Hypertension and nephrology

[The role of stress management in the care of hypertension and the treatment of cardiovascular disease]

SOMOGYI Éva1, KISS Zoltán2, STAUDER Adrienne3

NOVEMBER 04, 2020

Hypertension and nephrology - 2020;24(05)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.33668/hn.24.019

Review

[The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the relationship between stress and hypertension and cardiovascular diseases, furthermore to introduce an evidence based stress management intervention available in Hungary. The correlation between cardiovascular disease and psychosocial factors (including concomitant mental disorders as well as personality traits or the effect of social environment) has been established in numerous studies aimed at investigating pathogenesis or various clinical endpoints. The 2016 Guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology include the assessment and the management of psychosocial problems with behavioral medicine interventions as a I.A level recommendation. The implementation of these guidelines in everyday clinical practice is crucial to decrease cardiovascular risk. This involves the training of health care professionals, the facilitation of multidisciplinary collaboration and the integration of behavioral intervention into everyday care. The Williams Life Skills (WLS) program is an evidence based behavioral medicine intervention aiming to improve stress management and communication skills which implemented internationally and also available all over Hungary. It involves the learning of simple coping strategies that facilitate the successful management of every day psychosocial stress situations and the self-conscious reduction of bodily and psychological tensions. In cardiovascular disease, this improves quality of life and survival. The WLS program is especially recommended for healthcare workers to decrease the negative health consequences of their high stress load and to prevent burnout. Stress may affect both doctors and patients during their interactions. Bálint groups have a positive impact on the physician-patient collaboration and help to reduce burnout by improving the understanding of the diseases from a more complex approach.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Spitalregion Fürstenland Toggenburg; Medicard 99 Egészségügyi Szolgáltató Betéti Társaság, Eger
  2. Szent Imre Egyetemi Oktatókórház, Hipertónia-Nefrológia, Budapest
  3. Semmelweis Egyetem, Magatartástudományi Intézet, Budapest

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