Lege Artis Medicinae

[An Acknowledgment for Building the Future ]

KUN J. Viktória

SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2019;29(08-09)

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[The Peeping Painter, or an Earned Military Cross ]

GEREVICH József

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[Scientific Superstitions Regarding the Female Body ]

MAGYAR László András

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[Recovering from Dependency ]

RÁCZ József

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[What may hurt the patient’s leg? Lower extremity ischaemia]

FENDRIK Krisztina, BIRÓ Katalin, KOLTAI Katalin, ENDREI Dóra, TÓTH Kálmán, KÉSMÁRKY Gábor

[Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is of high prevalence, and one of the most common clinical manifestations of the atherosclerosis beside ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease. PAD should be considered as a systemic disease, PAD patients have two times higher ten-year cardiovascular mortality than the normal population. For these reasons, the early recognition of the disease, the appropriate secondary preventive medical and non-medical therapy are of great importance. Risk stratification, proper physical examination, ankle pressure, ankle-brachial index, toe pressure, transcutaneous partial tissue oxygen pressure measurement and duplex ultrasound are the cornerstones to an early diagnosis. This summary aims at calling attention to the fact that lower extremity pain can not only be caused by musculo­sceletal diseases but limb and/or life-threatening limb ischaemia can be revealed in the background. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Hungary’s schizophrenic health policy - solutions under pressure ]

BALÁZS Péter

[There are internationally accepted models of health services that succeeded more or less in compromising public and private economy. Unfortunately, Hungary’s health policy was unable since ever to solve this problem. After the fall of the Communist health system (1989) this country was free to implement any means and ways without any external pressure thus only the health policy is responsible for our prevailing circumstances. Additionally, if seen from abroad the well-established medical grease-money of 50-100 thousand million HUF a year in medical services is a surplus burden of socioeconomic corruption. No question, it is necessary to explore any dysfunctions and negotiate with all particular pressure groups, however these actions do not result is system level changes. After 30 years of mismanagement it is time to take over a sound compact model which resembles our traditions and implement while respecting its limits of elasticity. ]

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[The authors surveyed the already known factors responsible for the osteoporotic bone fragility. Then the results of using modern imaging techniques (micro-CT, high-resolution peripheral computed quantitative tomograph - HR-pQCT) and advanced computer analytic methods (finite element analysis, FEA) are presented. These data - beyond the already known fracture risk factors (age, risk of falling, bone mineral density - BMD, and fine structure damage of trabecular bone) are stressing the importance of the (micro)damage of cortical bone as a fracture risk factor, which has been still underrated. The cortical thickening and increased porosity - verified on various population samples - are increasing the risk of fractures in certain subgroups of subjects having identical BMD values, even among those, who are considered only osteopenic by the earlier classification based on BMD values. Backed with modern software batteries, the new imaging techniques are expected to enter clinical application in the near future. Pharmacologic agents with stronger cortical effect are already available and research is continuing to find new drugs to use in the management of osteoporotic patients of high fracture risk.]

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[History of Daytime Hospital of the Department of Psychiatry in the University of Debrecen ]

ÉGERHÁZI Anikó, CSERÉP Edina, MAGYAR Erzsébet

[In Hungary, there was a ward related psychotherapy already since the 1960s, yet without any national network to the 1980s. In Debrecen the spreading of the psychotherapeutic approach started in the psychiatric facilities since the 1990s. Daytime Hospital was founded first in the County Hospital and later on in the Department of Psychiatry of the University. The latter option was provided by separating the psychiatry from neurology. This study presents the development of the day care at the Psychiatric Department along the opportunities and shows the structure of the actually functioning system finally reports on our future plans respectively. Initially started the occupational therapy, gymnastics, community cooking and walking, which did not require any separate rooms. The 22-bed psychotherapeutic unit was established 2014 with its joined capacity for 11 persons in the Daytime Hospital. The County Hospital is engaged primarily in socio-therapy of psychotic psychiatry pa­tients, however the Psychiatric Department is rehabilitating mainly patients with affective spectrum disorders. Patients are treated in socio-therapy and psychotherapy small groups for a half or one year. Afterward they enter the outpatient program, may join the Patient Club or decide for therapeutic occupation aiming the best way of recovery. According to the feedback, there is a long-term change in the mental state of the patients leading to improvement in their quality of life, which we plan to prove by an efficacy research program. ]

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PRÉDA István, KERECSEN Gábor, MAUROVICH-HORVAT Pál

[This review summarizes the diagnostic spectrum, ways of application and methodological difficulties of multislice computed tomographic (MSCT) coronary angiography. The non-invasive assessment of cardiac and coronary anatomy is now possible with computed tomographic coronary angiography using the modern 16 to 64-slice technology. This technique finds its main use today in the screening of patients with moderate probability of having coronary artery disease (atypical chest pain). Its negative predictive value varies between 97% and 99%, thus, a negative result of this non-invasive outpatient procedure can reduce the possibility of coronary artery disease to the minimum. Other important diagnostic applications include the follow-up of patients with coronary artery bypass, accurate diagnosis of coronary artery anomalies, and the simultaneous examination of the heart and great vessels. The future development of the technique is directed to coronary plaque characterization, particularly the detection of vulnerable plaques. The radiation exposure is relatively low (7-13 mSv), comparable with that of invasive coronary angiography.]

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[Changes in infectology over the past two decades]

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[Infectious diseases and various infections are the major causes of morbidity and mortality in developing as well as in industrialised countries. Despite the advances in the past decades in our understanding of microbes, efficient treatment of diseases and preventive approaches, more than 13 million people die every year due to infectious diseases. In the past two decades, more and more new pathogens and infections diseases have been emerging and old diseases that were almost forgotten have re-emerged. There are many new diseases for which we do not have or have hardly any efficient antimicrobial drugs and no efficient vaccines. Despite an increasing frequency of multi- and panresistant microbes, the development of new antibiotics to be used against these infections is unlikely to occur in the near future. The big pharmaceutical companies have stopped the research of antibiotics. In this situation, the only option we have is to use antibiotics rationally and to take prevention and control of infections seriously, both in the outpatient system and in hospitals. Preserving the effectiveness of currently used antibiotics is in everyone’s interest and is everyone’s responsibility]

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[End of the line? Addenda to the health and social care career of psychiatric patients living in Hungary’s asylums]

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[The authors are focusing on a special type of long term psychiatric care taking place in Hungary outside of the conventional mental health care system, by introducing some institutional aspects of the not well known world of so called social homes for psychiatric patients (asylums). After reviewing several caracteristics of institutional development of psychiatric care in Hun­gary based on selected Hungarian and in­ternational historical sources, the main struc­tural data of present Hungarian institutional capacities of psychiatric health and social care services are shown. Finally, the authors based on own personal experiences describe several functional ascpects of the largest existing asylum in EU, a so­cial home for long term care of psychiatric pa­tients. By the beginning of the 20th century, Hungarian psychiatric institutions were operating on an infrastructure of three large mental hospitals standing alone and several psychiatric wards incorporated into hospitals. Nevertheless, at the very first session of the Psychiatrists’ Conference held in 1900 many professionals gave warning: mental institutions were overcrowded and the quality of care provided in psychiatric hospital wards, many of which located in the countryside of Hungary, in most cases was far from what would have been professionally acceptable. The solution was seen in the building of new independent mental hospitals and the introduction of a family nursing institution already established in Western Europe; only the latter measure was implemented in the first half of the 20th century but with great success. However, as a result of the socio-political-economic-ideological turn following the Second World War, the institution of family nursing was dismantled while different types of psychiatric care facilities were developed, such as institutionalised hospital and outpatient care. In the meantime, a new type of institution emerged in the 1950s: the social home for psychiatric pa­tients, which provided care for approximately the same number of chronic psychiatric patients nationwide as the number of functioning hospital beds for acute psychiatric patients. This have not changed significantly since, while so­cial homes for psychiatric patients are perhaps less visible to the professional and lay public nowadays, altough their operational conditions are deteriorating of late years. Data show, that for historical reasons the current sys­tem of inpatient psychiatric care is proportionately arranged between health care and social care institutions; each covering one third. Further research is needed to fully explore and understand the current challenges that the system of psychiatric care social- and health care institu­tions are facing. An in-depth analysis would significantly contribute to the comprehensive improvement of the quality of services and the quality of lives of patients, their relatives and the health- and social care professionals who support them. ]