Hypertension and nephrology

[Paradigmal changes in renal replacement therapy. Dialysis and drug therapy of quality in chronic renal patients - Optimal and adequate opportunities of dialysis therapy]

KISS István, SZEGEDI János, FODOR Erzsébet, BARABÁS Noémi, REMPORT Ádám, AMBRUS Csaba, KULCSÁR Imre

MARCH 22, 2013

Hypertension and nephrology - 2013;17(01)

[Researches over the past thirty years, many results have been related to acute and chronic renal failure pathophysiology, clinical characteristics and therapy. Can be more than just the uremic toxins and their characteristics of the regulation of salt and water balance, renal anemia treatment, uremic metabolic disorders, calcium phosphate and lipid metabolism dysfunction. Improve the quality of treatment and reduce mortality and options can be influenced by factors come to, therefore, execution and technique of dialysis therapy. We know the primary concern of the treatment period for reducing mortality. This is best for intermittent treatments increased (4.5-6 hours) treatment will help. Narrow scope is optional for the treatment several times a week treatment, the daily 8-hour long nightly therapy. The mortality of the patient significantly influenced by age, gender, co-morbidities, fluid balance and the CaxPO4. The technical side is the key factor influencing the dialysis fluid purity and membrane properties. The use of high-flux membranes is clearly improving the quality of treatment, the additional benefit of hemodiafiltration therapy, the mortality for those still controversial. For optimal dialysis adequacy, complexity may result in reducing mortality and improving the quality of life in chronic dialysis patients.]

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Hypertension and nephrology

[The success of fixed combined amlodipine/atorvastatin (Amlator®) therapy in patients with hypertension and dyslipidemia]

KÉKES Ede

[In total 2606 patients with hypertension and dyslipidemia got combined antihypertensive and antilipid-treatment. The main component of therapy was amlodipine/ atorvastatin fixed combination in different dose variations. The goal of the study was to access optimal target blood pressure and lipid profile. The baseline average blood pressure value was 155.9/90.18 mmHg and it decreased to 132.77/80.04 mmHg during the six months therapy. The lipid profile also changed successfully: the average value of total cholesterol decreased from 5.97 mmol/l to 4.68 mmol/l, LDL cholesteron from 3.45 mmol/l to 2.49 mmol/l and serum triglyceride from 2.1 mmol/l to 1.69 mmol/l. We reached the target values in respect of LDL cholesterol (<2.5 mmol/l) and of triglyceride (<1.7 mmol/l) prescribed in guidelines for subjects with high cardiovascular risk. According to the global cardiovascular risk estimation (European Heart Score) the risk ratio in percent was significantly decreased in each age group, in both genders and in smoking or nonsmoking subjects.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[The beginning and difficulties of peritoneal dialysis at the end of the last century - Part I. International experiences]

KARÁTSON András

[The theoretical background of peritoneal dialysis dates back to the 18th and 19th century. It was in 1923 when the first experimental and clinical experiences were summarised by Ganter from Munich. Of the Hungarian researchers Stephen Rosenak’s name can be mentioned, who was working in this field in Bonn in 1926 and later in London and New York. Obstacles to the spread of this treatment method was the lack of appropriate abdominal catheters, biocompatible solutions and equipment. The intermittent technique of the method was time consuming and, due to the conditions of that time, peritonitis frequently developed. The spread of the method was facilitated by the catheter constructed by Tenchkoff towards the end of the 1960s, the automatization of the treatment and later continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) described by Popovich and Moncrief. Further development of the method became possible by the use of the two-litre plastic bags instead of the bottled solution and later a twin-bag system employing the “flush before fill” technique. The occurrence of peritonitis developing during the treatment gradually decreased, in which Stephen I. Vas of Hungarian origin, working in Toronto as a professor of microbiology played an important role by constantly improving and modifying the principles of the therapy. Besides the infection in the abdominal cavity the bioincompatibility of the dialysis fluid presented another problem, which was solved by the use of essential amino acids, icodextrin instead of glucose and bicarbonate instead of lactate. By the turn of the century it became clear that the survival rate of peritoneal dialysis is very similar to that of hemodialysis in the second and third years following the treatment, while in relation to the quality of life it proved to be better. This observation has been proved in numerous clinical studies in the past decade and has been refined with regard to patients’ age, their primary and accompanying diseases. It is my intention to give account of the Hungarian experiences with peritoneal dialysis in the second part.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Scientific Programs of the Hungarian Society of Hypertension Characteristics of Hungarian Hypertensive Patients According to the Hungarian Society of Hypertension Registry and the Program “Live Below 140/90” ]

KÉKES Ede, KERKOVITS Lóránt, BÖDÖR Anikó, KISS István

Hypertension and nephrology

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Hypertension and nephrology

[Causes of and therapeutic opportunities in resistant hypertension]

SIMONYI Gábor, GENCSI Kristína

[Hypertension is an independent cardiovascular risk factor and one of the most frequent diseases in Hungary. In the treatment of hypertensive patients usually more than two drugs are needed for the appropriate blood pressure control. Resistant hypertension (RH) is defined when blood pressure remains above target value despite full doses of antihypertensive medications, which consist of at least three different classes of drugs including a diuretic administered in maximal doses. The frequency of RH can reach 20-30% among hypertensive patients. RH increases the cardiovascular risk because of the lack of target blood pressure. RH is multifactorial and it is important to exclude pseudo-resistant hypertension (e.g. poor compliance, white coat effect). In the background of RH we can find lifestyle factors (e.g. obesity, excessive salt intake, alcoholism, etc.) and a variety of drugs (e.g. non-steroids, corticosteroids, sympathomimetics). In the pathogenesis of RH the increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system has an important role. In the treatment of RH we should manage lifestyle factors and it is important to assess the drugs and diseases (e.g. sleep apnea, chronic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus) which may cause increased blood pressure. It is no exact recommendations for the treatment of RH. Therapy often consists of 4-5 various drugs in combination. An important role has the device therapy of RH in recent years (e.g. stimulation of the carotid baroreceptors and renal denervation) as well.]

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[How long the colorectal cancer should be treated?]

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[Colorectal cancer is one of the leading cancer-related death worldwide. The optimal treatment duration of metastatic colorectal cancer depends on the individual treatment aim and it should be decided by an onco-team and by the patient. In this review several actual issues will be discussed, like the optimal duration of therapy to reach the secondary resection, the accepted response rate and best treatment strategy in case of non-operable colorectal cancer. Furthermore, emphasis is given to the most useful endpoints to evaluate different therapeutic approaches.]

Clinical Neuroscience

The evaluation of the relationship between risk factors and prognosis in intracerebral hemorrhage patients

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Objective - Patients were assessed in terms of risk factors, hematoma size and localization, the effects of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) on mortality and morbidity, and post-stroke depression. Materials and methods - The present study evaluated the demographic data, risk factors, and neurological examinations of 216 ICH patients. The diagnosis, volume, localization, and ventricular extension of the hematomas were determined using computed tomography scans. The mortality rate through the first 30 days was evaluated using ICH score and ICH grading scale. The Modified Rankin Scale (mRS) was used to determine the dependency status and functional recovery of each patient, and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale was administered to assess the psychosocial status of each patient. Results - The mean age of the patients was 65.3±14.5 years. The most common locations of the ICH lesions were as follows: lobar (28.3%), thalamus (26.4%), basal ganglia (24.0%), cerebellum (13.9%), and brainstem (7.4%). The average hematoma volume was 15.8±23.8 cm3; a ventricular extension of the hemorrhage developed in 34.4% of the patients, a midline shift in 28.7%, and perihematomal edema, as the most frequently occurring complication, in 27.8%. Over the 6-month follow-up period, 57.9% of patients showed a poor prognosis (mRS: ≥3), while 42.1% showed a good prognosis (mRS: <3). The mortality rate over the first 30 days was significantly higher in patients with a low Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score at admission, a large hematoma volume, and ventricular extension of the hemorrhage (p=0.0001). In the poor prognosis group, the presence of moderate depression (39.13%) was significantly higher than in the good prognosis group (p=0.0001). Conclusion - Determination and evaluation of the factors that could influence the prognosis and mortality of patients with ICH is crucial for the achievement of more effective patient management and improved quality of life.

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[SUDDEN DEATH AND MORTALITY IN EPILEPSY]

SZŰCS Anna, LALIT Narula, RÁSONYI György, BARCS Gábor, BÓNÉ Beáta, HALÁSZ Péter, JANSZKY József

[Mortality in epilepsy is 2-3 times higher than in the age- and sex-matched general population. It is the highest in young male epilepsy patients with generalised tonic-clonic seizures living in low socio-economical situation. The main factors of early mortality unrelated to seizures are the neurological conditions underlying epilepsy. Suicide is an important factor first of all in temporal lobe epilepsy. The group of mortality directly related to epilepsy is made up of the high-mortality grand mal status epilepticus rarely seen in treated epilepsy; the accidents related to seizures and sudden unexpected death (SUDEP). The reasons directly related to epilepsy make up about 40 per cent of epilepsy mortality. There is a 20-24-fold increase of the risk of sudden death in epilepsy compared to sudden death in the general population. The main risk of SUDEP is the “severity” of epilepsy signaled by generalized tonic-clonic seizures, resistance to antiepileptic drugs, polytherapy and frequent drug-modifications in adulthood epilepsy. Seizure-dependent autonomic changes as cardiac rhythm and breathing disturbances as well as some antiepileptic drugs and treatment modifications may contribute to the development of SUDEP. The data suggest that the main tools helping to decrease mortality in epilepsy nowadays are as follows: optimal seizure control, effective tratment of concomitant psychiatric conditions and monitoring for potentially dangerous heart dysrhythmias as well as respiration disorders.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[County level mortality data of urogenital system in Hungary between 2010-2014]

KISS István, PAKSY András

[According to The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (10th Revision, ICD 10; XIV), urogenital diseases resulted in an average 910 yearly deaths in Hungary from 2010 through 2014, less than 1% of the cumulative mortality rate. Out of all urogenital conditions, kidney and bladder diseases were the leading cause of death, accounting for nearly 85 percent of all deaths in the examined period. It should be noted that mortality due to urogenital cancers, renovascular hypertonia, diabetic nephropathy, congenital malformations and pathologies related to childbirth and pregnancy are excluded from consideration in the present review. As the Hungarian Central Statistical Office does not disclose the causes of death by age and gender at its county-level data, this paper reports gender-specific mortality rates. Due to the fact that the county-level mortality rate of urogenital diseases is low and the yearly standard deviation is high, the five-year overall mortality rate of 2010-2014 is presented. Hungarian counties differ greatly in terms of mortality from urogenital diseases. The number of deaths per 100 000 population ranges between 6.74 in Békés county and 16.38 in Fejér county. Counties within the same region may exhibit substantially different mortality rates. An overall 7.01 deaths per 100 000 population was reported in Győr-Moson-Sopron county, whereas among residents of the neighbouring Vas county the rate was reported as 14.73 per 100 000 population. The observed variations prevail even when standardised mortality rates are compared and thus the differences in the counties’ age distributions are accounted for. Regional differences become more apparent when only the deaths caused by kidney diseases are analysed out of all urogenital pathologies. In this case, two- or threefold differences are observed between the respective Hungarian counties. Major disparities are still present between counties within the same region. For example, the number of deaths per 100.000 population is 3.74 in Hajdú-Bihar county, and 8.04 in Jász-Nagykun-Szolnok county, respectively. The diagnosis frequency of kidney diseases has a strong positive correlation with case fatality, but it may not fully account for all regional variations in mortality rates. Regional characteristics of dialytic care and the accessibility of dialytic facilities is not related to patient mortality. ]

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[Efficiency of osteoporosis treatment in Hungary - An analysis of the Hungarian National Insurance Company’s data]

LAKATOS Péter, TÓTH Emese, SZEKERES László, POÓR Gyula, HÉJJ Gábor, TAKÁCS István

[The treatment of osteoporosis and its consequences place a significant burden on the health care of developed countries. Modern therapeutical approaches are able to efficiently decrease the risk of osteoporotic bone fractures. However, we do not know whether the interventions introduced in the past 15 years have significantly reduced the number of osteoporotic fractures in real life, and if they have, how cost-effective this effect was. To answer these questions, we have analysed data of the Hungarian National Insurance Company collected between 2004-2010. During these 7 years, the number of bone fractures among patients treated for osteoporosis continuously decreased. This was also observed in the incidence of hip fractures. Interestingly, the mortality of osteoporotic patients was significantly lower than that of the same age group in the average population. Besides the efficient treatment of osteoporosis, this finding is also due to the outstanding general care provided by the specialised osteoporosis centers of the country. As a consequence of the reduction in fractures, 3.4 billion HUF was saved per year by the insurance company, which is approximately equal to the 3.5 billion HUF spent on the reimbursement of medicines used for the treatment of osteoporosis, which means that the investments show a return. The calculation of the quality- adjusted life years, which is the internationally accepted method of the WHO for the study of cost-effectiveness, shows that the above results were achieved in a remarkably cost-efficient way. At the same time, it is noteworthy and calls for caution that the decrease in reimbursement by the insurance company in 2007 resulted in a 51% drop in the number of patients receiving treatment, which radically reduced the observed efficiency.]