Hypertension and nephrology

[Ventricular arrhythmia]

ZÁMOLYI Károly

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

Hypertension and nephrology - 2020;24(4)

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Hypertension and nephrology

[Association between cyclothymic affective temperament and hypertension]

NEMCSIK János, BATTA Dóra, KŐRÖSI Beáta, RIHMER Zoltán

[Affective temperaments (cyclothymic, hypertymic, depressive, anxious, irritable) are stable parts of personality and after adolescent only their minor changes are detectable. Their connections with psychopathology is well-described; depressive temperament plays role in major depression, cyclothymic temperament in bipolar II disorder, while hyperthymic temperament in bipolar I disorder. Moreover, scientific data of the last decade suggest, that affective temperaments are also associated with somatic diseases. Cyclothymic temperament is supposed to have the closest connection with hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension is higher parallel with the presence of dominant cyclothymic affective temperament and in this condition the frequency of cardiovascular complications in hypertensive patients was also described to be higher. In chronic hypertensive patients cyclothymic temperament score is positively associated with systolic blood pressure and in women with the earlier development of hypertension. The background of these associations is probably based on the more prevalent presence of common risk factors (smoking, obesity, alcoholism) with more pronounced cyclothymic temperament. The scientific importance of the research of the associations of personality traits including affective temperaments with somatic disorders can help in the identification of higher risk patient subgroups.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Post-career development of cardiometabolic changes and hypertension in competitive athletes]

LELBACH Ádám, KÁNTOR Márk, KOLLER Ákos

[Regular physical activity is essential in delaying the aging processes (e.g. arterial remodelling – stiffening, metabolism, bodyweight), the beneficial effects of competitive sports – especially strength sports – according to the recent data of the literature are questionable. The beneficial effects of physical activity on the cardiovascular (CV) system are well known, however less is known regarding the delayed impacts of high intensity competitive sports on the CV system, especially after the sport career is over. This review summarizes the effects of active competitive sport and the post-career period on the cardiometabolic system with special attention to the systemic blood pressure and the development of metabolic syndrome. After sport career, the welldeveloped high performance cardiovascular- and metabolic system suddenly is much less used, but still supported by sport-level diet. It is well known that hypertension is a significant pathogenic factor in the development of cardiovascular diseases, characterized – among others – by reduced elasticity of large- and medium- sized vessels thereby importantly contributing to the development of systolic hypertension. Inflammation and thrombus formation both play an important role in the development of vascular injury and atherosclerosis. The increased tone of microvessels can impair the blood supply of certain organs, including the coronary circulation. It has been ample shown, that regular non-competitive, aerobic exercise activities are important factors in preventing hypertension. Such pathological changes become more evident after the development of post-career obesity, as well as the development of hypertension due to the activation of the renin-angiotensin system through sodium retention and other metabolic changes (increased glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, type II diabetes mellitus). It has been ample shown, that regular non-competitive, dynamic aerobic exercise activities are important factors in preventing hypertension. The frequency, intensity, type, and time (FITT) principle of exercise prescription is the first and common therapeutic approach, which represents the translation of cardiovascular basic science research results into hypertension treatment, thus can provide a personalized physical activity program/therapy according to medical needs not just for the post-career sportspersons, but the wide range of patients.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Continuing medical education]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Hyperkalaemia IV.]

DEÁK György, PATÓ Éva, KÉKES Ede

[The six-part summary presents the epidemiology, diagnosis, pathogenesis, and treatment of hyperkalaemia.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Non-pharmacological treatment of hypertension and reducing cardiovascular risk in general practitioners’ clusters]

MOHOS András, KOZMA Anna, MARKÓ-KUCSERA Mária, MESTER Lajos

[Hypertension and cardiovascular diseases are major public health issues. In their treatment non-pharmacological methods have a role in every case either alone or as a complement. Patient adherence is a key factor. The role of primary care is very important in the management and with general practitioners’ cluster model and with the involvement of new primary care professionals (for example: dietetitian, physiotherapist) the opportunities are expanding. In the A GP Cluster and in the Marosmenti GP Cluster the analysis of the patients’ results who participated in an individual health status examination, in dietetic and in physiotherapy services. Assessing the professionals’ attitudes towards GP cluster model. In the A GP Cluster 2409 people, in the Marosmenti GP Cluster 1826 people participated in an individual health status examination. 14.6% and 19.9% of the participants were under the age of 18. 58.9% and 60.7% of the participants over the age of 18 were female. 1083 and 232 patients used physiotherapy services, 147 and 187 people used dietetic services. The age distribution of the individual health status examinations is correspond to the Hungarian age pyramid. In addition to the preventive approach came into view the community based local health care services. The GP cluster model was welcomed by the patients, the physiotherapy was more popular than dietetic among them. All professionals of the GP clusters had a positive opinion of the professional work done in the project. Conclusion: There is a demand both from the patients and the healthcare professionals for the GP cluster concept. The establishing of an appropriate monitoring system and creating long-term, sustainable operating conditions are essential for achieving lasting social health gains. ]

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Clinical Neuroscience

Effects of valproate, carbamazepine and levetiracetam on Tp-e interval, Tp-e/QT and Tp-e/QTc ratio

YASAR Altun, ERDOGAN Yasar

Aim - To evaluate P-wave dispersion before and after antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment as well as to investigate the risk of ventricular repolarization using the Tpeak-Tend (Tp-e) interval and Tp-e/QT ratio in patients with epileptic disorder. Methods - A total of 63 patients receiving AED therapy and 35 healthy adults were included. ECG recordings were obtained before and 3 months after anti-epileptic treatment among patients with epilepsy. For both groups, Tp-e and Tp-e/QT ratio were measured using a 12-lead ECG device. Results - Tp-e interval, Tpe/QT and Tp-e/QTc ratios were found to be higher in the patient group than in the control group (p<0.05, for all), while QTmax ratio was significantly lower in the patient group. After 3 months of AED therapy, significant increases in QT max, QTc max, QTcd, Tp-e, Tp-e/QT, and Tp-e/QTc were found among the patients (p<0.05). When the arrhythmic effects of the drugs before and after treatment were compared, especially in the valproic acid group, there were significant increases in Tp-e interval, Tp-e/QT and Tp-e/QTc values after three months of treatment (p<0.05). Carbamazepine and levetiracetam groups were not statistically significant in terms of pre- and post-treatment values. Conclusions - It was concluded that an arrhythmogenic environment may be associated with the disease, and patients who received AED monotherapy may need to be followed up more closely for arrhythmia.

Hypertension and nephrology

[Hypertension and atrial fibrillation. Part 2. Basic methods of screening atrial fibrillation]

KÉKES Ede

[Early detection of PF, especially short-term “paroxysmal aritmia”, is very important primarily in older individuals (over 65 ys), especially those with heart disease, hypertension or diabetes. Two methods are known for the early detection of PF: In one (regular screening) making 12-lead ECG examination for individuals over the age of 65 at fix times. The other (opportunistic screening) means that every person over the age of 65, whenever he or she percieves any complains, the physician will experience the pulse of the patient and in case of arrhythmia the EKG is made.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Effects of metabolic modulation by trimetazidine on left ventricular function and phosphocreatine/ adenosine triphosphate ratio in patients with heart failure]

HERCZEG Béla

Hypertension and nephrology

[Hypertension and atrial fibrillation]

SZŐKE Vince Bertalan, BARACSI-BOTOS Viktória, JÁRAI Zoltán

[Hypertension is the most important independent risk factor of atrial fibrillation, the most common clinically significant arrhythmia. Increased atrial wall tension, myocardium remodelling, activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and fibrotic remodelling are possible hypertension induced mechanisms which can contribute to developing atrial fibrillation. Knowing the relation of hypertension to atrial fibrillation is crucial in the need for effective and up-to-date therapeutic strategies. RAAS inhibitors and beta blockers prevent atrial fibrillation not only by lowering blood pressure but partly due to the inhibition of the above mentioned mechanisms. Complications of hypertension, such as left ventricular hypertrophy and hypertensive cardiomyopathy are substantially limiting the number of drugs that can be used for rhythm control. In most cases in the presence of hypertension initiation of anticoagulation therapy is necessary too.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Efficacy of anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists in acut stroke patients with atrial fibrillation - Hungarian results]

SAS Attila, CSONTOS Krisztina, LOVÁSZ Rita, VALIKOVICS Attila

[Background and objective - An estimated 20% of ischemic strokes are of cardiogenic origin, half of which is associated with atrial fibrillation (AF). Anticoagulation treatment of patients with this arrhythmia reduces their risk of stroke. Effectiveness and safety of oral anticoagulant therapy with vitamin K antagonists (VKA) is limited, however, by their well-known narrow therapeutic window and the substantial inter- and intraindividual variability of INR values depending on genetic and dietary factors as well as drug interactions. Our objective was to evaluate the prevalence of adequate anticoagulation and the level of anticoagulant effect actually achieved among patients with AF hospitalized for acute stroke. Methods - Patients with AF admitted to our hospital ward in 2012 for acute stroke (n=226) were included in the analysis. Using descriptive statistics, relevant clinical and therapeutic characteristics of the patients were assessed, with special reference to the INR values on admission (among patients with known AF), and the clinical outcomes. Results - Of the study cohort, 170 patients had a diagnosis of AF before the admission for stroke, but 47% of them did not take anticoagulants. Patients who suffered stroke while on anticoagulants (83 on VKA, 7 on low-molecular-weight heparins), were in most cases (75%) out of the therapeutic INR range, typically undertreated (INR<2). Overall, inadequate or completely absent anticoagulation was documented in 81% of the stroke cases occurring in patients with known AF. Of the entire study cohort, 41% was discharged home, 34% required continued institutional care, and 25% died. Conclusions - The inadequacy or lack of anticoagulation was observed in the vast majority of acute strokes in patients with known AF. These cases are often related to the well-documented limitations of VKA therapy in terms of its safety, tolerability and/or practical aspects. To prevent them, important changes are warranted in the anticoagulation practice, including the closer control of VKA therapy and the broader use of new oral anticoagulants.]