Hungarian Radiology

[Radiology of pancreas: review from the last year - Gastro Update 2007]

FORRAI Gábor

DECEMBER 15, 2008

Hungarian Radiology - 2008;82(07-08)

[PURPOSE - To demonstrate the recent results in radiological diagnostics of pancreas, and the actual place of the imaging and interventional methods. METHOD - Systematic review of the most recent articles from the last year in the following subjects: acute, chronic and autoimmune pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer and other tumors, PET and special imaging problems in pancreas transplantation. RESULTS - Annually, experience in pancreatic diagnostical methods are accumulating rapidly. Therefore, there is a continuous change in the examination algorithm with new diagnostic and therapeutic modalities making their way into the daily routine. Some of the algorithms become obsolete within a few years and their further application is considered mismanagement. Some other methods become obligatory steps in the diagnostics. These are the reasons why up-to-date knowledge of the literature is mandatory.]

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