Hungarian Radiology

[REPORTAGES Interventional radiology symposium on the 40th anniversary of the foundation of Department of Radiology of Pécs]

WENINGER Csaba

JUNE 10, 2005

Hungarian Radiology - 2005;79(03)

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Hungarian Radiology

[Entertainment ultrasound]

HARKÁNYI Zoltán

Hungarian Radiology

[Past, present and future of Department of Radiology of Pécs]

BATTYÁNY István

Hungarian Radiology

[Prevention of thrombotic complications in vascular interventional procedures]

HORVÁTH László, BATTYÁNY István, ROSTÁS Tamás, HARMAT Zoltán, BODROGI Gabriella, RADICS Éva

[Procedures of vascular interventional radiology is linked inevitably a certain amount of risk of thrombotic complications, like intimal and vascular wall injuries, increased thrombotic risk caused by the catheter itself, etc. The first approach of thrombotic prevention was achieved by acetyl salicylic acid in case of peripheral arteries, this treatment was later replaced by long-term anticoagulation. Opportunities were provided by the recognition of risky blood characteristics in relation to thrombotic complications. Consequently, a well performed preparation and premedication of the patients could reasonably decrease the risk. The most important steps are the cessation of smoking, normalization of hemoconcentration and antithrombotic premedication. Better understanding of the nature of atherosclerotic progression led to the introduction of long-term fibrinolytic inhibition therapy. In the past decades beside patients with vascular stenosis, the oncology patients are also treated by different radiological interventions, like intraarterial chemotherapy and chemoembolization. The use of several-day-long infusion represent a new challenge, the treated vessels, the lumen and the surface of the catheter must be prevented of thrombosis. For this purpose a few suitable drugs can be applied with mild anticoagulant and fibrinolytic stimulating effect. We use the sodium pentosan polysulphate.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Comparison of the results of lung helical CT and lung scintigraphy in pulmonary embolism]

WENINGER Csaba, BODROGI Gabriella, BOROS Szilvia, SCHMIDT Erzsébet, UDVAROS Eszter, ZÁMBÓ Katalin

[INTRODUCTION - The frequency of the pulmonary embolism is high and the underdiagnosis or delayed recognition of the disease occurs. Recently the helical CT is used to detect pulmonary embolism. The authors compare the results of single-slice spiral thoracic CT and lung scan. PATIENTS AND METHODS - During one year period chest CT examination was performed in 49 patients due to the suspicion of pulmonary embolism, in 30 of them lung scan was also performed. RESULTS - The results of the two diagnostic methods were the same in 21 cases out 30 (in 13/21 cases both methods demonstrated embolism and 8/21 cases the findings were normal). In the remaining nine cases the findings were different. CONCLUSIONS - The lung CT examination is a rapid, non-invasive method to depict the central pulmonary embolism and small infarcts in non fresh cases. The negative result of perfusion lung scan can exclude the pulmonary embolism. If the lung scan demonstrates perfusion defect(s), it is necessary to perform another diagnostic tests (e.g. chest X-ray, ventillation scan). While the lung scan is a cheap, simple method with low radiation dose, it can play important role in the screening.]

Hungarian Radiology

[The possibilities of invasive radiological therapy of deep venous thrombosis and in vitro experimental examination of therapeutic factors affecting the treatment]

HARMAT Zoltán, JÁRAY Ákos, BATTYÁNY István

[INTRODUCTION - The first part of this paper is an overview on the possibilities of invasive radiology treatment of deep venous thrombosis. In the next part an in vitro experiment is described demonstrating the basics of mechanical and pharmaco-mechanical catheters applied in deep venous thrombosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS - The in vitro haemodinamic model of the iliocaval veins contained a thermostat and an engine responsable for pulsing circulation according to the venous system. We tested the chance of driftage of thrombus in different age according to the state of the collateral system. Thrombectomy was made by mechanical (Simpson-catheter) and pharmaco-mechanical (Pulsespray catheter) ways. The weight of the non-drifted thrombi was measured. RESULTS - All the 16 thrombus were flown while collateral system was closed and none of them were flown while the collateral system was open but the rate of their solubility was different. The efficacy of the thrombus-removal by Simpson catheter was better than by Pulse-spray catheter and fresh thrombus-fragments were more soluble than older ones. CONCLUSION - By this in vitro experiment we opened the way for using mechanical and pharmaco-mechanical catheters in deep venous thrombosis.]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

[What happens to vertiginous population after emission from the Emergency Department?]

MAIHOUB Stefani, MOLNÁR András, CSIKÓS András, KANIZSAI Péter, TAMÁS László, SZIRMAI Ágnes

[Background – Dizziness is one of the most frequent complaints when a patient is searching for medical care and resolution. This can be a problematic presentation in the emergency department, both from a diagnostic and a management standpoint. Purpose – The aim of our study is to clarify what happens to patients after leaving the emergency department. Methods – 879 patients were examined at the Semmel­weis University Emergency Department with vertigo and dizziness. We sent a questionnaire to these patients and we had 308 completed papers back (110 male, 198 female patients, mean age 61.8 ± 12.31 SD), which we further analyzed. Results – Based on the emergency department diagnosis we had the following results: central vestibular lesion (n = 71), dizziness or giddiness (n = 64) and BPPV (n = 51) were among the most frequent diagnosis. Clarification of the final post-examination diagnosis took several days (28.8%), and weeks (24.2%). It was also noticed that 24.02% of this population never received a proper diagnosis. Among the population only 80 patients (25.8%) got proper diagnosis of their complaints, which was supported by qualitative statistical analysis (Cohen Kappa test) result (κ = 0.560). Discussion – The correlation between our emergency department diagnosis and final diagnosis given to patients is low, a phenomenon that is also observable in other countries. Therefore, patient follow-up is an important issue, including the importance of neurotology and possibly neurological examination. Conclusion – Emergency diagnosis of vertigo is a great challenge, but despite of difficulties the targeted and quick case history and exact examination can evaluate the central or peripheral cause of the balance disorder. Therefore, to prevent declination of the quality of life the importance of further investigation is high.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Dear Reader! Greetings to the 30th anniversary of founding the LAM]

KAPÓCS Gábor

Clinical Neuroscience

Life threatening rare lymphomas presenting as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis: a diagnostic challenge

TOLVAJ Balázs, HAHN Katalin, NAGY Zsuzsanna, VADVÁRI Árpád, CSOMOR Judit, GELPI Ellen, ILLÉS Zsolt, GARZULY Ferenc

Background and aims – Description of two cases of rare intravascular large B-cell lymphoma and secondary T-cell lymphoma diagnosed postmortem, that manifested clinically as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM). We discuss causes of diagnostic difficulties, deceptive radiological and histological investigations, and outline diagnostic procedures based on our and previously reported cases. Case reports – Our first case, a 48-year-old female was admitted to the neurological department due to paraparesis. MRI suggested LETM, but the treatments were ineffective. She died after four weeks because of pneumonia and untreatable polyserositis. Pathological examination revealed intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVL). Our second case, a 61-year-old man presented with headache and paraparesis. MRI showed small bitemporal lesions and lesions suggesting LETM. Diagnostic investigations were unsuccessful, including tests for possible lymphoma (CSF flow cytometry and muscle biopsy for suspected IVL). Chest CT showed focal inflammation in a small area of the lung, and adrenal adenoma. Brain biopsy sample from the affected temporal area suggested T-cell mediated lymphocytic (paraneoplastic or viral) meningoencephalitis and excluded diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The symptoms worsened, and the patient died in the sixth week of disease. The pathological examination of the presumed adenoma in the adrenal gland, the pancreatic tail and the lung lesions revealed peripheral T-cell lymphoma, as did the brain and spinal cord lesions. Even at histological examination, the T-cell lymphoma had the misleading appearance of inflammatory condition as did the MRI. Conclusion – Lymphoma can manifest as LETM. In cases of etiologically unclear atypical LETM in patients older than 40 years, a random skin biopsy (with subcutaneous adipose tissue) from the thigh and from the abdomen is strongly recommended as soon as possible. This may detect IVL and provide the possibility of prompt chemotherapy. In case of suspicion of lymphoma, parallel examination of the CSF by flow cytometry is also recommended. If skin biopsy is negative but lymphoma suspicion remains high, biopsy from other sites (bone marrow, lymph nodes or adrenal gland lesion) or from a simultaneously existing cerebral lesion is suggested, to exclude or prove diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, IVL, or a rare T-cell lymphoma.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Advanced Parkinson’s disease characteristics in clinical practice: Results from the OBSERVE-PD study and sub-analysis of the Hungarian data]

TAKÁTS Annamária, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, VÉCSEI László, KLIVÉNYI Péter, DÉZSI Lívia, ZÁDORI Dénes, VALIKOVICS Attila, VARANNAI Lajos, ONUK Koray, KINCZEL Beatrix, KOVÁCS Norbert

[The majority of patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease are treated at specialized movement disorder centers. Currently, there is no clear consensus on how to define the stages of Parkinson’s disease; the proportion of Parkinson’s patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease, the referral process, and the clinical features used to characterize advanced Parkinson’s disease are not well delineated. The primary objective of this observational study was to evaluate the proportion of Parkinson’s patients identified as advanced patients according to physician’s judgment in all participating movement disorder centers across the study. Here we evaluate the Hungarian subset of the participating patients. The study was conducted in a cross-sectional, non-interventional, multi-country, multi-center format in 18 countries. Data were collected during a single patient visit. Current Parkinson’s disease status was assessed with Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) parts II, III, IV, and V (modified Hoehn and Yahr staging). Non-motor symptoms were assessed using the PD Non-motor Symptoms Scale (NMSS); quality of life was assessed with the PD 8-item Quality-of-Life Questionnaire (PDQ-8). Parkinson’s disease was classified as advanced versus non-advanced based on physician assessment and on questions developed by the Delphi method. Overall, 2627 patients with Parkinson’s disease from 126 sites were documented. In Hungary, 100 patients with Parkinson’s disease were documented in four movement disorder centers, and, according to the physician assessment, 50% of these patients had advanced Parkinson’s disease. Their mean scores showed significantly higher impairment in those with, versus without advanced Parkinson’s disease: UPDRS II (14.1 vs. 9.2), UPDRS IV Q32 (1.1 vs. 0.0) and Q39 (1.1 vs. 0.5), UPDRS V (2.8 vs. 2.0) and PDQ-8 (29.1 vs. 18.9). Physicians in Hungarian movement disorder centers assessed that half of the Parkinson’s patients had advanced disease, with worse motor and non-motor symptom severity and worse QoL than those without advanced Parkinson’s disease. Despite being classified as eligible for invasive/device-aided treatment, that treatment had not been initiated in 25% of these patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

To handle the HaNDL syndrome through a case: The syndrome of headache with neurologic deficits and cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis

ÇOBAN Eda, TEKER Ruken Serap, SERİNDAĞ Helin, SAKALLI Nazan, SOYSAL Aysun

The syndrome of headache with neurologic deficits and cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis (HaNDL) is a rare entity. This disease has been related to migrainous headaches. It is a benign, self-limited disorder, which is characterized by fluctuating neurological symptoms and cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis. We describe a case of a 47 years old man with acute onset of headache and aphasia. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed a lymphocytic pleocytosis (25 cells/μl, 100% lymphocytes). Electroencephalogram showed moderate slow rhythm in the left hemisphere, with temporoparietal predominance, and without epileptiform activity. His blood tests as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results were normal. With the diagnosis of HaNDL syndrome the patient was accepted in the Department of Neurology and discharged with full recovery.