exact examination can evaluate the central or peripheral cause of the balance disorder. Therefore, to prevent declination of the quality of life the importance of further investigation is high.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The connection between the socioeconomic status and stroke in Budapest]

VASTAGH Ildikó, SZŐCS Ildikó, OBERFRANK Ferenc, AJTAY András, BERECZKI Dániel

[The well-known gap bet­ween stroke mortality of Eastern and Western Euro­pean countries may reflect the effect of socioeconomic diffe­rences. Such a gap may be present between neighborhoods of different wealth within one city. We set forth to compare age distribution, incidence, case fatality, mortality, and risk factor profile of stroke patients of the poorest (District 8) and wealthiest (District 12) districts of Budapest. We synthesize the results of our former comparative epidemiological investigations focusing on the association of socioeconomic background and features of stroke in two districts of the capital city of Hungary. The “Budapest District 8–12 project” pointed out the younger age of stroke patients of the poorer district, and established that the prevalence of smoking, alcohol-consumption, and untreated hypertension is also higher in District 8. The “Six Years in Two Districts” project involving 4779 patients with a 10-year follow-up revealed higher incidence, case fatality and mortality of stroke in the less wealthy district. The younger patients of the poorer region show higher risk-factor prevalence, die younger and their fatality grows faster during long-term follow-up. The higher prevalence of risk factors and the higher fatality of the younger age groups in the socioeconomically deprived district reflect the higher vulnerability of the population in District 8. The missing link between poverty and stroke outcome seems to be lifestyle risk-factors and lack of adherence to primary preventive efforts. Public health campaigns on stroke prevention should focus on the young generation of socioeconomi­cally deprived neighborhoods. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The Comprehensive Aphasia Test in Hungarian]

ZAKARIÁS Lilla, RÓZSA Sándor, LUKÁCS Ágnes

[In this paper we present the Comprehensive Aphasia Test-Hungarian (CAT-H; Zakariás and Lukács, in preparation), an assessment tool newly adapted to Hungarian, currently under standardisation. The test is suitable for the assessment of an acquired language disorder, post-stroke aphasia. The aims of this paper are to present 1) the main characteristics of the test, its areas of application, and the process of the Hungarian adaptation and standardisation, 2) the first results from a sample of Hungarian people with aphasia and healthy controls. Ninety-nine people with aphasia, mostly with unilateral, left hemisphere stroke, and 19 neurologically intact control participants were administered the CAT-H. In addition, we developed a questionnaire assessing demographic and clinical information. The CAT-H consists of two parts, a Cognitive Screening Test and a Language Test. People with aphasia performed significantly worse than the control group in all language and almost all cognitive subtests of the CAT-H. Consistent with our expectations, the control group performed close to ceiling in all subtests, whereas people with aphasia exhibited great individual variability both in the language and the cognitive subtests. In addition, we found that age, time post-onset, and type of stroke were associated with cognitive and linguistic abilities measured by the CAT-H. Our results and our experiences clearly show that the CAT-H provides a comprehensive profile of a person’s impaired and intact language abilities and can be used to monitor language recovery as well as to screen for basic cognitive deficits in aphasia. We hope that the CAT-H will be a unique resource for rehabilitation professionals and aphasia researchers in aphasia assessment and diagnostics in Hungary. ]