Hypertension and nephrology

[Hypertension and sexuality]

BARNA István

FEBRUARY 20, 2010

Hypertension and nephrology - 2010;14(01)

[Atherosclerosis is a phenomenon of natural aging and as part of it erectile dysfunction (ED) occurs. ED is further aggraveted by smoking, diabetes, atherogen dyslipidemia, obesity, systolic hypertension and vascular disesases (carotid, coronary and peripheral). The average incidence of ED is 19.2% but depending on age (between 30 and 80 years) the relative frequency is fairly different (from 2.3% to 53.5%). Appearence of ED might be the first warning sign of cardiovascular disease. The basis of the treatment of hypertensive males suffering from ED might be the cessation of smoking and quitting alcohol consumption. Optimalization of body weight includes low dietary fat and carbohydrate consumption. Concerning the antihypertensive treatment of males suffering from ED centrally acting agents, diuretics (except indapamide) and beta blockers (except carvedilol and nebivolol) should be omitted. Because of the neutral effect of calcium channel blockers and ACE inhibitors they can be safely administered. There is increasing evidence about ARBs that they have beneficial effect on erectile function and libido, too. If, testosterone production decreases hormone substitution - controlled by an urologist - can be recommended. Oral phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDE5) can be safely administered even in hypertension. The incidence of sexual dysfunction (SD) among women between ages 40 and 80 is 47%. The most frequent cause in the background of decreased sexual desire among women are psychological, emotional and hormonal reasons or side effect of medication. Several studies proved the association of hypertension, high plasma cholesterol levels, smoking, vascular diseases and sexual dysfunction among women. Disturbance of local blood supply (clitoral, vaginal) is an early prognostic sign, too, like in males. Estrogen hormon replacement might alleviate these symptoms. In recent years sildenafil proved to be effective in several studies and ARBs improve libido, as well.]

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Hypertension and nephrology

[Letter to the Reader A Letter to Society Members]

KISS István, TÚRI Sándor,

Hypertension and nephrology

[Enjoyable and invisible risk: salt The role of the Hungarian Hypertension Society in the National Salt Intake Lowering Program: STOP-SÓ]

KISS István

[Cardiovascular disease accounts for more than 50% of Hungarian mortality and hypertension accounts for almost 50% of coronary heart disease and for more than 60% of stroke. High salt intake increases blood pressure and major and sustained consumption may cause high blood pressure. In Hungary more than 2.5 million people have hypertension and among them only 44% have their blood pressure under 140/90 mm Hg. Achieving target blood pressure is difficult as salt intake of the Hungarian population is higher than that recommended in every age group. Blood pressure control consists of proper combination of medical treatment and of nonmedical procedures. Among non-medical procedures weight loss, increase of physical activity, Mediterranean diet and decrease of salt intake are of value in blood pressure lowering. A daily salt intake of less than 6 grams is recommended in the Hungarian guideline and in the European one the recommendation is more rigorous. However in Hungary average salt intake is 18 grams among men and 14 grams among women. Responsibility of the individual person is inevitable in preserving health and preventing disease. A perfect example for this is the change of salt intake habits as it is demonstrated that decreasing salt intake results in the decrease of blood pressure. A daily decrease of 5 grams in salt intake results in 23% less stroke and 17% less cardiovascular disease. The Hungarian Society of Hypertension has joined among the first to the Hungarian Salt Intake Decreasing Programme and thus its activity is aimed at strengthening the public health subset of the Hungarian Cardiovascular Programme.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[New data about adolescent hypertension]

PÁLL Dénes, JUHÁSZ Mária, LENGYEL Szabolcs, FÜLESDI Béla, PARAGH György, KATONA Éva

[The new recommendation of management of high blood pressure in children and adolescents was published at Journal of Hypertension, September 2009. The aim of this review is - based on this guideline - to summarize the newest knowledge of epidemiology, pathomechanism, diagnosis and treatment of adolescent hypertension.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Symptomes and genetics of nephronophthisis]

TORY Kálmán, VÁRKONYI Ildikó, BERNÁTH Mária, RÉMI Salomon, SOPHIE Saunier, MARIE-CLAIRE Gubler, CORINNE Antignac, TULASSAY Tivadar, REUSZ György

[Nephronophthisis is an autosomal recessive, chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy, responsible for 6-10% of childhood chronic renal failure cases. Its first symptoms, polyuria-polydipsia, anaemia and failure to thrive precede the development of end-stage renal disease by years. Increased echogenicity with loss of corticomedullary differentiation are the key findings on ultrasound, the lack of cysts does not rule out the diagnosis. Histologically, it is characterized by interstitial fibrosis and irregularities of the tubular basal membrane. Genetically, it is highly heterogeneous. Ten nephronophthisis genes have already been identified in 60% of the patients. The encoded proteins - similarly to other proteins mutated in cystic kidney diseases - are localized to primary cilium-basal body-centrosomal complex.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Pathophysiology, measurement methods and prognostic role of arterial stiffness]

TIMÁR Orsolya, SOLTÉSZ Pál

[In the past decade, a novel property of circulation, arterial stiffness (or decreased arterial distensibility) began to recieve special attention. Three years ago, Hypertonia and Nephrologia has already reviewed the gathered information on the clinical significance of arterial stiffness, described two commonly used stiffness parameters, pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx), and assessed the relationship of arterial stiffness and the traditional risk factors. Recently, more and more clinical epidemiological studies provided evidence that the parameters quantifying arterial stiffness are more than innocent side effects of cardiovascular changes, as they can be linked to target organ damage and increased mortality. In the present study, we review the pathomechanism and current methods of measurement of decreased arterial compliance, we summarize the results of recently closed epidemiologic studies and finally, we will briefly discuss possible measures of arterial stiffness treatment.]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Hypertension and nephrology

[Association between cyclothymic affective temperament and hypertension]

NEMCSIK János, BATTA Dóra, KŐRÖSI Beáta, RIHMER Zoltán

[Affective temperaments (cyclothymic, hypertymic, depressive, anxious, irritable) are stable parts of personality and after adolescent only their minor changes are detectable. Their connections with psychopathology is well-described; depressive temperament plays role in major depression, cyclothymic temperament in bipolar II disorder, while hyperthymic temperament in bipolar I disorder. Moreover, scientific data of the last decade suggest, that affective temperaments are also associated with somatic diseases. Cyclothymic temperament is supposed to have the closest connection with hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension is higher parallel with the presence of dominant cyclothymic affective temperament and in this condition the frequency of cardiovascular complications in hypertensive patients was also described to be higher. In chronic hypertensive patients cyclothymic temperament score is positively associated with systolic blood pressure and in women with the earlier development of hypertension. The background of these associations is probably based on the more prevalent presence of common risk factors (smoking, obesity, alcoholism) with more pronounced cyclothymic temperament. The scientific importance of the research of the associations of personality traits including affective temperaments with somatic disorders can help in the identification of higher risk patient subgroups.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[The importance of assessing subclinical organ damage in risk prediction of hypertensive patients]

GODINA Gabriella, JÁRAI Zoltán

[As the cardiovascular risk influences the quality and intensity of blood pressure lowering therapy, the goal blood pressure values and the frequency of medical control of hypertensive patients, as well as global risk assessment has an important role in the management of hypertension. In the last couple of years many data have been accumulated showing the poor prognostic value of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. This is the reason why recent Hungarian and international guidelines on the management of hypertension advise the screening for subclinical organ damage. Our goal was to summarize the importance of subclinical organ damage by discussing recently published literature on this topic. An overview has been made on the markers of vascular subclinical damage, like carotid atherosclerosis proved with carotid ultrasonography, peripheral arterial disease assessed with ankle-brachial pressure index measurements and vascular rigidity defined with pulse wave velocity measurements. The prognostic values of myocardial hypertrophy assessed with ECG and/or echocardiography and renal damage proved with decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria are also discussed. Summing up what has been said so far, the assessment of subclinical organ damage has a role in cardiovascular risk prediction, however more randomized and prospective studies have to be performed to define the most suitable (i.e. the most reliable and the most cost-effective) markers for this purpose.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Update on diagnostics and therapy of the renal artery stenosis in 2010]

KOLOSSVÁRY Endre, FARKAS Katalin, KERKOVITS Lóránt, KISS István

[Results of epidemiological studies indicate the atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis is a common condition, thus development of its diagnostics and therapy has significant importance. Renal artery narrowing can cause hypertension, renal function decline, cardiac failure and the increased cardiovascular risk seriously affects survival perspective of the patients. The evolution of MR technology has a prominent role in renovascular diagnostics. Beyond the detection of arterial stenosis this technique is capable of the functional characterization of the stenosis and the detailed description of the regional kidney tissue damage. Based on the results of clinical studies the relevance of revascularization of the renal artery stenosis remains uncertain. The trials focusing on this issue show methodological imperfections. It remains to be elucidated whether these methodological problems will be tackled in the future based on the present information. This review focuses on the actual findings corresponding to these problems.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Cholesterol-lowering is not the Holy Grail, but neither is the work of the devil]

BAJNOK László

[Cholesterol-lowering statins are the most tested medications in respect of the effects and side-effects. Based on these, we can safely claim that most of the negative opinions about cholesterol-lowering are not realistic. It is not a panacea, but it is proven that around a 30% of cardio- and cerebrovascular risk reducation can be achieved by their regular taking, while the incidence of side effects and risks are at least one order of magnitude lower in each patient groups. For cholesterol, there is no “normal” lab threshold or low level, only “target values”, since the mean value in the general population is high in regard of atherosclerosis (the values measured at birth and among natural people can be considered normal). Let us appreciate the cholesterol- lowering medications because we do not have a large armamentarium!]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Statin therapy and hyperuricemia in hyperlipidemia - the clinical importance of atorvastatin]

CSIKY Botond

[Population based studies have proven that serum level of uric acid is a cardiovascular risk factor. Uric acid is produced in the human body as a result of the degradation of endogenous and exogenous purin nucleotids. It is eliminated mainly by the kidneys and in a small amount through the gastrointestinal tract. Serum uric acid can be decreased by some medical therapies. It has been demonstrated that atorvastatin treatment can decrease significantly uric acid level in patients with hyperlipidemia. Other statins do not seem to have such an effect. The uric acid lowering effect of atorvastatin is dose-dependent, and it most likely acts by increasing the renal elimination. The cholesterol, trgiglycerid and uric acid lowering effect of atorvastatin may have an important role in decreasing cardiovascular risk.]