LAM KID

[Osseal and extraosseal effects of vitamin D]

GAÁL János

MARCH 30, 2013

LAM KID - 2013;3(01)

[The author reviews the literature on the osseal and extraosseal effects of vitamin D, discussing the role of vitamin D sufficiency in the maintenance of normal bone structure and bone mass, in fracture prevention and in the efficacy on antiporotic treatment. The effects of vitamin D on hemopoiesis, tumours, muscles, articular cartilage, lungs, cardiovascular system, central nervous system, skin and certain metabolic disorders are also discussed. The paper particularly emphasises and describes on a cellular level the immune-modulating effect of vitamin D and its influence on autoimmune disorders.]

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