Lege Artis Medicinae

[Classical methods in modern approach. Training for the recognition of emotions using bibliotherapy-techniques]

SZABÓ József, SIPOS Mária

JANUARY 20, 2018

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2018;28(01-02)

[BACKGROUND - Nowadays it is an understood fact, that theory of mind has a great psychological significance. Deficits of theory of mind skills are observed in schizophrenia such as depression, dementia, autism and some personality disorders as well. Conceptions of theory of mind and emotion recognition ability have been coming in front at the expanse of the older empathy also in the present-day research in connection with helper connections and their effects. It is probably due to popular approach of cognitive neuroscience exact methods. METHODS - We intended to demonstrate, that the ability of emotion recognition can be developed, or partially restored, even in case of patients suffering from schizophrenia. We compiled an 8-seat training. Our method was a bibliotherapy training, each of chosen novels expressed one of basic emotions (by Ekman). After a common reading we projected validated portraits expressing also those emotions. Participants had to choose reflecting the emotional state of the characters photos. Then they shared stories from their own lives experiencing similar emotions. We measured the effectiveness of our method by the Reading the Mind in the Eyes measured (RMET) test. RESULTS - Comparing data before and after the training in t-test we detected significant difference (p=0.000608 <0.05). Verifying that the observed changes are not only the common effects of the other types of treatment, the same tests were performed on a similar in-patient treated control group. There was no significant difference between the RMET first time and two weeks later values of the control group (p=0.467). The rate of changes in the test and control group (RMET) was compared in a paired-sample t-test, and we also found a significant difference: p=0.000786 <0.005. CONCLUSIONS - The deficit of theory of mind in schizophrenia can be reduced, which indirectly can improve our patients' communication and adaptation skills, or worse, their deterioration can be reduced.]

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