Lege Artis Medicinae

[Antibiotic treatment of intra-abdominal infections, focusing on secondary peritonitis]

PULAY István1, KONKOLY THEGE Marianne2

OCTOBER 20, 2009

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2009;19(10)

[The morbidity and lethality of intra-abdominal infections are still high. Their first-line therapies include surgical or image-guided interventions. Adjuvant therapy with a broad-spectrum antibiotic is crucial for the treatment of polymicrobial infections. As initiation of the therapy is urgent, the antibiotic must be chosen empirically. Pathogens of community-acquired and nosocomial intra-abdominal infections are greatly different. The type of microbes, the general status of the patients, and the severity of their disease determine the choice of antibiotic or antibiotic combination. Using an adequate initial antibiotic decreases postoperative mortality and morbidity. Emerging new pathogens and the resistance of known germs against multiple antibiotics complicates the selection of the antiinfective therapy. Tigecycline is a new tetracyclin-derivative that offers a novel therapeutic option owing to its broad spectrum and efficiency against “problematic bacteria”. The current guidelines facilitate the selection of an empirical therapy, but they do not replace the individualised therapeutic approach.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Semmelweis Egyetem, I. Sebészeti Klinika
  2. Szent István és Szent László Kórház Mikrobiológiai Laboratóriuma

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