Hungarian Radiology

[Role of ultrasound in the diagnosis of Crohn’s disease]

KUKLA Edit, BEVÍZ József, MAKULA Éva, PALKÓ András, VÁRKONYI Ágnes, FÜZESI Kristóf

JUNE 20, 2003

Hungarian Radiology - 2003;77(03)

[INTRODUCTION - The peak incidence of Crohn’s disease is the second and third decades of life. Twenty-five percent of new cases occur in individuals less than 20 years of age. Typically the clinical presentation of Crohn’s disease is not different in children from in adults. The sudden onset of the disease with serious symptoms is not rare in pediatric patients The signs of acute abdomen, the rapid deterioration of the patient's physical condition needs urgent surgical intervention. Ultrasound is the first imaging method of choice can reveal specific signs of the disease and early accurate diagnosis can be established. The radiation burden can be decreased on this way and the unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. CASE REPORT - A child who presented typical signs of acute appendicitis was investigated first by ultrasound. Based on this investigation the diagnosis of Crohn’s disease was suspected, but unfortunately the adequate diagnosis was established only 5 months later after appendectomy and right sided hemicolectomy. CONCLUSION - Authors draw the attention to the importance of the ultrasound investigation in the diagnosis of Crohn’s disease in the childhood.]

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