Hungarian Radiology

[Small bowel perforation due to blunt abdominal trauma in case of an inguinal hernia]

GION Katalin, SÉLEI Ágnes, CSÁSZÁR József, PALKÓ András

DECEMBER 20, 2003

Hungarian Radiology - 2003;77(06)

[INTRODUCTION - The injury of fixed bowel loops occurs more frequently due abdominal trauma. Authors review the CT signs of bowel injury in conjunction of the presented case. PATIENTS, METHODS - The inguinal hernia of the male patient was present for approximately 30 years prior the abdominal trauma. Due to the trauma the fixed small bowel loop became perforated. CT examination, beside using the conventional methods established the diagnosis of bowel wall perforation and the site of the perforation was localized before surgery. CONCLUSIONS - CT provied additional information compared to X-ray and US in the localization of the lesion due to the blunt abdominal trauma.]

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[PURPOSE - Evaluation of different gastrointestinal endoluminal contrast materials by using an experimental model. MATERIALS AND METHODS - Authors constructed a plastic container holding six plastic cups, thus making possible to evaluate different compounds and concentrations, simultaneously. The signal intensity of more than 15 different materials (commonly used contrast materials, fruit juices, cocoa, iron containing solutions) was measured by T1 and T2 weighted spin echo sequences in a 1T MR unit. The results were compared in tables and demonstrated by figures. RESULTS - The plastic container and cups made it possible to evaluate the contrast materials by MR examination. The fruit juices containing metallic components had high signal intensity on T1 weighted images, while on the T2 weighted images showed moderate to high signal intensity except the rosehip syrup and a special blackcurrant extract, which were of low signal intensity. Cocoa drink had low to moderate signal intensity on both the T1 and T2 weighted images. The signal intensity of the iron(III)-desferrioxamin solution increased on the T1 weighted images and decreased on the T2 weighted images in direct proportion to its iron concentration. CONCLUSION - The described in vitro model is an appropriate and risk-free solution for selecting the proper endoluminal contrast material, its concentration, and the best measuring sequences for defining the optimal in vivo MR bowel examination protocol. On the base of the experimental results rosehip syrup, blackcurrant extract, iron(III)- desferrioxamin and cocoa drink were selected for further in vitro and in vivo examinations.]

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