Hungarian Radiology

[World Congress of IRPA - Buenos Aires, October 19-24th, 2008.]

PORUBSZKY Tamás

OCTOBER 20, 2009

Hungarian Radiology - 2009;83(03)

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Hungarian Radiology

[Pen Club How much is a man worth above 65 year? Ultrasonography guided delivery A radiologist’s take on speciality-based literature]

ENGLONER László, HERBERT Zsuzsanna, WENINGER Csaba

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[Ultrasound diagnostics: method or art?]

HARKÁNYI Zoltán

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[Role of imaging in the managment of colorectal cancer]

JEDERÁN Éva, GŐDÉNY Mária

[Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide and the second most common cause of cancer death in Hungary. Diagnosis requires the examination of the entire large bowel by means of radiological and/or endoscopic techniques. Colorectal cancer primarily develops from adenomatous polyp over a period of 10-15 years. Tumour staging is crucial for the prognosis and for the planning of the most suitable anticancer therapy. The role of imaging in colorectal cancer is increasing with the change in complex tumour therapy. With advances in ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques accuracy of imaging has improved. The accuracy of CT improved with the advent of the multislice technique (MDCT). Sensitivity and specificity of CT colonography (CTC) in colon polyps and cancer is over 90%, therefore it is one of the screening tools. Accuracy of the CTC is comparable to the optical colonoscopy, complements conventional colonoscopy well and it is an effective tool in the right hands. Endorectal US (ERUS) depicts the anatomic layers of the rectal wall with high degree of accuracy, therefore it is the best method for the evaluation of the lower tumour stage. High resolution MRI is the most suitable technique for predicting rectal tumor stage, therefore it has been established as the standard for preoperative assessment of rectal cancer.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Paraclinical “röntgen” forum Measurements on x-ray equipments: towards quality and safety - Budapest, June 9th, 2009.]

GÁSPÁRDY Géza

Hungarian Radiology

[Ways of imaging the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor]

KOROM Csaba, KARLINGER Kinga

[The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors (VEGFR) signal-transduction pathway play a key role in the regulation of angiogenesis. It was originally isolated as a selective mitogen for endothelial cells and as a powerful vascular permeability increasing factor. The vascular imaging techniques make the quantification and localization of blood vessels possible. They have been used to assess blood flow, oxygenation, and vascular permeability. Also, they can be used to examine the molecular and cellular difference in the vascular wall. To evaluate tumour vascularity, a multimodality approach is expanding. VEGF as the primary mediator for vascular-permeability is indirectly measurable with DCE-MRI (dynamic contrastenhanced MRI). MRI investigation can determine the ratio of deoxyhemoglobin/oxyhemoglobin in order to localize the hypoxic regions in vivo (BOLD [blood oxygen-level dependent] sequence and OMRI [Overhauser MRI]). In molecular MRI (mMRI), contrast agent-mediated alteration of tissue relaxation times can allow for the detection and localization of molecular disease markers. To localize the expression of VEGFR with SPECT and PET, antibodies and VEGF isoforms can be marked with isotopes. VEGFR is an excellent candidate for targeted ultrasound imaging since it is almost exclusively expressed on activated endothelial cells. Optical imaging is a relatively cheap method suitable so far primarily for small animal studies.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

Evaluation of anxiety, depression and marital relationships in patients with migraine

DEMIR Fıgen Ulku, BOZKURT Oya

Aim - The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and characteristics of attacks in patients with migraine, to determine the effects of anxiety or depressive symptoms, and to evaluate the marital relationships of patients with migraine. Method - Thirty patients who were admitted to the neurology outpatient clinic of our hospital between July 2018 and October 2018 and were diagnosed with migraine according to the 2013 International Headache Society (IHS) diagnostic criteria were included in this cross-sectional study. Age, sex, headache frequency and severity, depressive traits, marital satisfaction and anxiety status were examined. We used the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Maudsley Marital Questionnaire (MMQ) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for measuring relevant parameters. Results - The mean severity of migraine pain according to VAS scale was 6.93 ± 1.41 and the mean number of migraine attacks was 4.50 ± 4.24. The mean BDI score of the patients was 12.66 ± 8.98, the mean MMQ-M score was 19.80 ± 12.52, the mean MMQ-S score was 13.20 ± 9.53, the mean STAI-state score was 39.93 ± 10.87 and the mean STAI-trait score was 45.73 ± 8.96. No significant correlation was found between age, number of migraine attacks, migraine duration, migraine headache intensity, and BDI, STAI and MMQ scores (p>0.05). But there was a positive correlation between MMQ-S and scores obtained from the BDI and STAI-state scales (p<0.05). Conclusion - In this study more than half of the migraine patients had mild, moderate or severe depression. A positive correlation was found between sexual dissatisfaction and scale scores of depression and anxiety.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Earlier and more efficiently: the role of deep brain stimulation for parkinson’s disease preserving the working capabilities]

DELI Gabriella, BALÁS István, KOMOLY Sámuel, DÓCZI Tamás, JANSZKY József, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, NAGY Ferenc, BOSNYÁK Edit, KOVÁCS Norbert

[Background – The recently published “EarlyStim” study demonstrated that deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) with early fluctuations is superior to the optimal pharmacological treatment in improving the quality of life and motor symptoms, and preserving sociocultural position. Our retrospective investigation aimed to evaluate if DBS therapy was able to preserve the working capabilities of our patients. Methods – We reviewed the data of 39 young (<60 years-old) PD patients who underwent subthalamic DBS implantation at University of Pécs and had at least two years follow-up. Patients were categorized into two groups based on their working capabilities: Patients with active job (“Job+” group, n=15) and retired patients (without active job, “Job-” group, n=24). Severity of motor symptoms (UPDRS part 3), quality of life (EQ-5D) and presence of active job were evaluated one and two years after the operation. Results – As far as the severity of motor symptoms were concerned, similar (approximately 50%) improvement was achieved in both groups. However, the postoperative quality of life was significantly better in the Job+ group. Majority (12/15, 80%) of Job+ group members were able to preserve their job two years after the operation. However, only a minimal portion (1/24, 4.2%) of the Job- group members was able to return to the world of active employees (p<0.01, McNemar test). Conclusion – Although our retrospective study has several limitations, our results fit well with the conclusions of “EarlyStim” study. Both of them suggest that with optimal timing of DBS implantation we may preserve the working capabilities of our patients.]

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