Lege Artis Medicinae

[BIVENTRICULAR PACING - A NEW TREATMENT OPTION IN CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE]

BŐHM Ádám

SEPTEMBER 20, 2005

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2005;15(08-09)

[Cardiac resynchronisation therapy with biventricular pacing is a new treatment option in patients with moderate-to-advanced heart failure and left bundle branch block. Cardiac resynchronisation therapy leads to improved haemodynamics at diminished energy cost. Beneficial effects include reverse remodelling resulting in decreased heart size and ventricular volumes, improved ejection fraction and decreased functional mitral regurgitation. The haemodynamic improvements are associated with a significantly better quality of life, improved exercise tolerance and less frequent hospitalisation. Several randomised trials have evaluated the short- and longterm effect of biventricular pacing on haemodynamics and clinical parameters and recent preliminary data suggest that cardiac resynchronisation therapy can reduce the mortality. Despite major advances of lead and pacemaker techniques, the implantation of a biventricular pacemaker is still a challenging and complex procedure. To introduce the left ventricular pacing lead into the sinus coronarius may cause difficulties. Approximately one third of the patients do not respond to the therapy, therefore better pre-implant identification of the responders are needed. For patient selection and follow- up echocardiography has a major role.]

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[INTRODUCTION - Marital stress and depression have proved to be independent biopsychosocial risk factors for cardiovascular disorders. At the same time their interaction increases cardiovascular vulnerability. The Stockholm Female Coronary Risk Study has shown that marital stress was statistically significantly associated with depressive symptoms, in both groups of healthy women and in patients, even after adjusting for age, educational level, menopausal status, body mass index, cigarette smoking, sedentary lifestyle and the severity of heart failure. METHODS - The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of marital stress on depressive symptoms and psychosocial vulnerability in women with coronary heart disease and in healthy women, cohabiting and currently working. Data were obtained from the Hungarostudy 2002, representing the Hungarian population over the age of 18, according to age, sex and county. RESULTS - The results have shown that an increase in marital stress contributes to an increase in psychosocial vulnerability (depression, anxiety, vital exhaustion, sleep complaints) in healthy women and in women with cardiovascular disorders as well. Higher depression has been related with higher marital stress as well. DISCUSSION - The relation between marital stress and depression seems to be independent from socio-cultural, economical differences: the same results have been found in Hungarian and Swedish women. This relation seems to be bidirectional: a bad marriage increases the prevalence rate of depressive symptoms and depression worsens marital quality. At the end we propose a conceptual framework for how marital stress and depression increases cardiovascular vulnerability in women, emphasizing circular causality.]

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[The authors describe the basic ideas of travel medicine, as a newly introduced interdiscipline of the medical science in Hungary. Recently, this segment is considered to be the part of Insurance Medicine, on the other hand the methods and the practice of the travel medicine is based on the other medical specialities’ knowledge. Due to the growing number of travellers in our country as well as the consequences of the joining Hungary to EU, travel medicine could play an important role in the improvement of the Hungarian travellers’ attitude to their health care status, the prevention against the emerged infectious diseases, and in the medical assistance for the international tourism. Travel medicine also a good guideline for the fit-for-travel considerations, made by the GPs. Hungary with its advantageous geographical position appears to be an excellent stopover for any medical evacuation from East European or other surrounding countries. That is why we would like to establish a first travel medicine facility in central Europe. It is expectable that the Hungarian travellers require more and more information regarding to their health care possibilities and prevention during their trip. The first authentic person is being asked by the patients’ are GPs. The GP’s tasks are: diagnosis and the treatment of travel related diseases, the pre-travel advices. All the mentioned factors are a new challenge for the GPs in Hungary.]

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