Hungarian Radiology

[The role of static MR-urography in diagnostics of urinary obstruction]

KIS Zsuzsanna, FAZEKAS Péter, KULCSÁR Dániel, KÖTELES Márta, KOVÁCS Annamária, MAGYAR Klára

DECEMBER 20, 2006

Hungarian Radiology - 2006;80(07-08)

[INTRODUCTION - The idea and methodology of MRurography has just crystallized recently due to the development of technology. The traditional MRU technology means the strongly T2 weighted sequence, suitable for depicting stationary liquid spaces. Its use is independent of the functional status of the kidneys thus it is suitable for depicting dilatated ureters in case of nonfunctioning kidneys, too. Authors's aim was to define the role of sMRU in the diagnostics of obstructive urinary diseases. PATIENTS AND METHODS - 60 sMRU examinations were performed on 59 patients using a 1.5 T Siemens Symphony MR scanner in the CT-MR Laboratory of the Markhot Ferenc County Hospital between May 1, 2003 and October 31, 2005. The sMRU was performed with 2D T2 TSE sequence with angiographic character. In each case, the examinations were completed with conventional sequences in multiple planes. The role of gadolinium enhanced T1-weighted MR urography in the same diseases was not studied. In 7 cases, low-dose thin slice CT examination was performed to reveal the precise cause of obstruction. The examinations were preceded by abdominal ultrasound or intravenous urography (IVU). RESULTS - Out of the 60 sMRU examinations uretery dilatation were observed in 50 cases. In the background of obstruction, stone could be detected in 13 patients, dilatation was observed in 4 patients and MR did not indicate stone. In 7 cases with known neoplastic disease, associated urinary obstruction could be detected. In the background of obstruction primary neoplasm was found in 10 patients unknown prior the MR examination. Other benign obstruction occurred in 13 cases. Obstruction was not proved in 10 patients. In these cases the examination was justified by uncertain ultrasound findings together with abnormal renal function parameters. Follow up sMRU was performed in one patient. False diagnosis was established in two patients, the cause of dilatation was not found in one patient. CONCLUSIONS - The sMRU examination can provide more precise detection of the causes of severe urinary obstructions. It helps to define the level of obstruction in case of known malignant tumors. The grade of urinary dilatation could be also evaluated. The sMRU examination in conjunction with conventional sequences in multiple planes made possible to set up a correct therapy plan.]

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