Hypertension and nephrology

[Article Reports]

VÁLYI Péter

SEPTEMBER 12, 2018

Hypertension and nephrology - 2018;22(04)

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Hypertension and nephrology

[Letter to our Readers]

KÉKES Ede

Hypertension and nephrology

[Treatment of hypertension in kidney transplant patients]

KOVÁCS Tibor, WAGNER László

[Most of the renal transplant recipients suffer from hypertension. Hypertension substantially contributes to the high cardiovascular mortality in this population. The recommendation of the Hungarian Society of Hypertension and the international guidelines suggest to achieve less than 130/80 mmHg as target blood pressure in these patients. Several factors may be in the background of hypertension after kidney transplantation, which can be summarized as factors from the recipient-side, the donorside and factors provoked by transplantation itself. In most of the cases early after transplantation high doses of immunosuppressive drugs (especially calcineurin inhibitors and steroids) are responsible for the increased blood pressure. There are some further special methods apart from the general recommendations which are needed during the examination of hypertension of kidney transplant patients: e.g. measurement of blood trough-level of immunosuppressive drugs, investigation of bone-mineral disorder, screening for the level and causes of anaemia, check-up of the renal graft circulation. Kidney transplant patients suffering from hypertension usually need more than two antihypertensive drugs beyond the use of non-pharmaceutical antihypertensive methods. In the early posttransplantation period calcium channel blockers are preferred antihypertensive medications, because they counterbalance the vasoconstrictive effect of calcineurin inhibitors. The administration of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone inhibitors are rather suggested after the stabilization of renal function (from the 1-3 months posttransplantation). When designing antihypertensive strategy, comorbidities and special factors should be regarded as well, especially volume overload, proteinuria, allograft function (GFR), diabetes, other cardiovascular risk factors, previous cardiovascular events. The setup of an individual therapeutical strategy is advised in view of all these factors, which is different according to the timing after transplantation: the perioperative, the early postoperative phases and from 1-3 months after transplantation have special focuses.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Hungary’s anthropometric position based on national public health screening (2010-2017). Data and correlation analysis - Part I.]

KÉKES Ede, BARNA István, DAIKI Tenno, Dankovics Gergely, †KISS István

[The aim of the study is to present a Hungarian anthropometric profile on a full-scale basis (body mass, BMI, waist circumference, waist/hip ratio, percentage of body fat, abdominal fat mass) based on the data of the “Nationwide Comprehensive Health Screening Program in Hungary 2010-2020” collected over 8 years. In the analysis we processed 70,094 women and 67,549 men. We found, that in the Hungarian society, overweight and obesity was on the rise between 2010 and 2017, and beyond 2014 its rate was ever higher. Growth of body fat and abdominal fat is characteristic for both sexes, but abdominal obesity in relative terms of waist size, waist/hip ratio and percentage of body fat is significantly higher in morbid obese women. The fact is particularly worrying that these growth trends are already present in age groups of 18-26. These signs warn us definitely that we need to take a greater part in influencing the lifestyle, eating habits of individuals and in the promotion of physical activity.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Treatment of Hypertension in Elder and Old Age]

DOLGOS Szilveszter

Hypertension and nephrology

[Physical training in dialysis population]

SCHNEIDER Károly

[The impaired physical activity and the related increased cardiovascular risk is caracteristic in all stages of chronic kidney diseases. The regular physical activity has a beneficial effect on the metabolic risks associated with chronic kidney disease, dialysis and poor activity lifestyle, it also has favorable effect on the inflammatory state, poor physical performance, muscle loss and can improve the quality of life and life expectancy. Accordingly, the international and Hungarian guidelines suggest at least 150 minutes physical activity with moderate intensity per week - at least five days, 30 minutes each day. But there are no particular guidelines for dialysated patients. This article, without being exhaustive, in part using our own experiences, present suggestions for the physical activity of dialysated patients.]

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Life threatening rare lymphomas presenting as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis: a diagnostic challenge

TOLVAJ Balázs, HAHN Katalin, NAGY Zsuzsanna, VADVÁRI Árpád, CSOMOR Judit, GELPI Ellen, ILLÉS Zsolt, GARZULY Ferenc

Background and aims – Description of two cases of rare intravascular large B-cell lymphoma and secondary T-cell lymphoma diagnosed postmortem, that manifested clinically as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM). We discuss causes of diagnostic difficulties, deceptive radiological and histological investigations, and outline diagnostic procedures based on our and previously reported cases. Case reports – Our first case, a 48-year-old female was admitted to the neurological department due to paraparesis. MRI suggested LETM, but the treatments were ineffective. She died after four weeks because of pneumonia and untreatable polyserositis. Pathological examination revealed intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVL). Our second case, a 61-year-old man presented with headache and paraparesis. MRI showed small bitemporal lesions and lesions suggesting LETM. Diagnostic investigations were unsuccessful, including tests for possible lymphoma (CSF flow cytometry and muscle biopsy for suspected IVL). Chest CT showed focal inflammation in a small area of the lung, and adrenal adenoma. Brain biopsy sample from the affected temporal area suggested T-cell mediated lymphocytic (paraneoplastic or viral) meningoencephalitis and excluded diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The symptoms worsened, and the patient died in the sixth week of disease. The pathological examination of the presumed adenoma in the adrenal gland, the pancreatic tail and the lung lesions revealed peripheral T-cell lymphoma, as did the brain and spinal cord lesions. Even at histological examination, the T-cell lymphoma had the misleading appearance of inflammatory condition as did the MRI. Conclusion – Lymphoma can manifest as LETM. In cases of etiologically unclear atypical LETM in patients older than 40 years, a random skin biopsy (with subcutaneous adipose tissue) from the thigh and from the abdomen is strongly recommended as soon as possible. This may detect IVL and provide the possibility of prompt chemotherapy. In case of suspicion of lymphoma, parallel examination of the CSF by flow cytometry is also recommended. If skin biopsy is negative but lymphoma suspicion remains high, biopsy from other sites (bone marrow, lymph nodes or adrenal gland lesion) or from a simultaneously existing cerebral lesion is suggested, to exclude or prove diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, IVL, or a rare T-cell lymphoma.

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[Family planning in multiple sclerosis: conception, pregnancy, breastfeeding]

RÓZSA Csilla

[Family planning is an exceptionally important question in multiple sclerosis, as women of childbearing age are the ones most often affected. Although it is proven that pregnancy does not worsen the long-term prognosis of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, many patients are still doubtful about having children. This question is further complicated by the fact that patients – and often even doctors – are not sufficiently informed about how the ever-increasing number of available disease-modifying treatments affect pregnancies. Breastfeeding is an even less clear topic. Patients usually look to their neurologists first for answers concerning these matters. It falls to the neurologist to rationally evaluate the risks and benefits of contraception, pregnancy, assisted reproduction, childbirth, breastfeeding and disease modifying treatments, to inform patients about these, and then together come to a decision about the best possible therapeutic approach, taking the patients’ individual family plans into consideration. Here we present a review of relevant literature adhering to international guidelines on the topics of conception, pregnancy and breastfeeding, with a special focus on the applicability of approved disease modifying treatments during pregnancy and breastfeeding. The goal of this article is to provide clinicians involved in the care of MS patients with up-to-date information that they can utilize in their day-to-day clinical practice. ]

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CANOMAD syndrome with respiratory failure

SALAMON András, DÉZSI Lívia, RADICS Bence, VARGA Tímea Edina, HORTOBÁGYI Tibor, TÖMÖSVÁRI Adrienn, VÉCSEI László, KLIVÉNYI Péter, RAJDA Cecília

CANOMAD (chronic ataxic neuropathy, ophthalmoplegia, M-protein agglutination, disialosyl antibodies) syndrome is a rare polyneuropathy. IgM paraproteins react with ganglioside-containing disialylated epitopes resulting in dorsal root ganglionopathy and B-lymphocyte infiltration of cranial and peripheral nerves. Clinical features include ataxia, slight muscle weakness, areflexia, sensory- and cranial nerve symptoms. Case studies have reported the efficacy of rituximab and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) treatments. We present the case of a 57-year-old man, who had difficulty walking, with numbness and clumsiness in all limbs. He had areflexia, vibratory sensation loss and ataxia. Laboratory tests showed IgM monoclonal components and disialosyl antibodies in the serum. Nerve conduction studies indicated severe sensorimotor demyelinating polyneuroradiculopathy. Despite IVIg and rituximab treatments, the patient’s disease course gradually worsened and he died of respiratory failure. Neuropathological examination revealed dorsal column- and dorsal root atrophy with mixed mononuclear cell infiltration. This article aims to draw attention to this syndrome, and the use of early potent immunosuppressive treatment to improve patients’ quality of life.

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[Ulcerative carpal tunnel syndrome]

KAMONDI Anita, TEIXEIRA Jose Maria, SZIRMAI Imre

[The carpal tunnel syndrome is the most frequent compression-induced neuropathy. A severe but rare clinical manifestation of this disorder associates with ulceration, acral osteo-lysis and mutilation of the terminal phalanges of the second and third fingers. Recognition of this disorder is difficult, because various dermatological and internal diseases might lead to acral ulcerative lesions, and these patients are seldom referred to neurological and/or electrodiagnostic examination. In this article, we present three cases of this rare clinical form of carpal tunnel syndrome and discuss the electrodiagnostic findings. The early diagnosis is important since decompression of the median nerve in due time might prevent mutilation and could significantly improve the patients’ quality of life.]