Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[Does the optimal attention has preserving of the our health during organizing of the our travell?]

TÓTH Ildikó, BEKE Szilvia

OCTOBER 20, 2015

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice - 2015;28(05)

[The study aims to show the relationship between health and travel. Most people do not even count during the journey the possibility of disease, which was confirmed during the research. The study shows the most common illnesses and vaccinations. Henceforth we review the travel health tasks. During the authors’s research questionnaire survey was carried out by 164 persons filled out. The responses confirmed that during our travels our health in need background. Our aim was to raise awareness of what individuals and health care are important. ]

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[The effects of perceived work-related stress on the life style, health and sleep of nurses]

GÁL-INGES Dóra, NÉMETH Anikó

[Aim of the research: The present study aim to assess how the stress level influences the life style, health and sleep. Research and sampling methods: A self-developed questionnaire was administered online during April and May 2015 (N=556). SPSS 9.0 was used for the data analysis; chi square, independent samples t-test and Spearman’s rank correlation were applied (p<0.05). Results: The higher the level of perceived stress is at work, the worse the self-rated health condition (p<0.001), quality (p<0.001) and quantity (p<0.001) of sleep and dietary habits (p<0.001) are. In the group with higher stress level at work intermittent insomnia (p=0.009) and tired mornings (p<0.001) were more frequent. Participants reported their meals to be irregular (p<0.001) and hasty (p=0.006). There were no significant differences regarding chronic illnesses and addictions compared to the group with lower work-related stress levels. Conclusions: According to these results the level of work-related stress correlates negatively with dietary habits, sleep and self-reported health status. ]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[Experiences with the combined use of Versiva, non-adhesive foam dressing and Curiosa gel in chronic wound care]

BOROS Katalin Gyöngyi, TAKÁCS Tibor, VARGÁNÉ TERHES Anita, CSERNUS Mariann

[Up-to-date wound care is a kind of teamwork that requires modern bandage, a high degree of theoretical knowledge and a strong sense of vocation. The authors describe the complete healing of a patient’s diabetic foot ulcer with all these three factors present. Patients suffering from all the complications of diabetes can often have faith only in the dedicated medical staff. An old patient having almost lost his vision can be treated successfully for diabetic foot ulcer in the period of 11 months due to modern wound management and vascular surgery. With the presentation of this case the authors wish to emphasise the need for devoting more time to medical training concerning modern wound care, and to improve the psychological management of the affected patient. ]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[Nurse student’s attitude, knowledge and experience related to complementary medicine]

SÁRVÁRY Andrea, HAJDUNÉ DEMCSÁK Lívia, RADÓ Sándorné, SÁRVÁRY Attila

[Aim of the research: Investigating nurse students’ attitude towards complementary and alternative medicine and their knowledge of and experience with it. Research and sampling methods: 171 Hungarian nurse (57 full time and 114 part time) students participated in our cross-sectional study using a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Nurse students’ attitude towards alternative medicine is positive. The most known alternative methods were massage, herbal medicine, acupuncture, homeopathy, relaxation and meditation. The most used practices were massage, herbal medicine and homeopathy and found them efficient. Full time students used the Internet and part time students used education as information sources. Most students agreed that the integration of alternative methods into health care would be effective, and it should be taught in higher education. Conclusions: Nursing student would get reliable knowledge by integrating alternative medicine into higher education system and it takes their work more effective. ]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[Clinical training makes perfect]

BURJÁNNÉ TÖRÖK Orsolya

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Influenza vaccination of pregnant women and the experiences related to the pandemic influenza A-virus H1N1 infection in Hungary 2009]

CZEIZEL Endre

[During the influenza A-H1N1 pandemic, only about 16% of pregnant women were vaccinated against the virus, despite their higher expected mortality risk. According to the official data, five pregnant women died. In addition, the high fever that occurs in influenza increases the risk of some congenital abnormalities. The vaccine used in Hungary is not associated with severe complications in pregnant women and their fetuses, therefore, it can be administered during any stage of pregnancy. The author discusses the causes that deterred pregnant women from being vaccinated. The main problem seems to be that some physicians were under-informed and were reluctant to take responsibility.]

LAM Extra for General Practicioners

[Changes in infectology over the past two decades]

SZALKA András

[Infectious diseases and various infections are the major causes of morbidity and mortality in developing as well as in industrialised countries. Despite the advances in the past decades in our understanding of microbes, efficient treatment of diseases and preventive approaches, more than 13 million people die every year due to infectious diseases. In the past two decades, more and more new pathogens and infections diseases have been emerging and old diseases that were almost forgotten have re-emerged. There are many new diseases for which we do not have or have hardly any efficient antimicrobial drugs and no efficient vaccines. Despite an increasing frequency of multi- and panresistant microbes, the development of new antibiotics to be used against these infections is unlikely to occur in the near future. The big pharmaceutical companies have stopped the research of antibiotics. In this situation, the only option we have is to use antibiotics rationally and to take prevention and control of infections seriously, both in the outpatient system and in hospitals. Preserving the effectiveness of currently used antibiotics is in everyone’s interest and is everyone’s responsibility]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Prevention of invasive meningococcal infection, recognition and first treatment of the disease in primary care]

KOVÁCS Ákos, KULCSÁR Andrea, KALABAY László, TORZSA Péter

[Neisseria meningitidis, the meningococcus, is a Gram-negative diplococcal bacterium that is only found naturally in humans. The meningococcus is part of the normal microbiota of the human nasopharynx and is commonly carried in healthy individuals. In some cases systemic invasion occurs, which can lead to meningitis and/or septicemia. Invasive disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis is potentially devastating, with a high case fatality rate and high rates of significant sequelae among survivors after septicaemia or meningitis. Between 2006-2015 every year between 34 and 70 were the numbers of the registered invasive disease because of Neisseria meningitis, the morbidity rate was 0.2-0.7⁰⁄₀₀₀₀. Half of the diseases (50.7%) were caused by B serotype N. meningitidis, 23.2% were C serotype. In this article the authors summarise what you must do and must not do as primary care physician when suddenly meeting a young patients suspected of having meningococcus infection. ]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[Practice of the Hepatitis B vaccination with non-responder patients in our Centre]

GÓZ Lászlóné, KÖRTVÉLYESINÉ Bari Krisztina, BECS Gergely, SZABÓ P. Réka, BALLA József, KÁRPÁTI István, MÁTYUS János, UJHELYI László, BEN Thomas

[Introduction: End-stage renal disease patients under dialysis have impaired immune system and are more susceptible to infection, even those infections that can be prevented by vaccination (e.g. hepatitis B). If the antibody titer (anti-HBs) remains <10 IU/ml after two consecutive vaccinations, patients are classified as non-responders. Reasons for unsuccessful vaccinations include technical, immunological (e.g. multigene haplotypes) reasons. They are often also associated with chronic diseases. Aim of the research: To re-vaccinate patients after unsuccessful intramuscular vaccination to achieve immunity. Research and sampling methods: Intracutaneous vaccination can be a viable alternative for successful immunity. 6 months after re-immunisation, anti-HBs titer>10 IU/mL indicate a successful immune response. Results: 22 haemodialysed patients received intracutaneous hepatitis B vaccination with the total dosage of 6 μg. An anti-HBs titer elevation (21-100 IU/ml) was observed in 15 cases (68.18%). In those cases, where we failed to achieve successful immunity, we identified malignancies, immunosuppression, amyloidosis, psoriasis diabetes mellitus, or coeliac disease as a possible reason. Conclusions: The rate of successful immunisations against HBV infections can be improved by means of intracutaneous vaccination. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Changes in infectology over the past two decades]

SZALKA András

[Infectious diseases and various infections are the major causes of morbidity and mortality in developing as well as in industrialised countries. Despite the advances in the past decades in our understanding of microbes, efficient treatment of diseases and preventive approaches, more than 13 million people die every year due to infectious diseases. In the past two decades, more and more new pathogens and infections diseases have been emerging and old diseases that were almost forgotten have re-emerged. There are many new diseases for which we do not have or have hardly any efficient antimicrobial drugs and no efficient vaccines. Despite an increasing frequency of multi- and panresistant microbes, the development of new antibiotics to be used against these infections is unlikely to occur in the near future. The big pharmaceutical companies have stopped the research of antibiotics. In this situation, the only option we have is to use antibiotics rationally and to take prevention and control of infections seriously, both in the outpatient system and in hospitals. Preserving the effectiveness of currently used antibiotics is in everyone’s interest and is everyone’s responsibility.]