Lege Artis Medicinae

[Competency list of the general practice, 2005]

KRAMER Imre

SEPTEMBER 15, 2006

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2006;16(08-09)

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Lege Artis Medicinae

[A new simple tool for tonometric determination of the pCO2 in the gastrointestinal tract]

BODA Domokos, TÁLOSI Gyula, KASZAKI József

Lege Artis Medicinae

[STATE-OF-THE-ART DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF PITUITARY ADENOMAS SECRETING GROWTH HORMONE]

CZIRJÁK Sándor

[The history of the treatment of pituitary adenomas that cause acromegaly is as long as that of neurosurgery. While in the first half of the past century the aim of surgery was to save the patient's life, later the radical removal of the tumour was coupled with an effort to decrease complications, morbidity and mortality to the minimum. Today, beside all these, the complete sparing of the remaining hypophyseal substance and restoration of normal pituitary function are also important goals. The achievement of these goals is efficiently served by recent advances in microscopy, the minimally invasive methods of craniotomy, the availability of endoscopy in neurosurgery, three-dimensional computerguided neuronavigation, intraoperative colour Doppler sonography, as well as intraoperative real-time MRI. Recent developments in pharmacological research have created new promising conservative treatment modalities that supplement surgery, including somatostatin analogues and growth hormone receptor agonists. Also as supplementary treatment to surgery, occasionally replacing it, new radiosurgical methods, such as stereotaxic radiation, gamma knife, and heavy particle irradiation have gained grounds in neurosurgical practice.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[BRONCHUS ASSOCIATED LYMPHOID TISSUE LYMPHOMA]

HERTEL Katalin, ZSIRAY Miklós, SOLTÉSZ Ibolya

[INTRODUCTION - Primary lymphomas rarely occur in the lung. CASE REPORT - The authors present the case of an asymptomatic 61-year-old man. The patient was identified on routine chest X-ray having a streak infiltrate in the upper lobe of the right lung, which did not respond to antibiotics. On histological examination of the bronchoscopic specimen BALT- (bronchus associated lymphoid tissue) lymphoma was presumed. Since staging showed the disease to be localized, lobectomy was performed. The patient is symptom-free 16 months after surgery and there is no relapse. CONCLUSION - Although BALT-lymphomas are of low-grade malignancy in most of the cases, relapses can develop in the original organ or in other extra-nodal locations years later and BALTlymphomas may also transform into large-cell lymphomas of more aggressive behaviour.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[DIAGNOSIS, DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF HYPERPROLACTINAEMIA]

IVÁN Gabriella, GÓTH Miklós

[Hyperprolactinaemia is one of the most common endocrine diseases. Besides hypothyroidism- associated hyperprolactinaemia and that arising as a side effect of certain drugs, the most common cause of hyperprolactinaemia is a pituitary microadenoma (<10 mm in diameter) or macroadenoma (≥10 mm) that produces prolactin (prolactinoma). In addition, several physiological conditions can elevate (mostly temporarily) the serum prolactin level, therefore, setting up the precise diagnosis requires careful evaluation of the patient’s history and the laboratory, clinical, and imaging findings. Moreover, macroprolactinaemia, which is usually not a pituitary tumour-related disease, should also be ruled out. Prolactinomas represent the most common form of functioning pituitary adenomas, accounting for 30-40% of such tumours. The typical clinical symptoms of hyperprolactinaemia may be modulated by the mass effect of macroadenomas. In women the disease typically manifests as menstrual disturbance of various degree, including primary or secondary amenorrhoea, oligomenorrhoea, short luteal phase, infertility and galactorrhoea. In men reduced libido, impotence, infertility, gynaecomastia and, rarely, galactorrhoea are the typical symptoms. Dopamine agonist therapy is the first choice of treatment. Dopamine agonist therapy (bromocriptine and the recently developed quinagolide and cabergoline) successfully lowers the serum prolactine level in nearly 90% of cases, and, importantly, it also reduces the size of the tumour in the majority of cases. This explains why today surgery and radiotherapy are only used in rare special cases of prolactinoma.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[BREAST CANCER CARE: FROM PREVENTION TO SURVEILLANCE]

KAHÁN Zsuzsanna

[Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women in developed countries. The development of most breast cancers is related to various hormonal effects, while 10% is associated with inherited gene mutations. Most of the primary prevention methods aim at decreasing the effects of hormones, but education on proper lifestyle is also an important risk-lowering method. The primary treatment of early breast cancer is usually breast-conserving surgery, either with the targeted removal of regional lymph nodes (by sentinel lymph node labelling) or with axillary block-dissection. The aim of postoperative radiotherapy is the eradication of the tumour cells left behind. Beside the locoregional tumour control this also plays a role in the prevention of recurrence or a secondary systemic dissemination. Adjuvant systemic treatments are used for the eradication of disseminated microscopic tumour foci. The use of modern adjuvant treatments may reduce death from the disease by up to 50%. The risks of relapse or death may be estimated based on established prognostic factors. While in low-risk patients it is not worth starting medical treatment, especially in view of the side effects, while in other cases chemo- or hormonal therapy may save the patient's life. The choice of the medical treatment should also depend on the patient's general health, the concomittant diseases and her preferences. The collaboration of the various specialists involved in the care of breast cancer patients can best take place at specialised breast centres that are equipped with the necessary technical basis, knowledge and professional experience.]

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VASAS Lívia, GEGES József

[Three decades ago, LAM was launched with the goal of providing scientific information about medicine and its frontiers. From the very beginning, LAM has also concerned a special subject area while connecting medicine with the world of art. In the palette of medical articles, it remained a special feature to this day. The analysis of the history of LAM to date was performed using internationally accepted publication guidelines and scientific databases as a pledge of objectivity. We examined the practice of LAM if it meets the main criteria, the professional expectations of our days, when publishing contents of the traditional printed edition and its electronic version. We explored the visibility of articles in the largest bibliographic and scientific metric databases, and reviewed the LAM's place among the Hun­ga­rian professional journals. Our results show that in recent years LAM has gained international reputation des­pite publishing in Hungarian spoken by a few people. This is due to articles with foreign co-authors as well as references to LAM in articles written exclusively by foreign researchers. The journal is of course full readable in the Hungarian bibliographic databases, and its popularity is among the leading ones. The great virtue of the journal is the wide spectrum of the authors' affiliation, with which they cover almost completely the Hungarian health care institutional sys­tem. The special feature of its columns is enhanced by the publication of writings on art, which may increase Hungarian and foreign interest like that of medical articles.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Second game, 37th move and Fourth game 78th move]

VOKÓ Zoltán

[What has Go to do with making clinical decisions? One of the greatest intellectual challenges of bedside medicine is making decisions under uncertainty. Besides the psychological traps of traditionally intuitive and heuristic medical decision making, lack of information, scarce resources and characteristics of doctor-patient relationship contribute equally to this uncertainty. Formal, mathematical model based analysis of decisions used widely in developing clinical guidelines and in health technology assessment provides a good tool in theoretical terms to avoid pitfalls of intuitive decision making. Nevertheless it can be hardly used in individual situations and most physicians dislike it as well. This method, however, has its own limitations, especially while tailoring individual decisions, under inclusion of potential lack of input data used for calculations, or its large imprecision, and the low capability of the current mathematical models to represent the full complexity and variability of processes in complex systems. Nevertheless, clinical decision support systems can be helpful in the individual decision making of physicians if they are well integrated in the health information systems, and do not break down the physicians’ autonomy of making decisions. Classical decision support systems are knowledge based and rely on system of rules and problem specific algorithms. They are utilized widely from health administration to image processing. The current information revolution created the so-called artificial intelligence by machine learning methods, i.e. machines can learn indeed. This new generation of artificial intelligence is not based on particular system of rules but on neuronal networks teaching themselves by huge databases and general learning algorithms. This type of artificial intelligence outperforms humans already in certain fields like chess, Go, or aerial combat. Its development is full of challenges and threats, while it presents a technological breakthrough, which cannot be stopped and will transform our world. Its development and application has already started also in the healthcare. Health professionals must participate in this development to steer it into the right direction. Lee Sedol, 18-times Go world champion retired three years after his historical defeat from AlphaGo artificial intelligence, be­cause “Even if I become the No. 1, there is an entity that cannot be defeated”. It is our great luck that we do not need to compete or defeat it, we must ensure instead that it would be safe and trustworthy, and in collaboration with humans this entity would make healthcare more effective and efficient. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

The etiology and age-related properties of patients with delirium in coronary intensive care unit and its effects on inhospital and follow up prognosis

ALTAY Servet, GÜRDOGAN Muhammet, KAYA Caglar, KARDAS Fatih, ZEYBEY Utku, CAKIR Burcu, EBIK Mustafa, DEMIR Melik

Delirium is a syndrome frequently encountered in intensive care and associated with a poor prognosis. Intensive care delirium is mostly based on general and palliative intensive care data in the literature. In this study, we aimed to investigate the incidence of delirium in coronary intensive care unit (CICU), related factors, its relationship with inhospital and follow up prognosis, incidence of age-related delirium and its effect on outcomes. This study was conducted with patients hospitalized in CICU of a tertiary university hospital between 01 August 2017 and 01 August 2018. Files of all patients were examined in details, and demographic, clinic and laboratory parameters were recorded. Patients confirmed with psychiatry consultation were included in the groups of patients who developed delirium. Patients were divided into groups with and without delirium developed, and baseline features, inhospital and follow up prognoses were investigated. In addition, patients were divided into four groups as <65 years old, 65-75 yo, 75-84 yo and> 85 yo, and the incidence of delirium, related factors and prognoses were compared among these groups. A total of 1108 patients (mean age: 64.4 ± 13.9 years; 66% men) who were followed in the intensive care unit with variable indications were included in the study. Of all patients 11.1% developed delirium in the CICU. Patients who developed delirium were older, comorbidities were more frequent, and these patients showed increased inflammation findings, and significant increase in inhospital mortality compared to those who did not develop delirium (p<0.05). At median 9-month follow up period, rehospitalization, reinfarction, cognitive dysfunction, initiation of psychiatric therapy and mortality were significantly higher in the delirium group (p<0.05). When patients who developed delirium were divided into four groups by age and analyzed, incidence of delirium and mortality rate in delirium group were significantly increased by age (p<0.05). Development of delirium in coronary intensive care unit is associated with increased inhospital and follow up morbidity and mortality. Delirium is more commonly seen in geriatric patients and those with comorbidity, and is associated with a poorer prognosis. High-risk patients should be more carefully monitored for the risk of delirium.

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[Advanced Parkinson’s disease characteristics in clinical practice: Results from the OBSERVE-PD study and sub-analysis of the Hungarian data]

TAKÁTS Annamária, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, VÉCSEI László, KLIVÉNYI Péter, DÉZSI Lívia, ZÁDORI Dénes, VALIKOVICS Attila, VARANNAI Lajos, ONUK Koray, KINCZEL Beatrix, KOVÁCS Norbert

[The majority of patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease are treated at specialized movement disorder centers. Currently, there is no clear consensus on how to define the stages of Parkinson’s disease; the proportion of Parkinson’s patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease, the referral process, and the clinical features used to characterize advanced Parkinson’s disease are not well delineated. The primary objective of this observational study was to evaluate the proportion of Parkinson’s patients identified as advanced patients according to physician’s judgment in all participating movement disorder centers across the study. Here we evaluate the Hungarian subset of the participating patients. The study was conducted in a cross-sectional, non-interventional, multi-country, multi-center format in 18 countries. Data were collected during a single patient visit. Current Parkinson’s disease status was assessed with Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) parts II, III, IV, and V (modified Hoehn and Yahr staging). Non-motor symptoms were assessed using the PD Non-motor Symptoms Scale (NMSS); quality of life was assessed with the PD 8-item Quality-of-Life Questionnaire (PDQ-8). Parkinson’s disease was classified as advanced versus non-advanced based on physician assessment and on questions developed by the Delphi method. Overall, 2627 patients with Parkinson’s disease from 126 sites were documented. In Hungary, 100 patients with Parkinson’s disease were documented in four movement disorder centers, and, according to the physician assessment, 50% of these patients had advanced Parkinson’s disease. Their mean scores showed significantly higher impairment in those with, versus without advanced Parkinson’s disease: UPDRS II (14.1 vs. 9.2), UPDRS IV Q32 (1.1 vs. 0.0) and Q39 (1.1 vs. 0.5), UPDRS V (2.8 vs. 2.0) and PDQ-8 (29.1 vs. 18.9). Physicians in Hungarian movement disorder centers assessed that half of the Parkinson’s patients had advanced disease, with worse motor and non-motor symptom severity and worse QoL than those without advanced Parkinson’s disease. Despite being classified as eligible for invasive/device-aided treatment, that treatment had not been initiated in 25% of these patients.]

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[Family planning in multiple sclerosis: conception, pregnancy, breastfeeding]

RÓZSA Csilla

[Family planning is an exceptionally important question in multiple sclerosis, as women of childbearing age are the ones most often affected. Although it is proven that pregnancy does not worsen the long-term prognosis of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, many patients are still doubtful about having children. This question is further complicated by the fact that patients – and often even doctors – are not sufficiently informed about how the ever-increasing number of available disease-modifying treatments affect pregnancies. Breastfeeding is an even less clear topic. Patients usually look to their neurologists first for answers concerning these matters. It falls to the neurologist to rationally evaluate the risks and benefits of contraception, pregnancy, assisted reproduction, childbirth, breastfeeding and disease modifying treatments, to inform patients about these, and then together come to a decision about the best possible therapeutic approach, taking the patients’ individual family plans into consideration. Here we present a review of relevant literature adhering to international guidelines on the topics of conception, pregnancy and breastfeeding, with a special focus on the applicability of approved disease modifying treatments during pregnancy and breastfeeding. The goal of this article is to provide clinicians involved in the care of MS patients with up-to-date information that they can utilize in their day-to-day clinical practice. ]