Lege Artis Medicinae

[Diseases of the kidneys due to non-cancer mortality characteristics of Hungary between 2005-2014]

PAKSY András, KISS István

FEBRUARY 12, 2017

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2017;27(01-02)

[The authors review the time of 10 years between 2005-2014 concerning the development of the mortality rate of kidney diseases in Hungary. They’ve compared the Hungarian mortality data with the ones from three other countries, namely Austria, the Czech Republic and Germany. The analyses included kidney diseases originated from hypertension, glomerulonephritis and tubulointerstitial kidney diseases, kidney failure and polycystic kidney diseases. They weren’t concerned about kidney tumors or diabetes originated kidney diseases because of the lack of data concerning the latter. The mortality data were retrieved from the KSH Demography Yearbook and the European Detailed Mortality Data-base (DMDB). The statistically examined causes of death only add up to 1.2% of the total causes of death, but with the aging of the population this proportion will surely grow. During the last 10 years, the mortality of cardiovascular diseases decreased significantly, namely the mortality of ischaemic heart disease and stroke, but the mortality of hypertension increased. These processes can also be seen in Austria, the Czech Republic and Germany. The mortality connected to primal kidney diseases decisively concerns people aged over 70. The glomerular diseases’ standardized rate is significantly higher in Hungary than in the compared countries. The tubulointerstitial kidney diseases’ mortality rate decreased over the last 10 years and we are in the middle of the international field in this regard. During the evaluation of the mortality of kidney diseases it is important to consider that in the statistics every death can only have one cause nominated, which can be (correctly) the basic disease causing the kidney disease or in other cases the kidney disease itself. This problem makes it more difficult to compare data internationally. Only 20-30 patients die of acute kidney disease on a yearly basis which is a low mortality rate even by international standards but the above-mentioned problem still exists. Of all of them the chronic kidney disease is the most significant one and between 2005-2014 the number of deaths and their rate connected to it decreased, but with the aging of the population the morbidity of kidney diseases will surely increase. Analyzing the data of all the primer kidney diseases it can be determined that between 2005-2014 the mortality rate showed a decreasing tendency, so our international situation can be viewed positively. It is important to note though that the mortality of this disease type includes patients of lower average age in Hungary than in the more developed countries. The mortality rate of polycystic kidney disease hasn’t changed significantly during the past 10 years. Although some patients live to many years, the average age of the dead is significantly lower compared to the ones of other kidney disease types. The cases below the age of 1 year of the latter add up to 10%. The comparison between the countries concerning the po­lycystic kidney disease shows that the standardized mortality rate is higher in Hun­gary.]

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