Hypertension and nephrology

[ACCREDITED CONTINUING TRAINING]

APRIL 29, 2021

Hypertension and nephrology - 2021;25(2)

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Hypertension and nephrology

[Current evidence on the accuracy and precision of non-invasive cardiac output monitoring]

VÉGH Anna, REUSZ S György

[Purpose of review: Assessing cardiac output (CO) is an important part of monitoring the hemodynamically unstable patients. Different non-invasive CO measurement devices are currently available, that can be useful in various clinical situations. The purpose of this article is to review current literature on commonly employed methods especially regarding their accuracy and precision. Results: Most of the devices, especially the non-invasive ones have the disadvantage of questionable accuracy and precision. Generally speaking, the more a method is based on assumptions and mathematical models, the less precise it will be. There is also significant heterogeneity between individual studies. Clinically it is important to consider the purpose of the measurement before choosing a method. In terms of accuracy the most reliable ones are, the ones that are based on simple physical principles and minimal assumptions, for example transthoracic echocardiography, and thermodilution. Conclusions: To have better comparability between individual studies it would be imperative to have standardized study protocols regarding the number of cardiac cycles assessed, the used method, the clinical environment, the age and clinical condition of the study population.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[At the doorstep of an attitude change: our novel knowledge on renal fibrosis in chronic kidney disease]

BUKOSZA Nóra Éva

[In spite of the diverse etiology, chronic kidney disease is finally leading to end-stage renal disease uniformly by the fibrotic transformation of the kidneys. In recent years – mainly due to experimental data – the explanation of this transformation changed profoundly: it has been revealed, that renal fibrosis is a dynamic, actively ongoing process involving many keyfactors. Influencing these factors, give us hope to prevent the progression of chronic kidney disease. This review summarizes the connection of renal fibrosis and chronic kidney disease, the results of the widely used different methods and the recently discovered mechanisms, which caused paradigm change in this topic]

Hypertension and nephrology

[When should antihypertensive be taken: in the morning and/or evening? Chronopharmacotherapy of hypertension in practice]

SZAUDER Ipoly

[The circadian (24-hour) variability of blood pressure (BP) is influenced by constant and variable (external and internal) factors. With this in mind and by determining the type of hypertension with a 24-hour blood pressure monitoring (ABPM), individual chronopharmacological (chronopharmacotherapy) treatment can be planned. There are significant differences in the chronokinetics of antihypertensive drugs administered at different times. Their therapeutic range and efficacy depend significantly on their circadian timing. Although the most modern antihypertensives have a 24-hour effect, they are not able to lower blood pressure at all times. Morning intake of ACE inhibitors, ARB-s, alpha-blockers mainly affect the afternoon and early evening rise, while evening intake reduces nocturnal and morning rise. Calcium channel blockers, beta-blockers (except carvedilol and labetolol), do not affect the circadian blood pressure profile. Therefore, in nondipper hypertension or in the case of morning rise, the twice daily morning and evening administration is more effective than the single morning administration. (Usually a lower dose is sufficient in the evening.) Adequate control of nocturnal or morning blood pressure elevations can be achieved with medication taken in the evening. According to the relevant studies the conclusion is that there is no convincing evidence that the administration of BP-lowering drugs in the evening provides any significant advantage in terms of quality of BP control, prevention of target organ damage or reduction of cardiovascular events, so evening intake only is not recommended. In particular the administration of antihypertensive drugs at bedtime, especially in the case of elderly patients may cause excessive BP fall at night with increased risk of silent cerebral infarct and the myocardial ischemia in patients with coronary heart disease.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Primary aldosteronism, the mysterious object of desire – in the context of a study]

BAJNOK László

[The aldosterone-producing adenoma, aldosteronoma, the actual Conn syndrome, is a relatively well-defined entity, while the separability of idiopathic hyperaldosteronism and low-renin primary hypertension appears to be inherently uncertain according to our current knowledge. In this way, the diagnosis of primary aldosteronism (PA) is in fact more or less probabilistic and this also contributes fundamentally to the uncertainty of prevalence data. These are confirmed by a recent study in which PA was evaluated in the form of 24- hour urinary aldosterone excretion measured with oral salt loading instead of the standard technique. The paper has contributed to the change of paradigm by which the chair of the most widely accepted PA guideline, renewed in 2016, called to be jettisoned much of it.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Covid-19 and peripheral arterial disease]

FARKAS Katalin

[Patients with peripheral vascular disease (PAD) are negatively affected by the coronavirus epidemic in several ways. Fewer-than-usual doctor-patient encounters make it more difficult to detect disease or disease progression. Outbreaks due to the epidemic reinforce a sedentary lifestyle that can mask the symptoms of PAD through lack of exercise. Another risk is that patients with cardiovascular disease are at risk for severe Covid-19 disease, and have a significantly increased risk of mortality. In the case of home treatment of Covid-19 infection in a patient with PAD, close observation is required to make a timely decision on the need for hospitalization. Vaccination, which is gradually available to all PAD patients, could be the solution to prevent the disease.]

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[Feeding and eating in infancy and early childhood part II. - Breastfeeding, complementary feeding and weaning in the Large-sample of the “For Healthy Offspring” project]

NÉMETH Tünde, VÁRADY Erzsébet, DANIS Ildikó, SCHEURING Noémi, SZABÓ László

[INTRODUCTION - Complementary feed-ing is the transitional period from exclusive breastfeeding to family foods, while breastfeeding is continued. It should be started, when breastmilk itself no longer meets the infant’s nutritional requirements, ideally at the age of around 6 months. SUBJECTS AND METHODS - In the Healthy Offspring project self reported questionnaires were received from 1133 parents of 0-3 year old children. Comple­mentary feeding practices and issues of weaning were analyzed. RESULTS - In our sample complementary feeding was started at the age of 5.5±1.8 months. 6% of infants younger than 4 months and about two third of infants at the age between 4 and 6 months were started on complementary feeding. 32% of the 7-12 month old infants were continued on breastfeeding. The proportion of breastfed infants and young children in the 12-24 and 25-36 month age group was 24% and 5.5% respectively. The daily feeding frequency of breastfed infants was 6.7±1.6. The infants and young children, who were breastfed along with complementary feeding were feeding 5.6±1.5 times/day. After completed weaning the range of feeding frequency was limited to 4.9±0.9 occasions/day. 60.4% of mothers regarded their feeding style on demand, while 39.6% on set schedule. 16% of mothers reported that their child had feeding difficulties. CONCLUSIONS - Complementary feeding indicators should be part of infant feeding data collection, such as time of introduction of complementary food, feeding frequency, food consistency, energy density of food and safe preparation. Responsive feeding is part of responsive parenting and should be promoted, along with continuing breastfeeding at least till one year of age, and for as long as mother and infant wish to continue. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

How to minimize the risk for headache? A lumbar puncture practice questionnaire study

JONATAN Salzer, RAJDA Cecilia, SUNDSTRÖM Peter, MATTIAS Vågberg, VÉCSEI László, ANDERS Svenningsson

Background - To lower the risk for post lumbar puncture (LP) headache the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) recommended using small bore atraumatic needles together with stylet reinsertion in a report from 2005. It is unclear whether these recommendations are followed or not. Objectives - To investigate the diagnostic LP preferences with respect to the AAN guidelines among neurologists by use of a short online questionnaire, and to review previously published literature on the subject. Results - A total of 284 respondents who performed diagnostic LPs completed the questionnaire. Almost half (41%) answered that they always use atraumatic needles. The most common reason (73%) for not using atraumatic needles was that these were not available. Less than half of the respondents who performed LPs had knowledge about the AAN guidelines for diagnostic LPs, and 48-76% agreed with the different recommendations therein. Five previously (1998-2015) published studies investigating LP practice among neurologists were identified. The reported frequency of atraumatic needle use (always/routinely) varied between 2 and 16%. Discussion - Atraumatic needle use was more common in this study compared with previous publications. There is still skepticism regarding some of the AAN recommendations, and needle availability appears to be the most important factor preventing atraumatic needle use. To increase the use of atraumatic needles we may perform additional studies investigating their potential benefits, and arrange training sessions for neurologists to increase their awareness and level of comfort with the atraumatic LP technique.

Clinical Neuroscience

[The Expanded Disability Status Scale scoring in patients with multiple sclerosis]

FÜVESI Judit

[Gait disturbance is a major symptom in patients with multiple sclerosis. The Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) was first used in clinical trials of multiple sclerosis for the assessment of disability, however it has become more and more widely used in clinical practice as well. Nowadays its use is essential in application of the new diagnostic criteria, the new clinical form classification and in monitoring the efficacy of therapies. EDSS is based on a standardised neurological examination, but focuses on those symptoms that are frequent in multiple sclerosis. Based on the examination it assesses seven functional systems: visual, brainstem, pyramidal, cerebellar, sensory, bowel-bladder and cerebral functions. EDSS scores can be determined based on the scores given in the functional systems and on testing the walking distance. In newer versions the “Ambulation score” has been added. This chapter clarifies the scores based on the maximal walking distance and the need for a walking aid to walk this distance. The Neurostatus/EDSS training method improves the reproducibility of the standardised neurological examination that forms the basis of the EDSS scoring. Of the tests assessing walking, the Timed-25 Foot Walk Test and the self-administered 12-Item Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale are suitable for routine evaluation of walking performance. An increase of more than 20% in the Timed-25 Foot Walk may be considered a significant change in gait. ]

LAM KID

[New findings in the cortical bone biology and its role in bone fractures]

BALOGH Ádám, BHATTOA Harjit Pál

[The authors surveyed the already known factors responsible for the osteoporotic bone fragility. Then the results of using modern imaging techniques (micro-CT, high-resolution peripheral computed quantitative tomograph - HR-pQCT) and advanced computer analytic methods (finite element analysis, FEA) are presented. These data - beyond the already known fracture risk factors (age, risk of falling, bone mineral density - BMD, and fine structure damage of trabecular bone) are stressing the importance of the (micro)damage of cortical bone as a fracture risk factor, which has been still underrated. The cortical thickening and increased porosity - verified on various population samples - are increasing the risk of fractures in certain subgroups of subjects having identical BMD values, even among those, who are considered only osteopenic by the earlier classification based on BMD values. Backed with modern software batteries, the new imaging techniques are expected to enter clinical application in the near future. Pharmacologic agents with stronger cortical effect are already available and research is continuing to find new drugs to use in the management of osteoporotic patients of high fracture risk.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Education and psychological support of parents in cases of postnatally detected Down syndrome]

MÁTÉ Orsolya, KÍVÉS Zsuzsanna, OLÁH András, FULLÉR Noémi, PAKAI Annamária

[OBJECTIVE - Since the 60’s several publications dealt with the phenomenon how physicians inform parents of newborns about postnatal recognition of Down’s syndrome and the support they receive right after breaking the bad news. Howe - ver, the rest of these studies concentrated on surveying parental satisfaction, while relatively few international studies deal with the other side of the communicational situation, the opinion of the informer. Our study focused on the circumstances of parental information in Hungarian institutions of obstetrics in order to evaluate the possibilities for interventions. METHODS - The Down’s team operating at the University of Pécs Faculty of Health Sciences carried out a national survey in 2005 - an interview-based questionnaire filled by physicians of institutions of obstetrics - with the help of the National Register for Congenital Diseases of the National Centre for Epidemiology and Down’s Foun dation. RESULTS - The coverage of the survey reached 74%. Rest of the surveyed institutions did not have information protocol, however, 70% of them believes it would be necessary. Only 44% of the physicians received communication training and 81% of them believe they can manage communication, 33% have felt that the mother of a newborn with Down’s syndrome would expect special help that the institutions are unable to provide. CONCLUSION - There are serious problems with the circumstances of parental informing in Hungarian institutions of obstetrics. This situation would obviously require intervention. An aimed communicational training based on international experience and exploiting the openness of physicians, as well as the establishment of information protocol could be elements of such intervention.]