Hungarian Radiology

[The possibilities of CT and MR imaging in hydrocarbon research]

BOGNER Péter, FÖLDES Tamás, ZÁVODA Ferenc, REPA Imre

OCTOBER 20, 2003

Hungarian Radiology - 2003;77(05)

[INTRODUCTION - Cross-sectional medical imaging techniques were applied on geological samples (cores) in order to reveal their morphological and functional properties. Our aim was to reveal those CT and MRI methods that are capable to characterize certain petrophysical parameters and can be correlated with core morphology. MATERIALS AND METHODS - Similarly to pre- and postcontrast scanning in human diagnostic imaging CT scans of core samples were obtained in dry and flooded state, that helped to define and calculate morphological and functional parameters. Several MRI sequences were also tested, mainly spin-echos with short echo time. RESULTS - Several hundred meters of core samples have been examined in the last three years. Effective porosity can be calculated from CT data, that characterizes oil/gas storage capacity of the given geological formation. CT information is superior to conventional petrophysical methods due to its spatial resolution. Nevertheless, we can not quantify permeabilty yet, but describe it qualitatively. We found only limited use of medical MR imaging methods. DISCUSSION - Cross-sectional imaging, primarily CT scanning was introduced to the Hungarian oil and gas industry in the last three years. It seems that the method will be used more and more frequently through the entire process of oil/gas exploitation. Our further goals include the implementation of the CT measurements in other areas like environment control, and further develope measurement conditions.]

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