Lege Artis Medicinae

[Diseased or Possessed?]

BÁNFALVI Attila

SEPTEMBER 19, 2007

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2007;17(08-09)

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Further articles in this publication

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Extended treatment for hepatitis C type-1: comparing 48 versus 72 weeks of peginterferon-alpha-2a plus ribavirin]

NEMESÁNSZKY Elemér

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Oncohematology in the focus - Reader’s questions answered by dr. Judit Demeter]

DEMETER Judit

Lege Artis Medicinae

[From Madhouses to Psychiatric Hospitals Mental Health Institutions in Hungary]

KAPRONCZAY Károly

Lege Artis Medicinae

[ANALYIS OF MOTIVATIONS OF SMOKING CESSATION]

SUSÁNSZKY Éva, SZÁNTÓ Zsuzsa, KOPP Mária

[INTRODUCTION - The aim of the study was to explore the differences in motivations between successful quitters and smokers who just consider quitting. Self-reported motivations of exsmokers' smoking cessation and the reasoning of current smokers who consider quitting were analyzed. SUBJECTS AND METHODS - The study is based on Hungarostudy Health Panel conducted in 2005, which is the second wave of Hungarostudy 2002, a national representative health survey of the adult Hungarian population. Of the subjects involved in this follow-up study, data from 3701 persons could be analyzed. RESULTS - About half of the respondents had never smoked, one fifth of them had quitted and 28 percent smoked. More than half of the current smokers (52%) contemplated on giving up smoking. Among ex-smokers and contemplating current smokers alike (38-40%), disease prevention was mentioned as the single most important reason of cessation. Financial reasons were mostly mentioned by current smokers; ex-smokers were more likely to explain their decision with deteriorating health, the occurrence of certain diseases. Among these, cardio-vascular morbidity played the most important role in smoking cessation while cancers, respiratory disease and diabetes also significantly increased the odds of quitting. Social pressure was a reason for quitting mostly among women and elderly persons. Among current smokers, those living in partner relationship and the better-off tended to entertain thoughts of quitting because of social pressure. CONCLUSION - The results confirm the importance of cardiovascular diseases in smoking cessation: although people emphasize primary preventive purposes of their cessation efforts, in fact secondary prevention, i.e., existing circulatory and heart problems play the major role both in actual cessation and in quitting considerations.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[ANTIHYPERTENSIVE THERAPY IN VIEW OF RECENT CLINICAL STUDIES]

ALFÖLDI Sándor

[Different antihypertensive agents, while having the same blood pressure lowering effect, will have significantly and clinically important different impact on the serum levels of glucose, lipids, insulin, potassium, creatinine, as well as on albumin excretion, heart rate, body weight, central pressure, various hypertensive target organ damages, and, in particular, 24-hour blood pressure dinamics. There is agreement in that the main benefits of first-line antihypertensive agents are related to the lowering of blood pressure itself. Some other drugs, however, have shown preventive and protective cardiovascular properties in certain patient groups, independent of their blood pressure lowering effect as measured traditionally.]

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[A clear understanding of the pathogenic events and/or environmental conditions that lead to the development of rheumatoid arthritis has not been accomplished. In recent years, some of the most capable therapies have targeted individual proteins, such as proinflammatory cytokines, which contribute to persistent inflammation. The success of these therapies in some patients underscores the importance of having a solid pathophysiologic knowledge of the mechanisms at play in the diseased joint. Targeting the joint therapeutically with proteins or other agents has presented many challenges in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. To circumvent these obstacles, the idea of providing transgenes to cells of the synovial lining was born. This use of gene therapy, as a delivery vehicle rather than replacement of a genetic deficit, has had many successes in preclinical animal studies. Preliminary results of the first Phase I clinical trial in humans suggests that an ex vivo approach can be safe and enable transgene expression. This review provides a consolidated overview of many of the successful gene therapy strategies undertaken for the treatment of animal models of arthritis. The focus is on: 1. joint targeting strategies, including discussion on the local and systemic approaches as well as the contralateral joint; 2. the applicability of viral vectors, including comparison of adenoviral, retroviral, adeno-associated, and herpes simplex viruses; 3. timing and dosage of treatment; and 4. targets and candidate proteins that have been examined, including targeting proinflammatory cytokines or the use of anti-inflammatory cytokines.]

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