Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[Influencing Factors of Parenting Sense of Competence - Focusing on Sense of Coherence]

CSIGÓ Luca1, KARÁCSONY Ilona Hajnalka2

OCTOBER 30, 2018

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice - 2018;31(05)

[The aim of the study: Parenting sense of competence (PSOC) has major impact on children’s development. The aim of this study was to examine the influencing factors of the parenting sense of competence from the aspect of a Health Visitor, especially focusing on sense of coherence (SOC). Material and method: A quantitative, cross-sectional, online study was carried out in 2017. A non-random sampling was applied with 254 mothers, who cared healthy, 0-6-year-old children. A self-edited survey was used and we examined SOC by its standard scale (SOC-13). For the data analysis Chi2 probability was used (p<0,05). Results: The mean age of the mothers was 33 years, 47,8% had 2 children and almost 60%. were higher educated. The mean point of SOC was 58,49. Age and sense of coherence had major impact on PSOC (p<0,05). There was not correlation between the residence, the education level, the marital status and PSOC (p>0,05). However the judgement of the Heath Visitors was excellent, internet was the main source of information about childcare. At the same time, human resources were mostly used in practise. Conclusion: The sociodemographic factors had lower impact on PSOC but it had a strong rela­tion­ship with SOC. In case of a risk groups Health Visitor could be a resource, against physical and psychosocial stressors, and she also could help to develop the parenting sense of competence. The role of the professionals should be enhanced in the parents’ source of knowledge related to their children.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Pécsi Tudományegyetem Egészségtudományi Kar Szombathelyi Képzési Központ; Egészségügyi Gondozás és Prevenció szak; Védőnő szakirány
  2. Pécsi Tudományegyetem Egészségtudományi Kar Szombathelyi Képzési Központ; Ápolástudományi, Alapozó Egészségtudományi és Védőnői Intézet; Védőnői és Prevenciós Tanszék

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Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[Faces from the Hungarian Nursing Hall of Fame: the exemplary careers of two Hungarian recipients of the Florence Nightingale Medal Part 2]

SÖVÉNYI Ferencné, PERKÓ Magdolna, FEDINECZNÉ VITTAY Katalin, BOROS Károlyné

[This part of the series of articles on Hungarian recipients of the Florence Nightingale Medal is dedicated to the life and work of Ms Vera Józsefné Marosi. Two of the authors of the article had the privilege and honor not only to know Ms. Vera Marosi personally, but also to have been her students and co-workers at the Vocational Secondary School of Nursing, Postgraduate Medical School, Budapest. The other awardee whose life is presented is Ms. Anci Jánosné Faragó who was the last nurse in the Hungarian nursing community to be awarded the Medal in 2003. What connects the two outstanding nursing personalities is that both of them started out as teachers and educators and turned towards nursing spurred by historical circumstances, the cruelties of World War II and last but not least their humanity and desire to help others. ]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[Comparative analysis of job and life satisfaction among theatre nurses in Hungary and Germany]

MÁTÉ Szilvia, PHIL. TIGGES-LIMMER Katharina, PUSZTAFALVI Henriette

[The aim of the study: The objective of the study was to assess and compare job and life satisfaction affected by workplace problems, stress, rewards, success and social support. We analyzed the coping strategies applied by the employees to solves the above problems. Material and method: The anonymous data collection was carried out in October, 2015 by applying AVEM and an own-edited socio-demographic questionnaire among theatre nurses from Hungarian and German clinics. Results: The employees evaluated stressful situations and problems differently in the two groups examined. Job satisfaction was equally important for both groups, but it affected life satisfaction of the Hungarian employees to greater extent. The stress management of the Hungarian employees was more effective in spite of the fact that German nurses used more coping strategies. Social support had a positive effect on overcoming the workplace problems in both groups. Conclusions: Job satisfaction of the nurses has a beneficial effect on their life satisfaction. The ability to divide work and private life and stress management are different among the nurses. Job satisfaction can be improved by workplace health promotion programs.]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[Assessment of environmental health and knowledge of silicosis among dental technicians]

LÁNG Anett, HIRDI Henriett Éva

[The aim of the study: The aim was to assess the health status of the Hungarian dental technicians and their knowledge of silicosis diseases. Methods: The survey was conducted in December 2017 - January 2018 through self-constructed online questionnaire among dental laboratory technicians in Budapest. Data were analysed with SPSS 22.0. Results: The survey was completed by 157 dental technicians. The sample consisted 80 male and 77 women. The average age was 38. Technicians were working for 9.4 hours a day. About the self equipment most of the participants (94.3%) wear respiratory protective equipment during laboratory work but 5.1% of them do not feel that the use of masks is necessary in laboratory. 13.37% of the participants don’t know the symptoms of silicosis and other 39.47% of them don’t know the right answer. Conclusions: The research has shown that the work safety situation of dental technicians is extremely low and their access to occupational health care is limited. The test results also demonstrated the need for early transfer of basic knowledge about the silicosis disease (its way of preventing, symptom, diagnosis and consequences) among dental technicians. ]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[Postoperative Pain Management Today in Hungary Part 1 ]

LOVASI Orsolya, LÁM Judit

[According to the results of relevant publications the practice for providing effective postoperative pain relief needs to be improved in Hungary. The inadequate pain management can occur several complications resulting prolonged recovery and increased cost of care. Providing adequate analgesia is not only a regulated activity, but a professional, ethical and moral obligation to diminish patients’ suffering. The current practice of pain management was evaluated in several Hungarian hospitals with questionnaires and interviews, analyzing the local pain protocols, and identifying the deeper causes of problems founded. After the comparison of our findings with the suggestions founded in the literature we identified numerous issues to be enhanced. The suggestions based on the results of our study are worth to be reconsidered to improve the current pain management practice of the health care providers performing surgical procedures. ]

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