Hypertension and nephrology

[Dialysis treatment in Hungary: 2010–2015]

KULCSÁR Imre1,2, ILLÉS Melinda1, KOVÁCS LÁSZLÓ1,2

OCTOBER 20, 2016

Hypertension and nephrology - 2016;20(05)

[The authors show the data of Hungarian dialysis statistics from 2010 to 2015. The questionnaire - based data collection was made by Dialysis Registry Committee of the Hungarian Society of Nephrology. The number of all patients entered in the dialysis program increased by 8.4% over six years (an average of 1.4/ per year) and the number of new ones increased by 10.5% (1.75% per year). Between 2003 and 2009 the mean annual increasing of new patients was 7.5%! The incidence of new dialyzed patients was 440/1 million population in 2010 and 486/1 million) in 2015. The population point prevalence at the end of the year was 621/1 million in 2010 and 643/1 million in 2015. The penetrance of peritoneal dialysis was 13.5% in 2010, and 13.6% in 2015. The proportion of incident patients with diabetic or hypertensive nephropathies (conditions which lead to end stage renal disease) was about the same in 2010 (27 and 21%) than in 2016 (27 and 22%). The mean age of incident patients entered into dialysis program decreased from 66.9 years (2010) to 62.8 years (2015), surprisingly. The rate of patients on waiting list for renal transplantation was 10.7% in 2009 and increased to 15,8% in 2015. There is also a significant increase in the number of the annual renal transplantations (268 in 2010 and 356 in 2015). The mortality rate of chronically dialyzed patients shows little decrease (14.4-13.1%).]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. B. Braun Avitum Hungary Zrt. 6. sz. Dialízisközpont, Szombathely
  2. Markusovszky Egyetemi Oktatókórház, Nephrologia Részleg, Szombathely

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