Lege Artis Medicinae

[Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) 75 or 100 mg? ]

KIS János Tibor, ZSIGMOND Kálmán

OCTOBER 20, 2018

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2018;28(10)

[The acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is one of the oldest and most widely used drugs in the world. Currently, it is the most commonly used for the treatment and prophylaxis of cardiovascular diseases. Today, there has been consensus that the risk of ASA’s side effects in primary prevention is greater than the expected benefits. However, it maintains its leading role in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. There is also a consensus that small doses are recommended for preventive purposes, but there is no agreement whether it should be 75 or 81 or 100 mg. The authors summa­rize the publications published in this topic. ]

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