Lege Artis Medicinae

[Accepting the Patient’s Decision]

dr. VADÁSZ Gábor

FEBRUARY 21, 2008

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2008;18(02)

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[Adenoma of the adrenal cortex imitating renal cancer]

SEJBEN István, GÖCZŐ Katalin, SZABÓ Zoltán, CSERNI Gábor

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[Microscopic colitis]

BARTA Zsolt

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[MODERN TREATMENT OF COLORECTAL CANCER]

KALMÁR Katalin, HORVÁTH Örs Péter

[The incidence of colorectal cancer has dramatically increased in the past decades, rendering it the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in the Western world. Disease outcome can be improved both by early diagnosis, e.g., through the introduction and extension of screening programs, and by increased therapeutic efficiency. The latter is achieved by increasing the radicality of interventions in surgical oncology to total mesorectal excision, thereby significantly decreasing the frequency of local recurrence. High ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery aims to enhance the efficiency of lymphadenectomy. With the introduction of techniques that spare vegetative nerves, the quality of life will not be adversely affected by the increased radicality. Another direction of progress in colorectal surgery is the increased use of minimally invasive approaches, such as local excision by transanal endoscopic microsurgery or laparoscopic methods. Increased acceptance of a multimodality approach, i.e., combined application of surgical and oncological methods in the treatment of colorectal cancer, has been a great step forward recently. Beyond the long-applied adjuvant treatments, the pre-surgical use of neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy has become standard for locally advanced rectal cancers. Adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapy also supplements the surgery of metastases with improving results and impressive long-term survivals. A very important prerequisite for tailored multimodality treatment is reliable staging, which is facilitated by the wider availability of endorectal ultrasound.]

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[“You Cannot Break your Word Given to the Patient” A Discussion with Ida Matkó MD]

FERENCZI Andrea

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We aimed to analyze the clinical, laboratory and neuroimaging findings in patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in a single center as well as to review other published cases in Turkey. Between January 1st, 2014 and June 31st, 2017, all CJD cases were evaluated based on clinical findings, differential diagnosis, the previous misdiagnosis, electroencephalography (EEG), cerebrospinal fluid and cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in our center. All published cases in Turkey between 2005-2018 were also reviewed. In a total of 13 patients, progressive cognitive decline was the most common presenting symptom. Two patients had a diagnosis of Heidenhain variant, 1 patient had a diagnosis of Oppenheimer-Brownell variant. Seven patients (53.3%) had been misdiagnosed with depression, vascular dementia, normal pressure hydrocephalus or encephalitis. Eleven patients (87%) had typical MRI findings but only 5 of these were present at baseline. Asymmetrical high signal abnormalities on MRI were observed in 4 patients. Five patients (45.4%) had periodic spike wave complexes on EEG, all appeared during the follow-up. There were 74 published cases in Turkey bet­ween 2005 and 2018, with various clinical presentations. CJD has a variety of clinical features in our patient series as well as in cases reported in Turkey. Although progressive cognitive decline is the most common presenting symptom, unusual manifestations in early stages of the disease might cause misdiagnosis. Variant forms should be kept in mind in patients with isolated visual or cerebellar symptoms. MRI and EEG should be repeated during follow-up period if the clinical suspicion still exists.

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The cause of intracerebral, subarachnoid and subdural haemorrhage is different, and the simultaneous appearance in the same case is extremely rare. We describe the case of a patient with a ruptured aneurysm on the distal segment of the middle cerebral artery, with a concomitant subdural and intracerebral haemorrhage, and a subsequent secondary brainstem (Duret) haemorrhage. The 59-year-old woman had hypertension and diabetes in her medical history. She experienced anomic aphasia and left-sided headache starting one day before admission. She had no trauma. A few minutes after admission she suddenly became comatose, her breathing became superficial. Non-contrast CT revealed left sided fronto-parietal subdural and subarachnoid and intracerebral haemorrhage, and bleeding was also observed in the right pontine region. The patient had leucocytosis and hyperglycemia but normal hemostasis. After the subdural haemorrhage had been evacuated, the patient was transferred to intensive care unit. Sepsis developed. Echocardiography did not detect endocarditis. Neurological status, vigilance gradually improved. The rehabilitation process was interrupted by epileptic status. Control CT and CT angiography proved an aneurysm in the peripheral part of the left middle cerebral artery, which was later clipped. Histolo­gical examination excluded mycotic etiology of the aneu­rysm and “normal aneurysm wall” was described. The brain stem haemorrhage – Duret bleeding – was presumably caused by a sudden increase in intracranial pressure due to the supratentorial space occupying process and consequential trans-tentorial herniation. This case is a rarity, as the patient not only survived, but lives an active life with some residual symptoms.

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Introduction – Although the involvement of the hypoglossal nerve together with other cranial nerves is common in several pathological conditions of the brain, particularly the brainstem, isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy is a rare condition and a diagnostic challenge. Case presentation – The presented patient arrived to the hospital with a history of slurred speech and an uncomfortable sensation on his tongue. Neurological examination showed left-sided hemiatrophy of the tongue with fasciculations and deviation towards the left side during protrusion. Based on the clinical and MRI findings, a diagnosis of hypoglossal nerve schwannoma was made. Discussion – Hypoglossal nerve palsy may arise from multiple causes such as trauma, infections, neoplasms, and endocrine, autoimmune and vascular pathologies. In our case, the isolated involvement of the hypoglossal nerve was at the skull base segment, where the damage to the hypoglossal nerve may occur mostly due to metastasis, nasopharyngeal carcinomas, nerve sheath tumors and glomus tumors. Conclusion – Because of the complexity of the region’s anatomy, the patient diagnosed with hypoglossal nerve schwannoma was referred for gamma knife radiosurgery.