Hypertension and nephrology

[Physical activity, physical function and exercise in chronic kidney disease]

NAGY Judit, APOR Péter, KISS István

FEBRUARY 20, 2014

Hypertension and nephrology - 2014;18(01-02)

[This review summarize the decreased physical activity and physical function of chronic kidney disease patients from the early stage of their renal disease; the favourable effects of exercise training on physical activity and function as well as on progression of chronic renal diseases. At the end, there is a recommendation for implementation of exercise in this renal patient population. The conclusion is that, on the basis of the evidences patients with chronic renal disease should be advised to increase their physical activity in all stages of their renal disea]

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