Lege Artis Medicinae

[Deep brain stimulation: a breakthrought in the treatment of movement disorders]

KOVÁCS Norbert1, BALÁS István2, LLUMIGUANO Carlos2, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna1, NAGY Ferenc1, JANSZKY József1, DÓCZI Tamás2, KOMOLY Sámuel1

FEBRUARY 20, 2009

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2009;19(02)

[Over the last 20 years, it became clear that deep brain stimulation is a breakthrough in the treatment of drug-resistant movement disorders. Stimulation acts by functional inhibition of certain pathologically hyperactive nuclei. Of advantage is that the patient himself can change stimulation parameters depending on his actual status, thus reaching optimal quality of life. This option has been available for years in Hungary, as well. It is a safe, effective and cost-effective alternative in the symptomatic management of drug-refractory Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and primary dystonia. Before surgery, a comprehensive investigation including clinical diagnosis, severity, surgery contraindications, and expected benefit has to be performed. Based on the results of international multicenter studies, bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation may improve - besides symptoms, such as tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia and levodopa-induced side effects - also quality of life in Parkinson’s disease. In essential tremor, stimulation of the ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus is capable of spectacularly decreasing tremor. For primary dystonias, stimulation of the pallidum can improve drug-resistant symptoms and quality of life, and it substantially reduces social dependency and the amount of nursing required. In childhood dystonias, surgery may be performed at an age of as low as seven years.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Pécsi Tudományegyetem, Neurológiai Klinika, Pécs
  2. Pécsi Tudományegyetem, Idegsebészeti Klinika, Pécs

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[Ankylosing spondylitis is an inflammatory rheumatic disease characterized by inflammation of the spinal and sacroiliacal joints, which causes chronic back pain and ultimately spinal stiffness, impaired motility, and deformity. Until the last decade, treatment mainly consisted of a combination of physical therapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but recently tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors revolutionized therapy and improved clinical outcomes. Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors effectively control inflammation of the sacroiliacal and spinal joints as shown by improved signs symptoms, and functions, magnetic resonance imaging findings, and reduction of acute phase reactants. Whether these drugs are capable of preventing radiographic progression and structural damage has, however, to be clarified in future studies. This review aims to highlight recent progress in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis, and to provide recommendations for its management.]

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