Hypertension and nephrology

[Remembering Professor István Czuriga MD]

KÉKES Ede, FARSANG Csaba, KISS István

APRIL 20, 2018

Hypertension and nephrology - 2018;22(02)

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Hypertension and nephrology

[Role of β-blockers, especially carvedilol in the treatment of hypertension]

PÁLL Dénes, MARODA László, ZRÍNYI Miklós

[Changes in hypertension guidelines in the past years have affected the clinical thinking about β-blockers. Authors reviewed the development of β-blockers emphasizing the differences across various active pharmaceutical agents. Different hemodynamic and metabolic effects are being discussed in details for the third ge - neration vasodilatator carvedilol. Carvedilol has no effect on cardiac output but decreases peripheral vascular resistance which results in lower blood pressure values. However, carvedilol, opposite to unfavorable effects of traditional β-blockers, has a neutral impact on both carbohydrate and lipid metabolisms. Its more advanced cardiac effects include decreased left ventricular hypertrophy and increased coronary flow reserve. Vasodilatator type β-blockers (carvedilol, nebivolol) are indicated in the combi - nation treatment of hypertension, especially when the patient has heart failure, coronary disease or suffered from a previous heart attack.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[A Letter to Our Readers]

KÉKES Ede, KISS István

Hypertension and nephrology

[Alberto Zanchetti]

FARSANG Csaba, JÁRAI Zoltán, KÉKES Ede, KISS István

Hypertension and nephrology

[Cholesterol-lowering is not the Holy Grail, but neither is the work of the devil]

BAJNOK László

[Cholesterol-lowering statins are the most tested medications in respect of the effects and side-effects. Based on these, we can safely claim that most of the negative opinions about cholesterol-lowering are not realistic. It is not a panacea, but it is proven that around a 30% of cardio- and cerebrovascular risk reducation can be achieved by their regular taking, while the incidence of side effects and risks are at least one order of magnitude lower in each patient groups. For cholesterol, there is no “normal” lab threshold or low level, only “target values”, since the mean value in the general population is high in regard of atherosclerosis (the values measured at birth and among natural people can be considered normal). Let us appreciate the cholesterol- lowering medications because we do not have a large armamentarium!]

Hypertension and nephrology

[The Editors Ask, the Expert Responds]

CSÁSZÁR Albert

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Clinical Neuroscience

Neurocognitive functions in patients with hepatitis C infection

HORVÁTH Gergely, KELETI Teodóra, MAKARA Mihály, UNGVARI S Gabor, GAZDAG Gábor

Background - With improving treatment options, more attention is being paid to the neurocognitive symptoms related to hepatitis C infection (HCI). While HCI-related neurocognitive impairments are frequently subclinical, they can influence patients’ quality of life and fitness to work. Objective - The aim of this study was to assess HCI patients’ neurocognitive functions and explore the correlations between disease variables and neurocognitive symptoms. Method - The study was conducted between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2015. All patients with HCI were included in the study who were registered at the Hepatology Outpatient Clinic of Szent István and Szent László Hospitals, met inclusion criteria and volunteered to participate. Patients’ sociodemographic data and medical history were recorded in a questionnaire designed for the study. The 21-item Beck Depression Inventory was used to detect depressive symptoms. Six computerized tests were used to evaluate patients’ neuropsychological functions. Results - Sixty patients participated in the study. In comparison with general population standards, patients demonstrated poorer performance in several neurocognitive tests. Neuropsychological performance was correlated with age, sex, length of time since HCI diagnosis, Fibroscan score and the number of previous antiviral treatments. Conclusions - The study’s main finding is that compared to general population standards, patients with hepatitis C virus-related disease exhibit impaired neuropsychological functioning in visuomotor and visuospatial functions, working memory, executive functions, and reaction time. Executive functions and reaction time were the most sensitive indicators for the length and severity of disease. Deterioration in these functions has a major negative effect on work performance particularly in certain occupations.