Hypertension and nephrology

[Comparison of kidney transplant patients with IR-tacrolimus and LCP-tacrolimus]

BORDA Bernadett1

JUNE 24, 2020

Hypertension and nephrology - 2020;24(3)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.33668/hn.24.009

[Tremor is the most common adverse event of tacrolimus, and it correlates with the peak concentration of the drug. LCP-tacrolimus is a prolonged release formulation of tacrolimus to be administered once daily and has a dec - reased Cmax value. Hand tremors are evaluated by the Fahn-Tolosa-Marin (FTM) scale used by the neurologists. In case of hand tremor, tacrolimus is switched to LCP-tacrolimus. Tremor improved significantly in accordance with the STRATO cli - ni cal study, which confirmed that switching to LCP-tacrolimus resulted in clinically significant improvement in hand tremor.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Szegedi Tudományegyetem, Sebészeti Klinika, Szeged

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[The prevalence of chronic renal failure and hypertension is steadily increasing worldwide. The risk of possible cardiovascular death in patient with advanced renal failure is greater than the risk of progression to end-stage renal failure. Therefore treating and achieving target blood pressure is important in order to slow renal function decline in parallel with cardiovascular risk reduction. However, guidelines do not specify a single blood pressure target to be achieved in patients with renal failure, but suggest evidence based, reno- and cardioprotective therapy. This paper summarizes the clinical practice of treating hypertension (drug and nondrug treatment, therapeutic algorithm, target value, effectiveness of therapy) in patients with chronic renal failure.]

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[The appearance of the Covid-19 epidemic in different continents shows specific clinical features. Confirmed infected patients are detectable from approximately 30 years, with a maximum between 40 and 70 years of age. At the same time, however, a significant proportion of those who die from the infection come from patients over 65 years. The prevalence and mortality rates of the hypertensive population show a very similar formation. Based on the data collected, it is not surprising that hypertension as the underlying disease in the Covid- 19 epidemic is the first in all analysis. A more precise analysis clarified that it is not hypertension per se, but co-morbidities and complications of hypertension that play a primary role behind large-scale mortality in old age, such as diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. Data from China, North America, and Italy suggest that hypertension and diabetes – and in North America, pathological obesity – in infected patients actually only reflect the prevalence of these diseases in a given population. The presence of comorbidities (coronary artery disease, stroke, heart failure, arrhythmia, chronic kidney disease) – based on multivariate logistic regression analysis – presents a more risk for severe clinical course and mortality. Some recent analyses have provided strong evidence that ACEI/ARB treatment does not pose a higher risk for the course or outcome of infection. Their administration is constantly needed in hypertension and comorbidities due to their organ protective and slowing the progression of diseases.]

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