Hypertension and nephrology

[ESH Advanced Course on Hypertension – St. Moritz, 3-10 March 2013]

MARCH 22, 2013

Hypertension and nephrology - 2013;17(01)

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Hypertension and nephrology

[Report on the 10th Regional Hypertension Day]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Obstructive sleep apnea, hypertension and cardiovascular risk]

ALFÖLDI Sándor

[Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a surprisingly frequent disease worsening the quality of life of the patients, associated with serious complications, however, largely underdiagnosed and undertreated. OSA, hypertension and other symptoms of the metabolic syndrome are closely and independently correlated. OSA has been substantially emphasized as a new (emerging) cardiometabolic risk factor, not only a risk marker. The severe form of OSA (apnea-hypnea index>20/hour) has been accepted as a component of high cardiovascular risk on the Hungarian Cardiovascular Consensus Conference in 2008. Greater attention both to the identification and to the treatment of blood pressure increase associated with OSA as well as to the detection of OSA in patients with the diagnosis of hypertension has been suggested by the new European OSA and Hypertension Position Papers, because hypertension associated with OSA is frequently resistant and the proper management of OSA and hypertension could decrease the cardiovascular risk in patients followed up either in sleep or in hypertension centres.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[The success of fixed combined amlodipine/atorvastatin (Amlator®) therapy in patients with hypertension and dyslipidemia]

KÉKES Ede

[In total 2606 patients with hypertension and dyslipidemia got combined antihypertensive and antilipid-treatment. The main component of therapy was amlodipine/ atorvastatin fixed combination in different dose variations. The goal of the study was to access optimal target blood pressure and lipid profile. The baseline average blood pressure value was 155.9/90.18 mmHg and it decreased to 132.77/80.04 mmHg during the six months therapy. The lipid profile also changed successfully: the average value of total cholesterol decreased from 5.97 mmol/l to 4.68 mmol/l, LDL cholesteron from 3.45 mmol/l to 2.49 mmol/l and serum triglyceride from 2.1 mmol/l to 1.69 mmol/l. We reached the target values in respect of LDL cholesterol (<2.5 mmol/l) and of triglyceride (<1.7 mmol/l) prescribed in guidelines for subjects with high cardiovascular risk. According to the global cardiovascular risk estimation (European Heart Score) the risk ratio in percent was significantly decreased in each age group, in both genders and in smoking or nonsmoking subjects.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[The beginning and difficulties of peritoneal dialysis at the end of the last century - Part I. International experiences]

KARÁTSON András

[The theoretical background of peritoneal dialysis dates back to the 18th and 19th century. It was in 1923 when the first experimental and clinical experiences were summarised by Ganter from Munich. Of the Hungarian researchers Stephen Rosenak’s name can be mentioned, who was working in this field in Bonn in 1926 and later in London and New York. Obstacles to the spread of this treatment method was the lack of appropriate abdominal catheters, biocompatible solutions and equipment. The intermittent technique of the method was time consuming and, due to the conditions of that time, peritonitis frequently developed. The spread of the method was facilitated by the catheter constructed by Tenchkoff towards the end of the 1960s, the automatization of the treatment and later continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) described by Popovich and Moncrief. Further development of the method became possible by the use of the two-litre plastic bags instead of the bottled solution and later a twin-bag system employing the “flush before fill” technique. The occurrence of peritonitis developing during the treatment gradually decreased, in which Stephen I. Vas of Hungarian origin, working in Toronto as a professor of microbiology played an important role by constantly improving and modifying the principles of the therapy. Besides the infection in the abdominal cavity the bioincompatibility of the dialysis fluid presented another problem, which was solved by the use of essential amino acids, icodextrin instead of glucose and bicarbonate instead of lactate. By the turn of the century it became clear that the survival rate of peritoneal dialysis is very similar to that of hemodialysis in the second and third years following the treatment, while in relation to the quality of life it proved to be better. This observation has been proved in numerous clinical studies in the past decade and has been refined with regard to patients’ age, their primary and accompanying diseases. It is my intention to give account of the Hungarian experiences with peritoneal dialysis in the second part.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Scientific Programs of the Hungarian Society of Hypertension Characteristics of Hungarian Hypertensive Patients According to the Hungarian Society of Hypertension Registry and the Program “Live Below 140/90” ]

KÉKES Ede, KERKOVITS Lóránt, BÖDÖR Anikó, KISS István

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Late simultaneous carcinomatous meningitis, temporal bone infiltrating macro-metastasis and disseminated multi-organ micro-metastases presenting with mono-symptomatic vertigo – a clinico-pathological case reporT

JARABIN András János, KLIVÉNYI Péter, TISZLAVICZ László, MOLNÁR Anna Fiona, GION Katalin, FÖLDESI Imre, KISS Geza Jozsef, ROVÓ László, BELLA Zsolt

Although vertigo is one of the most common complaints, intracranial malignant tumors rarely cause sudden asymmetry between the tone of the vestibular peripheries masquerading as a peripheral-like disorder. Here we report a case of simultaneous temporal bone infiltrating macro-metastasis and disseminated multi-organ micro-metastases presenting as acute unilateral vestibular syndrome, due to the reawakening of a primary gastric signet ring cell carcinoma. Purpose – Our objective was to identify those pathophysiological steps that may explain the complex process of tumor reawakening, dissemination. The possible causes of vestibular asymmetry were also traced. A 56-year-old male patient’s interdisciplinary medical data had been retrospectively analyzed. Original clinical and pathological results have been collected and thoroughly reevaluated, then new histological staining and immunohistochemistry methods have been added to the diagnostic pool. During the autopsy the cerebrum and cerebellum was edematous. The apex of the left petrous bone was infiltrated and destructed by a tumor mass of 2x2 cm in size. Histological reexamination of the original gastric resection specimen slides revealed focal submucosal tumorous infiltration with a vascular invasion. By immunohistochemistry mainly single infiltrating tumor cells were observed with Cytokeratin 7 and Vimentin positivity and partial loss of E-cadherin staining. The subsequent histological examination of necropsy tissue specimens confirmed the disseminated, multi-organ microscopic tumorous invasion. Discussion – It has been recently reported that the expression of Vimentin and the loss of E-cadherin is significantly associated with advanced stage, lymph node metastasis, vascular and neural invasion and undifferentiated type with p<0.05 significance. As our patient was middle aged and had no immune-deficiency, the promoting factor of the reawakening of the primary GC malignant disease after a 9-year-long period of dormancy remained undiscovered. The organ-specific tropism explained by the “seed and soil” theory was unexpected, due to rare occurrence of gastric cancer to metastasize in the meninges given that only a minority of these cells would be capable of crossing the blood brain barrier. Patients with past malignancies and new onset of neurological symptoms should alert the physician to central nervous system involvement, and the appropriate, targeted diagnostic and therapeutic work-up should be established immediately. Targeted staining with specific antibodies is recommended. Recent studies on cell lines indicate that metformin strongly inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition of gastric cancer cells. Therefore, further studies need to be performed on cases positive for epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

Clinical Neuroscience

Simultaneous subdural, subarachnoideal and intracerebral haemorrhage after rupture of a peripheral middle cerebral artery aneurysm

BÉRES-MOLNÁR Anna Katalin, FOLYOVICH András, SZLOBODA Péter, SZENDREY-KISS Zsolt, BERECZKI Dániel, BAKOS Mária, VÁRALLYAY György, SZABÓ Huba, NYÁRI István

The cause of intracerebral, subarachnoid and subdural haemorrhage is different, and the simultaneous appearance in the same case is extremely rare. We describe the case of a patient with a ruptured aneurysm on the distal segment of the middle cerebral artery, with a concomitant subdural and intracerebral haemorrhage, and a subsequent secondary brainstem (Duret) haemorrhage. The 59-year-old woman had hypertension and diabetes in her medical history. She experienced anomic aphasia and left-sided headache starting one day before admission. She had no trauma. A few minutes after admission she suddenly became comatose, her breathing became superficial. Non-contrast CT revealed left sided fronto-parietal subdural and subarachnoid and intracerebral haemorrhage, and bleeding was also observed in the right pontine region. The patient had leucocytosis and hyperglycemia but normal hemostasis. After the subdural haemorrhage had been evacuated, the patient was transferred to intensive care unit. Sepsis developed. Echocardiography did not detect endocarditis. Neurological status, vigilance gradually improved. The rehabilitation process was interrupted by epileptic status. Control CT and CT angiography proved an aneurysm in the peripheral part of the left middle cerebral artery, which was later clipped. Histolo­gical examination excluded mycotic etiology of the aneu­rysm and “normal aneurysm wall” was described. The brain stem haemorrhage – Duret bleeding – was presumably caused by a sudden increase in intracranial pressure due to the supratentorial space occupying process and consequential trans-tentorial herniation. This case is a rarity, as the patient not only survived, but lives an active life with some residual symptoms.

Hypertension and nephrology

[Association between cyclothymic affective temperament and hypertension]

NEMCSIK János, BATTA Dóra, KŐRÖSI Beáta, RIHMER Zoltán

[Affective temperaments (cyclothymic, hypertymic, depressive, anxious, irritable) are stable parts of personality and after adolescent only their minor changes are detectable. Their connections with psychopathology is well-described; depressive temperament plays role in major depression, cyclothymic temperament in bipolar II disorder, while hyperthymic temperament in bipolar I disorder. Moreover, scientific data of the last decade suggest, that affective temperaments are also associated with somatic diseases. Cyclothymic temperament is supposed to have the closest connection with hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension is higher parallel with the presence of dominant cyclothymic affective temperament and in this condition the frequency of cardiovascular complications in hypertensive patients was also described to be higher. In chronic hypertensive patients cyclothymic temperament score is positively associated with systolic blood pressure and in women with the earlier development of hypertension. The background of these associations is probably based on the more prevalent presence of common risk factors (smoking, obesity, alcoholism) with more pronounced cyclothymic temperament. The scientific importance of the research of the associations of personality traits including affective temperaments with somatic disorders can help in the identification of higher risk patient subgroups.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Advanced Parkinson’s disease characteristics in clinical practice: Results from the OBSERVE-PD study and sub-analysis of the Hungarian data]

TAKÁTS Annamária, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, VÉCSEI László, KLIVÉNYI Péter, DÉZSI Lívia, ZÁDORI Dénes, VALIKOVICS Attila, VARANNAI Lajos, ONUK Koray, KINCZEL Beatrix, KOVÁCS Norbert

[The majority of patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease are treated at specialized movement disorder centers. Currently, there is no clear consensus on how to define the stages of Parkinson’s disease; the proportion of Parkinson’s patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease, the referral process, and the clinical features used to characterize advanced Parkinson’s disease are not well delineated. The primary objective of this observational study was to evaluate the proportion of Parkinson’s patients identified as advanced patients according to physician’s judgment in all participating movement disorder centers across the study. Here we evaluate the Hungarian subset of the participating patients. The study was conducted in a cross-sectional, non-interventional, multi-country, multi-center format in 18 countries. Data were collected during a single patient visit. Current Parkinson’s disease status was assessed with Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) parts II, III, IV, and V (modified Hoehn and Yahr staging). Non-motor symptoms were assessed using the PD Non-motor Symptoms Scale (NMSS); quality of life was assessed with the PD 8-item Quality-of-Life Questionnaire (PDQ-8). Parkinson’s disease was classified as advanced versus non-advanced based on physician assessment and on questions developed by the Delphi method. Overall, 2627 patients with Parkinson’s disease from 126 sites were documented. In Hungary, 100 patients with Parkinson’s disease were documented in four movement disorder centers, and, according to the physician assessment, 50% of these patients had advanced Parkinson’s disease. Their mean scores showed significantly higher impairment in those with, versus without advanced Parkinson’s disease: UPDRS II (14.1 vs. 9.2), UPDRS IV Q32 (1.1 vs. 0.0) and Q39 (1.1 vs. 0.5), UPDRS V (2.8 vs. 2.0) and PDQ-8 (29.1 vs. 18.9). Physicians in Hungarian movement disorder centers assessed that half of the Parkinson’s patients had advanced disease, with worse motor and non-motor symptom severity and worse QoL than those without advanced Parkinson’s disease. Despite being classified as eligible for invasive/device-aided treatment, that treatment had not been initiated in 25% of these patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

CANOMAD syndrome with respiratory failure

SALAMON András, DÉZSI Lívia, RADICS Bence, VARGA Tímea Edina, HORTOBÁGYI Tibor, TÖMÖSVÁRI Adrienn, VÉCSEI László, KLIVÉNYI Péter, RAJDA Cecília

CANOMAD (chronic ataxic neuropathy, ophthalmoplegia, M-protein agglutination, disialosyl antibodies) syndrome is a rare polyneuropathy. IgM paraproteins react with ganglioside-containing disialylated epitopes resulting in dorsal root ganglionopathy and B-lymphocyte infiltration of cranial and peripheral nerves. Clinical features include ataxia, slight muscle weakness, areflexia, sensory- and cranial nerve symptoms. Case studies have reported the efficacy of rituximab and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) treatments. We present the case of a 57-year-old man, who had difficulty walking, with numbness and clumsiness in all limbs. He had areflexia, vibratory sensation loss and ataxia. Laboratory tests showed IgM monoclonal components and disialosyl antibodies in the serum. Nerve conduction studies indicated severe sensorimotor demyelinating polyneuroradiculopathy. Despite IVIg and rituximab treatments, the patient’s disease course gradually worsened and he died of respiratory failure. Neuropathological examination revealed dorsal column- and dorsal root atrophy with mixed mononuclear cell infiltration. This article aims to draw attention to this syndrome, and the use of early potent immunosuppressive treatment to improve patients’ quality of life.