Lege Artis Medicinae

[Bacteriophage therapy and prophylaxis; Renewal of earlier expectations]

MILCH Hedda1

SEPTEMBER 01, 2000

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2000;10(09)

[Bacteriophages were discovered 84 years ago by the observation of a lysis of a bacterial culture. The aim of the earliest attempts was the therapeutic employment of bacteriophages. The experiments controlled unsatisfactorily, could not fulfill expecations and successful antibiotic testing resulted the rejection of bacteriophage therapy. Bacteriophages gained importance in biology in the 1950s, as model viruses in biological and genetic research. The decrease in the success of antibiotic therapy caused to renew efforts in experimental phage therapy. The author reviews the early studies carried out mainly on animals as well as human experiments with bacteriophages purified by genetic methods. According to the results, bacteriophage therapy may be effective under certain circumstances for the infections not treatable by antibiotics, and in the case of antiobiotic-susceptible bacteria it can supplement therapy.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Johan Béla Országos Epidemiológiai Központ Fágtipizáló és Molekuláris Epidemiológiai Osztály, Budapest

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Newly discovered molecules the chemokines]

KŐHIDAI László, DÉRFALVY Beáta

[Chemokine research in the last decade has provided new results in several areas of biomedicine. Investigation and characterization of chemokines resulted in better understanding and modeling complex pathophysiological and immunological processes. Chemokine research opened up entirely new aspects on the defense against pathogenic agents as well as on the processes of inflammation and angiogenesis. With the amount of clinical data growing steadily, it is clear that chemokines could play very important role not only in solving the problems of the oretical and experimental biology but also with their application in clinical diagnostics and therapy. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Heparin in Acute Embolic Stroke Trial]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Effect of calcium channel blocking drugs on the periodontal status of hospitalised patients]

KEGLEVICH Tibor, ZSIDRÓ Emese, BENEDEK Erika, BARNA István, SZEGEDI Zsolt, SCHWAB E. Richárd, GERA István

[Ca2+-channel blockers play crucial role in the chronic treatment of hypertension and cardiac arrhythmia. One of the side effects of the chronic nifedipine treatment is gingival enlargement. The pathomechanism of this side effect is not fully understood. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the potential role of different factors in the development and severity of gingival hyperplasia. The incidence and severity of gingival enlargement were examined around the six surfaces of all fully erupted teeth in 243 hospitalized patients with the modified Angelopoulus-Goaz Gingival Hyperplasia Index. 172 patients in the study group were on Ca2+ channel blockers for at least three months prior to the examination while 71 inpatients served as controls. Gingival hyperplasia occurred in 87% of the test group and in 53% of the control group. Severe gingival enlargement occurred in 35% in the test group and only in 2% of the control group. The age and gender of the patient, the daily dose of the medication, the duration of the administration of the drug showed no correlation with the extent and severity of gingival hyperplasia. Only oral hygiene showed statistically significant correlation with the severity of gingival enlargement. The only clinical parameter influencing the extent and severity of gingival enlargement associated with Ca2+-channel blocker drugs was the quality of oral hygiene. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Scientific Browser]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[The treatment of life-threathening ventricular tachyarrhythmias in coronary artery disease - Antiarrhythmic drug or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator?]

BORBOLA József

[Sudden cardiac death due to sustained ventricular tachyarrhythmias accounts for approximately 50% of all cardiovascular deaths. From the major therapeutic options currently available, antiarrhythmic drug therapy and implantation of automatic car dioverter-defibrillators could be applied to the great majority of patients. Both early observations on automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator devices and more recent prospective, randomized, multicenter trials with long-term outcome data uniformly document sudden cardiac death recurrence rates of 1% to 2% annually, compared with recurrences rates of 15% to 25% without the device. There is now compelling evidence from studies suggesing that these devices are superior to antiarrhythmic drugs (Class I and III), both in terms of effectivity and life-saving effects. The implantation of the automatic cardioverter-defibrillator device is currently the first choice therapy for cardiac arrest survivors based on the AHA/ACC guideline (1998), and has to be considered in each case. In the future, the common, hybride treatment with antiarrhythmic device and drugs is expected. ]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

[The role of anaerobic bacteria in brain abscesses: a literature review]

URBÁN Edit, GAJDÁCS Márió

[Brain abscesses are potentially serious, life-threatening diseases that pose a complex diagnostic challenge not only to neurosurgeons but also to clinical microbiologists, neurologists, psychiatrists, infectologists. The etiology of brain abscess is usually polymicrobial, most commonly involving a variety of aerobic and obligate anaerobic bacteria. Epidemiological studies on the anaerobic etiology of brain abscesses are common between the time period of 1960s and 1980s, but today there are very few new publications on the subject. The role of anaerobic bacteria in this disease was presumably underdiagnosed for a very long time, as many laboratories did not have the adequate laboratory capabilities for their cultivation and identification. The purpose of this review is to summarize the available literature on the etiology of obligate anaerobic bacteria in brain abscesses, including their prevalence and current therapeutic recommendations.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Prevention of invasive meningococcal infection, recognition and first treatment of the disease in primary care]

KOVÁCS Ákos, KULCSÁR Andrea, KALABAY László, TORZSA Péter

[Neisseria meningitidis, the meningococcus, is a Gram-negative diplococcal bacterium that is only found naturally in humans. The meningococcus is part of the normal microbiota of the human nasopharynx and is commonly carried in healthy individuals. In some cases systemic invasion occurs, which can lead to meningitis and/or septicemia. Invasive disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis is potentially devastating, with a high case fatality rate and high rates of significant sequelae among survivors after septicaemia or meningitis. Between 2006-2015 every year between 34 and 70 were the numbers of the registered invasive disease because of Neisseria meningitis, the morbidity rate was 0.2-0.7⁰⁄₀₀₀₀. Half of the diseases (50.7%) were caused by B serotype N. meningitidis, 23.2% were C serotype. In this article the authors summarise what you must do and must not do as primary care physician when suddenly meeting a young patients suspected of having meningococcus infection. ]

LAM Extra for General Practicioners

[Changes in infectology over the past two decades]

SZALKA András

[Infectious diseases and various infections are the major causes of morbidity and mortality in developing as well as in industrialised countries. Despite the advances in the past decades in our understanding of microbes, efficient treatment of diseases and preventive approaches, more than 13 million people die every year due to infectious diseases. In the past two decades, more and more new pathogens and infections diseases have been emerging and old diseases that were almost forgotten have re-emerged. There are many new diseases for which we do not have or have hardly any efficient antimicrobial drugs and no efficient vaccines. Despite an increasing frequency of multi- and panresistant microbes, the development of new antibiotics to be used against these infections is unlikely to occur in the near future. The big pharmaceutical companies have stopped the research of antibiotics. In this situation, the only option we have is to use antibiotics rationally and to take prevention and control of infections seriously, both in the outpatient system and in hospitals. Preserving the effectiveness of currently used antibiotics is in everyone’s interest and is everyone’s responsibility]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[DIARRHOEA AND PSEUDOMEMBRANOUS COLITIS ASSOCIATED WITH ANTIBIOTIC TREATMENT]

LAKATOS László, LAKATOS Péter László

[Antibiotic treatment is complicated by diarrhea in 5 to 25% of the cases. Its prevalence depends on the antibiotic used, the patient’s age, the concomittant diseases and the immune response. The severity of the diarrhoea is variable ranging from a mild self-limiting disease lasting for 1 or 2 days to a severe condition with high mortality. The diarrhea may result from a direct effect on the gut, but more commonly it is the consequence of changes in resident gut flora. Clostridium difficile is responsible for 10 to 20% of all antibiotic-associated diarrhea cases. The clinical presentation varies from asymptomatic carriage to fulminant pseudomembranous colitis. This latter typically develops as a nosocomial infection, mainly in patients treated with cephalosporins, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid combination or clindamycin. Risk factors are advanced age, severe underlying disease, treatment in an intensive care unit, long hospitalization and invasive medical procedures. The clinical picture is characterized by frequent, watery (occasionally bloody) diarrhea, abdominal pain, tenesmus, fever, weakness. Fulminant colitis develops in 3-5% of cases. The diagnosis is based on testing for C. difficile toxins, but in selected cases rapid diagnosis can be made by flexible sigmoidoscopy. The treatment consists of the withdrawal of the implicated antibiotic along with administration of oral metronidazole or vancomycin which target C. difficile itself. Most patients respond to this treatment; however, the mortality of fulminant cases or those with severe underlying disease is high. Fifteen to 20% of the patients relapse and management of the recurrent cases is difficult. Combination treatment, probiotics and/or passive immunization may be used. Preventive measures include judicious use of antibiotics and aggressive control of the spread of C. difficile infection.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Prevention of invasive meningococcal infection, recognition and first treatment of the disease in primary care]

KOVÁCS Ákos, KULCSÁR Andrea, KALABAY László, TORZSA Péter

[In this article, based on a short case report, the authors summarise what you must do and must not do as a primary care physician when suddenly meeting a young patient suspected of having meningococcus infection. Neisseria meningitidis, the meningococcus, is a Gram-negative diplococcal bacterium that is only found naturally in humans. The meningococcus is part of the normal microbiota of the human nasopha-rynx and is commonly carried in healthy individuals. In some cases systemic invasion occurs, which can lead to meningitis and/or septicemia. Invasive disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis is potentially de­vastating, with a high case fatality rate and high rates of significant sequelae among survivors after septicaemia or meningitis. Between 2006 and 2015 every year there were 34 to 70 cases of the registered invasive disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis, the morbidity rate being 0.02-0.07‱. Half of the diseases (50.7%) were caused by serotype B N. meningitidis, 23.2% were serotype C. ]