Lege Artis Medicinae

[ANTIBIOTIC TREATMENT OF SKIN AND SOFT TISSUE INFECTIONS - THE USE OF RESPIRATORY FLUOROQUINOLONS]

MAGYAR Tamás

JULY 20, 2006

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2006;16(07)

[The paper reviews the classification and grading of skin and soft tissue infections and their most common pathogens. The recommended antibiotics are itemized taking into account their antibacterial and pharmacokinetic properties and side effects. The use of levofloxacin, an antibiotic that have so far been almost exclusively given in respiratory tract infections, is noted as a new therapeutic option. In unusually severe infections hospitalisation of the patient can be avoided since levofloxacin can also be prescribed by general practitioners. Both published data and the author's own experience suggest that levofloxacin may gain a prominent role in the treatment of skin and soft tissue infections both in primary and specialist care.]

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[WEGENER’S GRANULOMATOSIS PRESENTING AS MASTOIDITIS: A DIAGNOSTIC CHALLENGE]

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[INTRODUCTION - Wegener's granulomatosis has an uncertain pathomechanism, but is probably autoimmune in origin. In typical cases the mucosa of the nose, paranasal sinuses and of the lower respiratory tract, as well as the lungs and the kidneys are affected. Patients present with sinusitis, recurrent pneumonia or renal disease associated with microhaematuria, pyuria or azotaemia. Fever, polyarthralgia or polyarthritis may also occur. The underlying pathologic changes are necrotizing vasculitis, granulomas and parenchymal necrosis. The diagnosis is based on a combination of the clinical picture, microscopic findings and immunofluorescent demonstration of cANCA. CASE REPORT - A 27-year-old woman presented with symptoms of unilateral mastoiditis. In the following 7 months she underwent 7 operations in 4 hospitals for a locally progressive, destructive process of uncertain etiology showing a septic course. The clinical picture was not specific, the cANCA test was not definitive, and the histologic findings were initially interpreted as nonspecific inflammation. Repeated biopsies, multiple reviews of the microscopic specimens, consultations, differential diagnostic considerations, and, finally, the success of the treatment with corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide led to the diagnosis of Wegener’s granulomatosis. Currently the patient has been in remission for 32 months. CONCLUSION - The definitive diagnosis of Wegener’s granulomatosis, particularly of its localized or limited form, may be problematic despite well-defined diagnostic criteria. Setting up the correct diagnosis may take months or years. In case of unusual respiratory or otological symptoms, and in view of ineffective medical or surgical treatment, Wegener’s granulomatosis has to be considered. An atypical clinical picture, inconclusive histologic, radiologic and laboratory findings warrant the need for close collaboration of various specialists. This is particularly important since state-of-the-art therapy of Wegener’s granulomatosis promises a favourable prognosis.]

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[Over the past decade, the use of noninvasive ventilation in the setting of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has gained popularity, and is recommended by evidence-based guidelines. The evidence that it should be effective in chronic COPD is much weaker, and large, prospective, randomised, controlled studies that would also provide a guide for the selection of the best candidates, are still lacking. It has bee established, however, that home mechanical ventilation is certainly beneficial for a well-defined subgroup of patients. This includes the so called “blue bloater” patients (with hypercapnia and polyglobulia), other cases with increased hypercapnia, and patients with "overlapping" syndrome (COPD accompanied by sleep apnoe). Also, for patients with acute respiratory failure who refuse intratracheal intubation noninvasive mechanical ventilation remains the only choice. The past years have unequivocally proved the superiority of the positive pressure ventilation mode for either short term or long term use.]

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[Wertheim hysterectomy as a baseline surgical treatment for patients with FIGO stage 1a2-2a cervical cancer was introduced in 1989 at the National Institute of Oncology, Budapest, Hungary. From then until 2002 when the results were first evaluated 308 such operations were performed. The average 5- and 10-year survival rates were 80% and 75%, respectively. Although these results are comparable to literature data, several issues concerning this group of patients remain to be solved. The participation rate in the Pap test screening programme covered by the national health insurance is only 30%. There is no national database on the current treatment of these patients that could help identify the necessary steps to be taken in order to improve the results. The number of radical hysterectomies performed a year in Hungary, or their outcome, is not known. The treatment scheme varies among the institutes and so does surgical experience. There is no consent regarding treatment policy, preoperative irradiation or chemotherapy, surgical technique, or postoperative management. The improvement of the participation rate in the screening programme, the use of prognostic factors to determine the most appropriate treatment, the role of minimally invasive and fertility-preserving surgery, the preservation of ovaries and the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy are some of the further issues that need to be discussed. The first step should be data acquisition from all institutes in the country in order to develop and apply uniform treatment guidelines.]

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