Hypertension and nephrology

[Physical training in dialysis population]

SCHNEIDER Károly

SEPTEMBER 12, 2018

Hypertension and nephrology - 2018;22(04)

[The impaired physical activity and the related increased cardiovascular risk is caracteristic in all stages of chronic kidney diseases. The regular physical activity has a beneficial effect on the metabolic risks associated with chronic kidney disease, dialysis and poor activity lifestyle, it also has favorable effect on the inflammatory state, poor physical performance, muscle loss and can improve the quality of life and life expectancy. Accordingly, the international and Hungarian guidelines suggest at least 150 minutes physical activity with moderate intensity per week - at least five days, 30 minutes each day. But there are no particular guidelines for dialysated patients. This article, without being exhaustive, in part using our own experiences, present suggestions for the physical activity of dialysated patients.]

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Hypertension and nephrology

[Hyperuricemia and cardiovascular risk: new treat to target principle in focus]

ALFÖLDI Sándor

[Hyperuricemia is frequent and its prevalence is increasing as it correlates with obesity and metabolic syndrome by several different mechanisms. Furthermore, recently several data are available for the cardiovascular and renal protective effect of allopurinol in the treatment of hyperuricemia and gout. The new European EULAR guidelines suggested treat to target principle in urat lowering therapy of gout. The uric acid target is below 360 µmol/l in mild to moderate gout. The guidelines unequivocally stated, that allopurinol is the first line uric acid lowering drug. Allopurinol treatment should be started immediately at the diagnosis and should be continued lifelong.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Letter to our Readers]

KÉKES Ede

Hypertension and nephrology

[Article Reports]

VÁLYI Péter

Hypertension and nephrology

[Hungary’s anthropometric position based on national public health screening (2010-2017). Data and correlation analysis - Part I.]

KÉKES Ede, BARNA István, DAIKI Tenno, Dankovics Gergely, †KISS István

[The aim of the study is to present a Hungarian anthropometric profile on a full-scale basis (body mass, BMI, waist circumference, waist/hip ratio, percentage of body fat, abdominal fat mass) based on the data of the “Nationwide Comprehensive Health Screening Program in Hungary 2010-2020” collected over 8 years. In the analysis we processed 70,094 women and 67,549 men. We found, that in the Hungarian society, overweight and obesity was on the rise between 2010 and 2017, and beyond 2014 its rate was ever higher. Growth of body fat and abdominal fat is characteristic for both sexes, but abdominal obesity in relative terms of waist size, waist/hip ratio and percentage of body fat is significantly higher in morbid obese women. The fact is particularly worrying that these growth trends are already present in age groups of 18-26. These signs warn us definitely that we need to take a greater part in influencing the lifestyle, eating habits of individuals and in the promotion of physical activity.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[The new European ESH/ESC guidelines Part I. Most important changes and cardiovascular risk]

FARSANG Csaba

[The most important features of the new European joint hypertension guidelines of the European Society of Hypertension (ESH) and European Society of Cardiology (ESC) became available aslectures at the ESH meeting in Barcelona, in 2018 June, while the publication came out in the Journal of Hypertension and also in the European Heart Journal in August, 2018. Based on the published new guidelines I summarise the most important changes concerning cardiovascular risks and target blood pressures.]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

Risk factors for ischemic stroke and stroke subtypes in patients with chronic kidney disease

GÜLER Siber, NAKUS Engin, UTKU Ufuk

Background - The aim of this study was to compare ischemic stroke subtypes with the effects of risk factors, the relationship between grades of kidney disease and the severity of stroke subtypes. Methods - The current study was designed retrospectively and performed with data of patients who were hospitalised due to ischemic stroke. We included 198 subjects who were diagnosed with ischemic stroke of Grade 3 and above with chronic kidney disease. Results - In our study were reported advanced age, coronary artery disease, moderate kidney disease as the most frequent risk factors for cardioembolic etiology. Hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking and alcohol consumption were the most frequent risk factors for large-artery disease. Female sex and anaemia were the most frequent risk factors for small-vessel disease. Dialysis and severe kidney disease were the most frequent risk factors in unknown etiologies, while male sex, diabetes mellitus, prior stroke and mild kidney disease were the most frequent risk factors for other etiologies. National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores were lower for small-vessel disease compared with other etiologies. This relation was statistically significant (p=0.002). Conclusion - In order to improve the prognosis in ischemic stroke with chronic kidney disease, the risk factors have to be recognised and the treatment options must be modified according to those risk factors.

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Diseases of the kidneys due to non-cancer mortality characteristics of Hungary between 2005-2014]

PAKSY András, KISS István

[The authors review the time of 10 years between 2005-2014 concerning the development of the mortality rate of kidney diseases in Hungary. They’ve compared the Hungarian mortality data with the ones from three other countries, namely Austria, the Czech Republic and Germany. The analyses included kidney diseases originated from hypertension, glomerulonephritis and tubulointerstitial kidney diseases, kidney failure and polycystic kidney diseases. They weren’t concerned about kidney tumors or diabetes originated kidney diseases because of the lack of data concerning the latter. The mortality data were retrieved from the KSH Demography Yearbook and the European Detailed Mortality Data-base (DMDB). The statistically examined causes of death only add up to 1.2% of the total causes of death, but with the aging of the population this proportion will surely grow. During the last 10 years, the mortality of cardiovascular diseases decreased significantly, namely the mortality of ischaemic heart disease and stroke, but the mortality of hypertension increased. These processes can also be seen in Austria, the Czech Republic and Germany. The mortality connected to primal kidney diseases decisively concerns people aged over 70. The glomerular diseases’ standardized rate is significantly higher in Hungary than in the compared countries. The tubulointerstitial kidney diseases’ mortality rate decreased over the last 10 years and we are in the middle of the international field in this regard. During the evaluation of the mortality of kidney diseases it is important to consider that in the statistics every death can only have one cause nominated, which can be (correctly) the basic disease causing the kidney disease or in other cases the kidney disease itself. This problem makes it more difficult to compare data internationally. Only 20-30 patients die of acute kidney disease on a yearly basis which is a low mortality rate even by international standards but the above-mentioned problem still exists. Of all of them the chronic kidney disease is the most significant one and between 2005-2014 the number of deaths and their rate connected to it decreased, but with the aging of the population the morbidity of kidney diseases will surely increase. Analyzing the data of all the primer kidney diseases it can be determined that between 2005-2014 the mortality rate showed a decreasing tendency, so our international situation can be viewed positively. It is important to note though that the mortality of this disease type includes patients of lower average age in Hungary than in the more developed countries. The mortality rate of polycystic kidney disease hasn’t changed significantly during the past 10 years. Although some patients live to many years, the average age of the dead is significantly lower compared to the ones of other kidney disease types. The cases below the age of 1 year of the latter add up to 10%. The comparison between the countries concerning the po­lycystic kidney disease shows that the standardized mortality rate is higher in Hun­gary.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Practical aspects of therapy by erythropoiesis stimulating agents in renal anaemia]

DEÁK György, HERSZÉNYI Eszter, AMBRUS Csaba, KISS István

[Prevalence of renal anaemia due to insufficient production of erythropoietin increases progressively in the course of renal function deterioration. Renal anaemia is treated by erythropoesis stimulating agents (ESA). Outcomes of randomized clinical trials have taught us to avoid the strategy of normalization of hemoglobin (HGB) levels by ESA therapy as it may increase the risk of cardiovascular events and mortality. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Clinical Practice Guideline for Anaemia published in 2012 recommends to start ESA therapy in the 90-100 g/l HGB range and suggests to keep HGB concentrations below 115 g/l. It is an inappropriate strategy to aim at normalizing hemoglobin (HGB) levels by ESA therapy because it may lead to progressive escalation of ESA doses even in the presence of diminished ESA responsiveness. High ESA doses and diseases causing ESA hyporesponsiveness eg. infections, chronic inflammation, malnutrition, insufficient dose of dialysis, severe hyperparathyroidism, iron deficiency are related to increased risk of mortality. KDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline for Anaemia emphasizes the importance of assessing and treating causes of ESA hyporesponsiveness, limits ESA dose escalation and recommends gradually changing ESA doses to avoid high amplitude HGB oscillation.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Chronic kidney disease and atherosclerosis]

REIBER István

[Accelerated cardiovascular disease is a frequent complication of chronic kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease promotes hypertension and dyslipidaemia, which in turn can contribute to the progression of renal failure. Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of renal failure. Hypertension, dyslipidaemia and diabetes together are the major risk factors of the development of endothelial dysfunction and progression of atherosclerosis. Inflammatory mediators are often elevated and the renin-angiotensin system is frequently activated in chronic kidney disease. Promoters of calcification are increased and inhibitors are reduced, which favors vascular calcification, an important cause of vascular injury associated with end-stage renal disease. Accelerated atherosclerosis will then lead to increased prevalence of coronary artery disease, heart failure, stroke and peripheral arterial disease.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[New agents in the therapy of hyperkalaemia]

PATÓ Éva, DEÁK György

[Serum potassium level higher than 5,5 mmol/l denotes hyperkalemia that becomes severe above 7,5 mmol/l being a potentially life threatening condition due to ventricular arrythmias. It may develop as a consequence of high potassium intake, decreased renal excretion, and extracellular potassium shift. Its treatment is a challenge even nowadays especially in the setting of chronic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, and heart failure where RAAS inhibion is an essential component of the therapy. Sodium polystyrene sulfonate, an ion exchange resin is applied for more than fifty years. Recently new angents, patiromer and sodium zirconium cyclosylicate (ZS-9) were introduced and available results show a safer, more tolerable and predicatble effect. Efficiency of patiromer to reduce hyperkalemia is verified in clinical trials in patients with chronic kidney disease, or diabetes mellitus, or hypertension or heart failure on RAAS inhibitor therapy.]