Hypertension and nephrology

[Sándor Gerő, the researcher clinician (1904-1992)]

GÁCS János

MAY 20, 2012

Hypertension and nephrology - 2012;16(02)

[Sándor Gerő presents two theories concerning the origin of atherosclerosis. The first one is called “primary lipid infiltration concept” which means the penetration of high concentration plasma lipids into the arterial wall without its damage. The other theory for the origin of atherosclerosis is primary damage of the vascular wall (namely of fibers, mucopolysaccharid etc.) which is followed by lipid infiltration. In the literature it is named “primary vascular concept” of atherosclerosis. The author investigates the two possibilities with experimental and clinical methods and concludes that primary vascular damage is more probable to be the origin of atherosclerosis.]

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[Gender differencies in coronary reactivity in angiotensin II hypertension rat model]

MÁTRAI Máté, NÁDASY György L, HETHÉSSY Judit, SZEKERES Mária, MONOS Emil, SZÉKÁCS Béla, VÁRBÍRÓ Szabolcs

[It is known that hypertension shows several gender specific elements both in pathogenesis and in therapy. Understanding this phenomenon may bring us closer to individualized therapy. That was the reason why we examined process of hypertensive adaptation on the level of small intramural coronary arteries. 10-10 male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. Animals received osmotic pumps in anaesthesia, which emitted 100 ng/bwkg/min angiotensin II acetate for four weeks. After four weeks treatment, animals were sacrified and heart weights were measured. We isolated intramural, small branches of the left anterior descendant coronary artery, placed them into vessel chamber and tested biomechanical properties and pharmacological reactivity. Heart weight and wall thickness were higher in females comparing to males. However, basal vascular tone and thromboxane-mediated vasoconstriction were elevated in males. Bradykinin relaxation was bigger in females. In female animals inward eutrophic remodeling was found, while in males increased wall stress and elastic moduli dominated the adaptation process. In conclusion, initial steps of angiotensin II mediated hypertension induced markedly gender dependent alterations.]

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[Kidney transplantation provides the best outcomes, concerning morbidity, mortality and health related quality of life for patients with end stage renal disease. Health related quality of life is increasingly recognized as an important outcome measure in patients with different chronic medical conditions, including chronic kidney disease. Sleep disorders, such as insomnia, sleep apnea syndrome and restless legs syndrome are common in patients with chronic kidney disease. The prevalence of insomnia and restless legs syndrome is similar in kidney transplanted patients to the prevalence observed in the general population. On the other hand, the prevalence of sleep apnea is considerably higher, about 30%. The association between sleep disorders and impaired health related quality of life has been relatively well documented in dialysis patients but only scarce information has been published about the kidney transplanted population. In this paper we summarize published data about sleep disorders and also about their association with health related quality of life in the kidney transplanted population.]

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