Lege Artis Medicinae

[Depression from the aspect of polygenic studies: the role of the relationship between genes and the environment]

GONDA Xénia

JANUARY 20, 2018

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2018;28(01-02)

[Depression is a multifactorial disease with both genes and environmental factors as well as complex relationships between these factors playing a role in its background. However, in spite of several decades of research no genetic variants playing a straightforward and robust role in the background of depression have been identified. One reason behind this is the genetic and biological heterogeneity of depression, while another is that in the majority of studies environmental effects interacting with genetic variants have not been considered which may mask important genetic effects. Furthermore, relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors may vary in case of different manifestations and subtypes of depression which has not only etiopathological relevance but may also influence choice and efficiency of treatment. Consideration of heterogeneity of depressive syndromes, as well as environmental effects in case of both candidate gene and whole genome association studies, and qualitative analysis of environmental effects in depression and antidepressant research may extend our existing knowledge concerning the pathophysiology of depression and may also aid identification of new antidepressive therapeutic targets. ]

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