Lege Artis Medicinae

[A Teacher who Created a School ]

BEDROS J. Róbert1

JUNE 20, 2013

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2013;23(05-06)

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Szent Imre Kórház

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Health or an Absence of Symptoms? – Or the Faces of Decontextualised Medicine ]

DARUKA István

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Mátyás Peken, Surgeon Professor and Physiologist ]

V. MOLNÁR László

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Summer Exhibitions at the Museum of Fine Arts ]

NAGY Zsuzsanna

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Death of Hungarian Poets ]

CZEIZEL Endre

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Dániel Fischer on Madness (1716) ]

MAGYAR László András

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Second game, 37th move and Fourth game 78th move]

VOKÓ Zoltán

[What has Go to do with making clinical decisions? One of the greatest intellectual challenges of bedside medicine is making decisions under uncertainty. Besides the psychological traps of traditionally intuitive and heuristic medical decision making, lack of information, scarce resources and characteristics of doctor-patient relationship contribute equally to this uncertainty. Formal, mathematical model based analysis of decisions used widely in developing clinical guidelines and in health technology assessment provides a good tool in theoretical terms to avoid pitfalls of intuitive decision making. Nevertheless it can be hardly used in individual situations and most physicians dislike it as well. This method, however, has its own limitations, especially while tailoring individual decisions, under inclusion of potential lack of input data used for calculations, or its large imprecision, and the low capability of the current mathematical models to represent the full complexity and variability of processes in complex systems. Nevertheless, clinical decision support systems can be helpful in the individual decision making of physicians if they are well integrated in the health information systems, and do not break down the physicians’ autonomy of making decisions. Classical decision support systems are knowledge based and rely on system of rules and problem specific algorithms. They are utilized widely from health administration to image processing. The current information revolution created the so-called artificial intelligence by machine learning methods, i.e. machines can learn indeed. This new generation of artificial intelligence is not based on particular system of rules but on neuronal networks teaching themselves by huge databases and general learning algorithms. This type of artificial intelligence outperforms humans already in certain fields like chess, Go, or aerial combat. Its development is full of challenges and threats, while it presents a technological breakthrough, which cannot be stopped and will transform our world. Its development and application has already started also in the healthcare. Health professionals must participate in this development to steer it into the right direction. Lee Sedol, 18-times Go world champion retired three years after his historical defeat from AlphaGo artificial intelligence, be­cause “Even if I become the No. 1, there is an entity that cannot be defeated”. It is our great luck that we do not need to compete or defeat it, we must ensure instead that it would be safe and trustworthy, and in collaboration with humans this entity would make healthcare more effective and efficient. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Sleep habits among preschool- and schoolchildren]

FUSZ Katalin, RITECZ Bernadett, BALOGH Brigitta, TAKÁCS Krisztina, SOMLAI Eszter, RAPOSA L. Bence, OLÁH András

[Objective - Our aim is to evaluate sleep habits, sleep quality and influencing factors among preschool- and schoolchildren. Method - Two questionnaires were recorded. Questionnaire 1 dealt with sleeping habits, breastfeeding and health behavior of preschool children and infant, and it contained the abbreviated version of the Children’s Sleep Habits Questionnaire. Questionnaire 2 dealt with health behavior and the application of sleep hygiene rules, as well as it contained the Athens Insomnia Scale. Subjects - We assessed a total of 1063 questionnaires: 516 kindergarten children participated in our online survey across the country; 547 primary and secondary school students participated in the 2nd questionnaire survey in Szolnok. Results - Parents’ observation shows that the average nighttime sleeping time of kindergarten children is 10 hours 20 minutes on weekdays and 10 hours 36 minutes on weekends. The most popular sleeping habits in kindergarten age: teal reading (65.1%) and co-sleeping (42.8%). Parents of infants used breastfeeding (50.4%) and rocking (43.2%) most frequently before sleep. Co-sleeping has a positive influence on the length of lactation. Among the preschool sleeping habits we have proved a number of positive effects of teal reading, while watching television have negative effects. The sleep quality of school-age children according to the Athens Insomnia Scale is 6.11 points (SD: 4.11), 19% of the children are insomniac. Their sleep time is 7 hours 31 minutes on weekdays and 9 hours 30 minutes on weekends. The usage of good health behavior and sleep hygiene rules positively influence sleep quality and sleep duration. Conclusions - With our results, we would like to draw the attention of children and parents to the importance of sleeping and using sleep hygiene rules.]

Clinical Neuroscience

A new method to determine the optimal orientation of Slim Modiolar cochlear implant electrode array insertion

HORVÁTH Bence, PERÉNYI Ádám, MOLNÁR Fiona Anna, CSANÁDY Miklós, KISS József Géza, ROVÓ László

Our goal was to determine the optimal orientation of insertion of the Slim Modiolar electrode and develop an easy-to-use method to aid implantation surgery. In some instances, the electrode arrays cannot be inserted in their full length. This can lead to buckling, interscalar dislocation or tip fold-over. In our opinion, one of the possible reasons of tip fold-over is unfavourable orientation of the electrode array. Our goal was to determine the optimal orientation of the Slim Modiolar electrode array relative to clear surgical landmarks and present our method in one specified case. For the measurement, we used the preoperative CT scan of one of our cochlear implant patients. These images were processed by an open source and free image visualization software: 3D Slicer. In the first step we marked the tip of the incus short process and then created the cochlear view. On this view we drew two straight lines: the first line represented the insertion guide of the cochlear implant and the second line was the orientation marker (winglet). We determined the angle enclosed by winglet and the line between the tip of the incus short process and the cross-section of previously created two lines. For the calculation we used a self-made python code. The result of our algorithm for the angle was 46.6055°. To validate this result, we segmented, from the CT scan, the auditory ossicles and the membranaceous labyrinth. From this segmentation we generated a 3D reconstruction. On the 3D view, we can see the position of the previous lines relative to the anatomical structures. After this we rotated the 3D model together with the lines so that the insertion guide forms a dot. In this view, the angle was measured with ImageJ and the result was 46.599°. We found that our method is easy, fast, and time-efficient. The surgery can be planned individually for each patient, based on their routine preoperative CT scan of the temporal bone, and the implantation procedure can be made safer. In the future we plan to use this method for all cochlear implantation surgeries, where the Slim Modiolar electrode is used.

Clinical Neuroscience

Cause of recurrent rhabdomyolysis, carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency and novel pathogenic mutation

ÇAKAR Emel Nafiye, GÖR Zeynep, YEŞIL Gözde

Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is an autosomal inherited metabolic disorder in which the β-oxidation of the long chain fatty acids is defective. The clinical presentation may be in various forms; it presents itself in the severe form during neonatal and infantile periods and as the less severe myopathic form in the school age and adolescence. While the severity of the rhabdomyolysis attacks varies, occasionally the clinical course may be complicated with acute renal failure. Acylcarnitine analysis may help in the diagnosis of CPT II, but its normality does not indicate the absence of the disease. If there is strong suspicion, genetic analysis should be performed on the cases. In this article, we present a 15-year-old male patient who had two rhabdomyolysis attacks triggered by infection and starvation. Acylcarnitine analysis of the case was normal, CPT II deficiency was considered when the history was evaluated, and CPT II gene c.137A>G (p.Gln46Arg) homozygous novel pathogenic mutation was detected. CPT II deficiency is one of the most common causes of metabolic rhabdomyolysis in patients with recurrent episodes of rhabdomyolysis.

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Relationship of adolescents’ eating behavior and motivations with self-control and risk perception]

SZABÓ Katalin, PIKÓ Bettina

[Obesity and related diseases caused by unhealthy eating form a serious public health problem already in youth. In terms of prevention, it is essential to explore adolescents’ eating behaviors and factors influencing their diet. Our study aimed to explore adolescents’ eating behaviors, its motivations and their relation to self-control and risk perception related to eating behavior. Participants were 374 high school students (48% males; mean age: 16 years, S.D.=1.5) from Szeged and Bu­da­pest. Self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection which assessed socio-demographics, eating behaviors, mo­ti­vation, eating behavior related risk perception and self-control. Using factor analysis, we categorized eating behaviors (“junk food/drink consumption”; “health-oriented nutrition”; and “snacking and habit-oriented nutrition”), and eating motivations (“social, emotional and external motives”; “traditions and internal motives”; and “health motives”). According to correlation analysis, self-control was positively related to health-oriented nutrition and health motives and negatively to junk food/drink consumption and social, emotional and external motives. These two latter factors were associated with an increased risk perception as well. Our results draw the attention to strengthen self-control and explore the role of risk perception and eating motivations in school health education programs. ]