Lege Artis Medicinae

[A Brief Compendium of Unusual Remedies The Curative Massage]

MAGYAR László András

JANUARY 22, 2008

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2008;18(01)

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Lege Artis Medicinae

[Call for the LAM Awards]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[PAIN AND PAIN CONTROL IN RHEUMATOLOGY]

GAÁL János

[In developed industrial countries the overall population prevalence of chronic rheumatic pain is around 35%. A classification that is useful in everyday practice is based on the origin of musculoskeletal pain and lists pain associated with degenerative joint diseases, pain related to metabolic bone diseases, non-articular and soft tissue rheumatism, and pain due to inflammation. In chronic pain syndrome pain itself has lost its adaptive biological role, and presents as a pathogenetic factor in its own right, accompanied by significant vegetative and psychological symptoms. Therapeutic exercise is of basic importance in the management of rheumatic pain. It is supplemented by various pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic methods. The latter include, among others, fomentations, packs, balneo- and hydrotherapeutic methods, electro-, mechanoand thermotherapeutic approaches. Pharmacological therapy usually means the use of simple analgesics, non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs, steroids, minor opiates, and, lately, also major opiates, which may be supplemented by adjuvant agents such as tricyclic antidepressants and anticonvulsive drugs. When indicating the most often used non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs, their potential side effects should carefully be considered. Invasive pain-killing methods on the border area between anaesthesiology and rheumatology (epidural steroid administration, ganglionic blockade, intravenous regional blockade) are applied in cases that do not respond to conventional therapy, and sometimes also as successful first-line intervention.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[For another… - A thing or two on Hungary, in January 2008]

KAPÓCS Gábor

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[Lansoprazol in the defence against oxidative stress - Experimental data]

HEGYI Péter, TAKÁCS Tamás, RAKONCZAY Zoltán

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[Their Song is for Eternity]

VAS József Pál

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Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: A single center experience and systemic analysis of cases in Turkey

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We aimed to analyze the clinical, laboratory and neuroimaging findings in patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in a single center as well as to review other published cases in Turkey. Between January 1st, 2014 and June 31st, 2017, all CJD cases were evaluated based on clinical findings, differential diagnosis, the previous misdiagnosis, electroencephalography (EEG), cerebrospinal fluid and cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in our center. All published cases in Turkey between 2005-2018 were also reviewed. In a total of 13 patients, progressive cognitive decline was the most common presenting symptom. Two patients had a diagnosis of Heidenhain variant, 1 patient had a diagnosis of Oppenheimer-Brownell variant. Seven patients (53.3%) had been misdiagnosed with depression, vascular dementia, normal pressure hydrocephalus or encephalitis. Eleven patients (87%) had typical MRI findings but only 5 of these were present at baseline. Asymmetrical high signal abnormalities on MRI were observed in 4 patients. Five patients (45.4%) had periodic spike wave complexes on EEG, all appeared during the follow-up. There were 74 published cases in Turkey bet­ween 2005 and 2018, with various clinical presentations. CJD has a variety of clinical features in our patient series as well as in cases reported in Turkey. Although progressive cognitive decline is the most common presenting symptom, unusual manifestations in early stages of the disease might cause misdiagnosis. Variant forms should be kept in mind in patients with isolated visual or cerebellar symptoms. MRI and EEG should be repeated during follow-up period if the clinical suspicion still exists.

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Introduction - Syncope is defined as a brief transient loss of consciousness due to cerebral hypoperfusion. Although the diagnosis of syncope is based on a thorough history and examination, electroencaphalography (EEG) is also an important investigational tool in the differential diagnosis in this group of patients. In this study we aimed to identify the diagnostic value of EEG in patients with syncope. Methods - We retrospectively examined EEG recordings of 288 patients with the diagnosis of syncope referred to the Cankiri State Hospital EEG laboratory, from January 2014 to January 2016. The EEG findings were classified into 6 groups as normal, epileptiform discharges (spike and sharp waves), generalized background slowing, focal slowing, hemispherical asymmetries, and low amplitude EEG tracing. The EEGs were separated according to gender and age. Results - Total of 288 patients were included in this study, 148 were females (51.4%) and 140 (48.6%) were males. Among all the EEG reports, 203 (70.5%) were normal, 8 of them (2.8%) showed generalized background slowing and 7 (2.4%) demonstrated focal slow waves. Epileptiform discharges occured among 13 patients (4.5%). Hemispherical asymmetries were detected in 10 patients (3.5%) and low amplitude EEG tracing in 47 patients (16.3%). There was no significant difference between age groups in EEG findings (p=0.3). Also no significant difference was detected in EEG results by gender (p=0.2). Discussion - Although the diagnosis of syncope, epilepsy and non-epileptic seizures is clinical diagnosis, EEG still remains additional method

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[We present three cases, where young patients had unilateral disc edema with normal optic nerve function. We diagnosed their disease as big blind spot syndrome (BBSS). What is remarkable, however, is that in two of the three cases the extent of the visual field defect considerably exceeded the one regularly emerging in BBSS, which caused us some difficulty in differential diagnosis. The characteristics and the differential diagnostic questions of the big blind spot syndrome are summarised and we would like to draw attention to this unusual, but probably not very rare, form of it.]

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[The importance of the sleep related breathing disorders (obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, central sleep apnea, and Cheyne-Stokes breathing) in the pathophysiology crebro- and cardiovascular disorders is well known. The relationship of sleep related breathing abnormalities and epilepsy is also important but underestimated in the daily practice. The relation is bidirectional. The breathing abnormalities in sleep may play important role in generating epileptic seizure, but the adverse effect of seizure and antiepileptic therapy (generation of apneas and hypopneas) may worsen the seizure control. The effect of new therapies (vagal nerve and deep brain stimulation) on the sleep architecture and sleep disordered breathing must be examined and discussed. Here we present a brief case of epileptic patient with deep brain stimulation therapy on sleep as well. The examination of the sleep related breathing abnormalities in epilepsy patient may help improve the effectiveness of antiepileptic therapy.]