Hungarian Radiology

[The 2008 Lányi Márton award went to dr. Éva Szabó]

GÖBLYÖS Péter

APRIL 07, 2009

Hungarian Radiology - 2009;83(01)

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Hungarian Radiology

[With renewed outlook and new fortitude]

LOMBAY Béla

Hungarian Radiology

[Self-expanding metallic stents in intrahepatic biliary strictures after liver transplantation]

DOROS Attila, NÉMETH Andrea, HARTMANN Erika, DEÁK Pál Ákos, JUHAROSI Gyöngyi, LÉNÁRD Zsuzsa, KOZMA Veronika, GÖRÖG Dénes, GERLEI Zsuzsa, FEHÉRVÁRI Imre, NEMES Balázs, KÓBORI László

[INTRODUCTION - Bile duct complications remain a key problem of liver transplantation. Two main types are recognized: anastomotic and intrahepatic. In cases of anastomotic strictures good results can be achieved with surgery or minimally invasive therapy. Intrahepatic stenosis usually requires retransplantation. In this report the results of intrahepatic metallic stent placements are analyzed. PATIENTS AND METHODS - Since 1995, 20 patients with intrahepatic bile strictures were referred for percutaneous treatment. Of 34 percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, 33 successful drainages were performed and 58 balloon dilatations were employed to overcome. In 13 patients, 20 metallic stents were implanted. One bleeding complication was successfully treated with selective embolization. RESULTS - The average follow up time was 35 months. 14 patients have no symptoms, 12 of them after metallic stent placements and 4 of them after retransplantation (2 patients had metallic stents at retransplantation). One patient has metallic stent and an external drain waiting for retransplantation. Three patients died after 7 retransplantations. Two patients died on the waiting list, one with and one without external drain. There were no deaths after successful metallic stent placement. CONCLUSION - After meticulous preparations metallic stent placement is safe and effective in intrahepatic biliary stenosis after liver transplantation. The patients can be stabilized till the retransplantation, or it can even be avoided.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis]

BERÉNYI Zsolt, MORVAY Zita, PALKÓ András

[INTRODUCTION - The xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis is a rare and benign form of lesions associated with diffuse thickening of the gall bladder wall. It is important to recognize it radiologically because it can be mistaken easily for gall bladder carcinoma. The characteristic US, CT and MR findings, however, may be helpful in the differential diagnosis. CASE REPORT - We present the cases of two middleaged female patients suffering from right upper quadrant, radiating abdominal pain for several weeks without occurrence of fever. In both patients, the ultrasound examination revealed marked thickening of the gall bladder wall containing hypoechoic nodules. Further, non-specific sign such as cholecystolithiasis and fine infiltration of the adipose tissue surrounding the gall bladder and dilatation of extrahepatic or intrahepatic bile ducts were visible. On the post contrast CT images, rim enhancement was detectable. MR/MRCP examination showed a sharp delineation of the gall bladder from the liver parenchyma. Both patients underwent cholecystectomy. The pathological examination excluded malignancy and confirmed the diagnosis of xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis. CONCLUSION - The characteristic features of xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis (hypoechoic xanthogranulomas in the markedly thickened gall bladder wall and the presence of calculi) can be detected by ultrasound examination. CT or MRI may play an important role in confirmation of the diagnosis of an inflammatory process and provide useful information in exclusion of gall bladder carcinoma.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt implantation in a patient with severe dilatative cardiomyopathy]

SZALÁNCZY Katalin, LÁZÁR István, STEFÁN János, KALÓ Emil

[INTRODUCTION - Indications for TIPS (transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt) are usually portal hypertension induced by alcoholic or viral cirrhosis. Reported patient underwent TIPS because of a rare indication where his rapidly progressing heart failure lead to rapid deterioration of the splanchnic hypertension. CASE REPORT - A 51 years old male was admitted with severe dilatative cardiomyopathy and atrial fibrillation, generalized edema refractory to conservative treatment, and rapidly worsening hepatic laboratory test results. TIPS implantation achieved improvement of all clinical signs, decreased edema and the patient could finally be discharged. CONCLUSION - TIPS can result in improved quality of life not only in primary hepatic cirrhosis but in other clinical circumstances with portal hypertension.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Difficulties in the diagnosis of ectopic ureter]

KONCZ Júlia, RÉTI Gyula, NYÁRI Edit, SHAIKH M. Shoaib

[INTRODUCTION - Ureter ectopy refers to the distal opening of the ureter at the site of the bladder neck or lower. 70-80% of the ectopic ureters are associated with pyelectasia and duplicated ureters. The incidence of this is 2-3 times higher in females. CASE REPORT - Following is a case report of a boy who was diagnosed with left-sided pyelectasia during a prenatal ultrasound scan. The postnatal ultrasound revealed a duplicated pelviceal cavity and ureter. The upper pole ureter and the pelvis demonstrated dilatation. At 8 months of age a left side heminehprectomy was performed. Two years postoperatively a follow-up ultrasound revealed a dilatation of the ureteral stump on the left side, which progressed. On MCUG the ureteral stump was identified inserting on to the proximal urethra. Cystography and MR urography demonstrated a ureteral stump which inserted on to the urethra. A repeat surgery was performed to remove the stump. Patient is symptom-free ever since. CONCLUSION - In ectopic, non-refluxing ureters long-term follow-up is necessary following heminephrectomy. A ureter stump besides the bladder can cause serious diagnostical difficulties. Also, it is possible that a dilating stump may lead to a reflux not identified earlier. MCUG and MR urography can help to clear delineate the pathology.]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

Electrophysiological investigation for autonomic dysfunction in patients with myasthenia gravis: A prospective study

NALBANTOGLU Mecbure, AKALIN Ali Mehmet, GUNDUZ Aysegul, KIZILTAN Meral

Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder of neuromuscular transmission. Autonomic dysfunction is not a commonly known association with MG. We conducted this study to evaluate autonomic functions in MG & subgroups and to investigate the effects of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. This study comprised 30 autoimmune MG patients and 30 healthy volunteers. Autonomic tests including sympathetic skin response (SSR) and R-R interval variation analysis (RRIV) was carried out. The tests were performed two times for patients who were under acetylcholinesterase inhibitors during the current assessment. The RRIV rise during hyperventilation was better (p=0.006) and Valsalva ratio (p=0.039) was lower in control group. The SSR amplitudes were lower thereafter drug intake (p=0.030). As much as time went by after drug administration prolonged SSR latencies were obtained (p=0.043).Valsalva ratio was lower in the AchR antibody negative group (p=0.033). The findings showed that both ocular/generalized MG patients have a subclinical parasympathetic abnormality prominent in the AchR antibody negative group and pyridostigmine has a peripheral sympathetic cholinergic noncumulative effect.

Hungarian Radiology

[Márton Lányi's memorial tablet]

GÖBLYÖS Péter

Lege Artis Medicinae

[The Mental Eyes of the Anatomist – Beáta Szabó’s Exhibition “The Wounds of Light, the Anatomy of Colours” in the Semmelweis Museum of Medical History ]

CZIGLÉNYI Boglárka

Lege Artis Medicinae

[The László Romics Award – to Boost the Young An Interview with Professor István Karádi ]

KUN J. Viktória

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Physicians’ attitudes and suppositions in 2001 in the Polyclinic of the Hospitaller Brothers in Budapest]

BALÁZS Péter

[INTRODUCTION - Following the total socioeconomic changes in Hungary in 1989, no scientific analysis has been made about physicians' religious attributes in the new circumstances. These attributes, after four decades of political anticlericalism may affect essentially the ideological and socio-economic patterns of medical professionalism. Hungary’s 2001 census favoured such an inquiry, since it went back to the traditional questions about religious affiliations. METHODS - The ”sensitive” questions ot the census were accepted without any obstacle in the whole population and backed up the present study together with the newly established religious atmosphere in the hospital of roman catholic Hospitaller Brothers of St. John of God, which was reopened on the 1st of July, 2000. The collection of data started in November 2000 ending in December 2001. All 98 full time employed physicians participated in the inquiry carried out by personal interviews guided by the same 51 questions. Following more than half a century span, the aim of the present study was to gain measurable information about the doctors’ unknown religious affiliation and its impact on clinical problems with ethical dimensions. RESULTS - All the doctors cooperated willingly in face-to-face interviews. There was a high proportion of religious affiliation (83 persons out of 98) without any sign of mysticism in the professional values. However, the pre-eminent role of psychological factors in the healing process was stressed, opposed to the simplified materialism of medicine. The same ideological pattern was represented while ranking other professions in the social hierarchy. No physicians experienced a conflict between their religious belief and professional activity in the dayto- day service. CONCLUSION - According to the extremely underpaid medical profession in Hungary, doctors of the new hospital do not believe that now they should tolerate their underpaid status as altruistic missionaries. However, they know exactly that balancing professionalism and business of medicine, is not a task for a single hospital but an urgent one of the whole society.]