Hungarian Radiology

[Voiding sonocystography with ultrasound contrast material for the diagnosis of vesicoureteral reflux]

KIS Éva1

DECEMBER 21, 2009

Hungarian Radiology - 2009;83(04)

[Voiding sonocystography with intravesical administration of ultrasound contrast agent is a sensitive method to detect vesicoureteral reflux without irradiation. Depicting microbubbles in the ureters and collecting system is feasible even with very small amounts of a second-generation ultrasound contrast agent, Sonovue. The reflux is graded (I-V) in a similar manner to the system used in voiding cystourethrography. In this article a detailed description is presented.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Semmelweis Egyetem, I. Sz. Gyermekgyógyászati Klinika, Budapest

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[Infections associated to vesicoureteral reflux disease in children below 1 year of age: the infulence of continuous antibiotic prophylactic therapy on the prevalence of resistant pathogenic bacteria]

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[Background: The primary goal when children with vesicoureteral reflux disease (VUR) are treated is the prevention of pyelonephritis and persisting renal damage. Continuous antibiotic prophylaxis (CAP) is usually applied to reach this aim. The selection of resisting pathogens is the major risk of CAP. The aim of our survey was to describe the patterns of pathogenic strains leading to pyelonephritis in patients treated with and without CAP. Patients and method: The pathogenic strains implicated in pyelonephritis were identified in 48 and 56 children below 1 year of age who were treated with or without CAP, respectively, between years 2006 and 2011. Results: Breakthrough urinary tract infections developing in the presence of CAP are more frequently (with about a double risk) caused by polyresistant bacteria compared to infections that emerged without CAP. Nevertheless, it should be noted that the prevalence of resistant pathogens was about 40% even in infants without CAP. Discussion: The pattern of pathogenic strains leading to pyelonephritis alters significantly even in the cohort of children below 1 year of age treated with CAP to prevent infections associated to VUR. The risk may be decreased through the rational use of antibiotics. To reach this goal national guidelines on VUR should be updated and the role of additional non-antibiotic treatment should be established.]

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[Voiding sonocystography with ultrasound contrast material for the diagnosis of vesicoureteral reflux]

KIS Éva

[Voiding sonocystography with intravesical administration of ultrasound contrast agent is a sensitive method to detect vesicoureteral reflux without irradiation. Depicting microbubbles in the ureters and collecting system is feasible even with very small amounts of a second-generation ultrasound contrast agent, Sonovue. The reflux is graded (I-V) in a similar manner to the system used in voiding cystourethrography. In this article a detailed description is presented.]

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