Hypertension and nephrology

[News of the Hungarian Society of Nephrology]

FEBRUARY 20, 2010

Hypertension and nephrology - 2010;14(01)

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Hypertension and nephrology

[Symptomes and genetics of nephronophthisis]

TORY Kálmán, VÁRKONYI Ildikó, BERNÁTH Mária, RÉMI Salomon, SOPHIE Saunier, MARIE-CLAIRE Gubler, CORINNE Antignac, TULASSAY Tivadar, REUSZ György

[Nephronophthisis is an autosomal recessive, chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy, responsible for 6-10% of childhood chronic renal failure cases. Its first symptoms, polyuria-polydipsia, anaemia and failure to thrive precede the development of end-stage renal disease by years. Increased echogenicity with loss of corticomedullary differentiation are the key findings on ultrasound, the lack of cysts does not rule out the diagnosis. Histologically, it is characterized by interstitial fibrosis and irregularities of the tubular basal membrane. Genetically, it is highly heterogeneous. Ten nephronophthisis genes have already been identified in 60% of the patients. The encoded proteins - similarly to other proteins mutated in cystic kidney diseases - are localized to primary cilium-basal body-centrosomal complex.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Study of attitude of dialysis patients to renal transplantation]

VÁMOS Eszter Panna, CSÉPÁNYI Gábor, MOLNÁR Miklós Zsolt, RÉTHELYI János, KOVÁCS Ágnes, MARTON Adrienn, NÉMETH Zsófia, NOVÁK Márta, MUCSI István

[Background: Treatment decisions made by patients with chronic kidney disease are crucial in the renal transplantation process. These decisions are influenced, amongst other factors, by attitudes towards different treatment options, which are modulated by knowledge and perceptions about the disease and its treatment and many other subjective factors. Here we study the attitude of dialysis patients to renal transplantation and the association of sociodemographic characteristics, patient perceptions, experiences with this attitude. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, all patients from eight dialysis units in Budapest, Hungary, who were on hemodialysis for at least three months were approached to complete a self-administered questionnaire. Data collected from 459 patients younger than 70 years were analyzed in this manuscript. Results: Mean age of the study population was 53±12 years, 54% was male, the prevalence of diabetes was 22%. Patients with positive attitude to renal transplantation were younger (51±11 vs. 58±11 years), better educated, more likely to be employed (11% vs. 4%) and had prior transplantation (15% vs. 7%) (p<0.05 for all). In a multivariate model negative patient perceptions about transplantation, negative expectations about health outcomes after transplantation, presence of fears about the transplant surgery were associated, in addition to increasing age, with unwillingness to consider transplantation. Conclusions: Negative attitudes to renal transplantation are associated with potentially modifiable factors. It would be necessary to develop standardized, comprehensible patient information systems and personalized decision support in order to facilitate modality selection and to enable patients to make fully informed treatment decisions.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Enjoyable and invisible risk: salt The role of the Hungarian Hypertension Society in the National Salt Intake Lowering Program: STOP-SÓ]

KISS István

[Cardiovascular disease accounts for more than 50% of Hungarian mortality and hypertension accounts for almost 50% of coronary heart disease and for more than 60% of stroke. High salt intake increases blood pressure and major and sustained consumption may cause high blood pressure. In Hungary more than 2.5 million people have hypertension and among them only 44% have their blood pressure under 140/90 mm Hg. Achieving target blood pressure is difficult as salt intake of the Hungarian population is higher than that recommended in every age group. Blood pressure control consists of proper combination of medical treatment and of nonmedical procedures. Among non-medical procedures weight loss, increase of physical activity, Mediterranean diet and decrease of salt intake are of value in blood pressure lowering. A daily salt intake of less than 6 grams is recommended in the Hungarian guideline and in the European one the recommendation is more rigorous. However in Hungary average salt intake is 18 grams among men and 14 grams among women. Responsibility of the individual person is inevitable in preserving health and preventing disease. A perfect example for this is the change of salt intake habits as it is demonstrated that decreasing salt intake results in the decrease of blood pressure. A daily decrease of 5 grams in salt intake results in 23% less stroke and 17% less cardiovascular disease. The Hungarian Society of Hypertension has joined among the first to the Hungarian Salt Intake Decreasing Programme and thus its activity is aimed at strengthening the public health subset of the Hungarian Cardiovascular Programme.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[New data about adolescent hypertension]

PÁLL Dénes, JUHÁSZ Mária, LENGYEL Szabolcs, FÜLESDI Béla, PARAGH György, KATONA Éva

[The new recommendation of management of high blood pressure in children and adolescents was published at Journal of Hypertension, September 2009. The aim of this review is - based on this guideline - to summarize the newest knowledge of epidemiology, pathomechanism, diagnosis and treatment of adolescent hypertension.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Pathophysiology, measurement methods and prognostic role of arterial stiffness]

TIMÁR Orsolya, SOLTÉSZ Pál

[In the past decade, a novel property of circulation, arterial stiffness (or decreased arterial distensibility) began to recieve special attention. Three years ago, Hypertonia and Nephrologia has already reviewed the gathered information on the clinical significance of arterial stiffness, described two commonly used stiffness parameters, pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx), and assessed the relationship of arterial stiffness and the traditional risk factors. Recently, more and more clinical epidemiological studies provided evidence that the parameters quantifying arterial stiffness are more than innocent side effects of cardiovascular changes, as they can be linked to target organ damage and increased mortality. In the present study, we review the pathomechanism and current methods of measurement of decreased arterial compliance, we summarize the results of recently closed epidemiologic studies and finally, we will briefly discuss possible measures of arterial stiffness treatment.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Advanced Parkinson’s disease characteristics in clinical practice: Results from the OBSERVE-PD study and sub-analysis of the Hungarian data]

TAKÁTS Annamária, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, VÉCSEI László, KLIVÉNYI Péter, DÉZSI Lívia, ZÁDORI Dénes, VALIKOVICS Attila, VARANNAI Lajos, ONUK Koray, KINCZEL Beatrix, KOVÁCS Norbert

[The majority of patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease are treated at specialized movement disorder centers. Currently, there is no clear consensus on how to define the stages of Parkinson’s disease; the proportion of Parkinson’s patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease, the referral process, and the clinical features used to characterize advanced Parkinson’s disease are not well delineated. The primary objective of this observational study was to evaluate the proportion of Parkinson’s patients identified as advanced patients according to physician’s judgment in all participating movement disorder centers across the study. Here we evaluate the Hungarian subset of the participating patients. The study was conducted in a cross-sectional, non-interventional, multi-country, multi-center format in 18 countries. Data were collected during a single patient visit. Current Parkinson’s disease status was assessed with Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) parts II, III, IV, and V (modified Hoehn and Yahr staging). Non-motor symptoms were assessed using the PD Non-motor Symptoms Scale (NMSS); quality of life was assessed with the PD 8-item Quality-of-Life Questionnaire (PDQ-8). Parkinson’s disease was classified as advanced versus non-advanced based on physician assessment and on questions developed by the Delphi method. Overall, 2627 patients with Parkinson’s disease from 126 sites were documented. In Hungary, 100 patients with Parkinson’s disease were documented in four movement disorder centers, and, according to the physician assessment, 50% of these patients had advanced Parkinson’s disease. Their mean scores showed significantly higher impairment in those with, versus without advanced Parkinson’s disease: UPDRS II (14.1 vs. 9.2), UPDRS IV Q32 (1.1 vs. 0.0) and Q39 (1.1 vs. 0.5), UPDRS V (2.8 vs. 2.0) and PDQ-8 (29.1 vs. 18.9). Physicians in Hungarian movement disorder centers assessed that half of the Parkinson’s patients had advanced disease, with worse motor and non-motor symptom severity and worse QoL than those without advanced Parkinson’s disease. Despite being classified as eligible for invasive/device-aided treatment, that treatment had not been initiated in 25% of these patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Evaluation of anxiety, depression and marital relationships in patients with migraine

DEMIR Fıgen Ulku, BOZKURT Oya

Aim - The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and characteristics of attacks in patients with migraine, to determine the effects of anxiety or depressive symptoms, and to evaluate the marital relationships of patients with migraine. Method - Thirty patients who were admitted to the neurology outpatient clinic of our hospital between July 2018 and October 2018 and were diagnosed with migraine according to the 2013 International Headache Society (IHS) diagnostic criteria were included in this cross-sectional study. Age, sex, headache frequency and severity, depressive traits, marital satisfaction and anxiety status were examined. We used the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Maudsley Marital Questionnaire (MMQ) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for measuring relevant parameters. Results - The mean severity of migraine pain according to VAS scale was 6.93 ± 1.41 and the mean number of migraine attacks was 4.50 ± 4.24. The mean BDI score of the patients was 12.66 ± 8.98, the mean MMQ-M score was 19.80 ± 12.52, the mean MMQ-S score was 13.20 ± 9.53, the mean STAI-state score was 39.93 ± 10.87 and the mean STAI-trait score was 45.73 ± 8.96. No significant correlation was found between age, number of migraine attacks, migraine duration, migraine headache intensity, and BDI, STAI and MMQ scores (p>0.05). But there was a positive correlation between MMQ-S and scores obtained from the BDI and STAI-state scales (p<0.05). Conclusion - In this study more than half of the migraine patients had mild, moderate or severe depression. A positive correlation was found between sexual dissatisfaction and scale scores of depression and anxiety.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Decisional collisions between evidence and experience based medicine in care of people with epilepsy]

RAJNA Péter

[Background – Based on the literature and his long-term clinical practice the author stresses the main collisions of evidence and experience based medicine in the care of people with epilepsy. Purpose – To see, what are the professional decisions of high responsibility in the epilepsy-care, in whose the relevant clinical research is still lacking or does not give a satisfactory basis. Methods – Following the structure of the Hungarian Guideline the author points the critical situations and decisions. He explains also the causes of the dilemmas: the lack or uncertainty of evidences or the difficulty of scientific investigation of the situation. Results – There are some priorities of experience based medicine in the following areas: definition of epilepsy, classification of seizures, etiology – including genetic background –, role of precipitating and provoking factors. These are able to influence the complex diagnosis. In the pharmacotherapy the choice of the first drug and the optimal algorithm as well as the tasks during the care are also depends on personal experiences sometimes contradictory to the official recommendations. Same can occur in the choice of the non-pharmacological treatments and rehabilitation. Discussion and conclusion – Personal professional experiences (and interests of patients) must be obligatory accessories of evidence based attitude, but for achieving the optimal results, in some situations they replace the official recommendations. Therefore it is very important that the problematic patients do meet experts having necessary experiences and also professional responsibility to help in these decisions. ]

Hungarian Radiology

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HARKÁNYI Zoltán, MORVAY Zita

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[Congress Report of the 27th Congress of the Hungarian Society of Hypertension ]

CSEPREKÁL Orsolya