Hungarian Radiology

[Radiologists - Pécs, 27th June 2008]

SEPTEMBER 20, 2008

Hungarian Radiology - 2008;82(05-06)

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Hungarian Radiology

[Rheumatoid arthritis: significance and methodology of cervical spine X-rays in everyday practice]

NÉMETH Ildikó, BUDAY Ilona, MOLNÁR Éva, NYITRAI Márta, SAÁRY Krisztina, TARKOVÁCS Andrea, VARSÁNYI Nóra, FARBAKY Zsófia

[Cervical spine joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis may lead to progressive vertebral instability. It is a severe risk factor for cord compression, which may even lead to sudden death. Many patients with atlantoaxial subluxation may have no symptoms referable to the neck. True degree of subluxation may occur during anaesthesia when the neck muscles are relaxed and protective spasm is absent. The cervical deformities can be visualised on conventional, transoral and functional lateral view in the flexion and extension positions of the neck. The aim of our study is to demonstrate the usefulness of cervical dynamic X-ray for patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. This is the first classical radiological imaging method in the diagnosis and in radiographic follow-up. It is a very important method in the preoperative evaluation to prevent definitive neurologic injury. We describe the method for screening, measuring and grading cervical subluxations and instability in our everyday routine.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Miklós Barta (ed.): Atlas of ultrasound diagnostics]

BOGNER Péter

Hungarian Radiology

[Use of plain and intravenous contrast material multidetector CT examinations in acute abdomen]

TÓTH László, TÓTH Géza, TURUPOLI Emőke, LOMBAY Béla, PAVLIKOVICS Gábor

[Through most of Europe, multidetector computed tomography is used as the first-line modalitiy for examining the acute abdomen. Acute abdominal pain, symptoms referring to abnormal bowel movements, gastrointestinal bleeding, worsening general state, and other typical clinical signs require quick and precise diagnosis since these conditions are frequently life-threatening. The sensitivity and specificity of CT examinations have significantly improved due to the development of the machinary. Thus, the scope of indications are also expanding. Almost all acute abdominal disorders, that may lead to an acute surgical procedure, can be diagnosed with the help of multidetector CT. Unnecessary surgical procedures, the risk to the patients and also the cost of hospitalization can be reduced using multidetector CT examination.]

Hungarian Radiology

[The bubble-sign of spontaneous pneumoperitoneum]

SZÁNTÓ Dezső

[INTRODUCTION - Pneumoperitoneum is a reliable indicator of serious underlying damage. There are four etiologic categories of extraluminal-intraperitoneal gas collections: spontaneous, iatrogenic, traumatic and criminal perforations. The erect posteroanterior chest radiograph is the most sensitive plain film projection for detecting pneumoperitoneum and it may show 0.5-1 ml free abdominal gas when meticulous radiographic techniques (lateral, oblique, air-gap, lordotic, inspiratory and expiratory exposures) are used. The appearances of extraluminal gas collections are specified by physical rules and individual preferences. The bubble-sign is an uncommon, pathognomonic phenomenon. CASE REPORT - A case of an 86 years old female patient with spontaneous pneumoperitoneum, diagnosed on the basis of the bubble-sign is presented. On erect, lordotic inspiratory chest film, right medial inversion of diaphragm, left pleural effusion, emphysema, cardiomegaly and aortectasia were observed. The bubble-sign and hydromediastinum became evident in the right phrenicocostal angle on expiratory view. Our patient expired before the surgical intervention.The postmortem demonstrated double peptic duodenal ulcers; the older ulcer had penetrated and encapsulated in the hepatoduodenal ligament, while the more recent one perforated through the intraperitoneal space. CONCLUSION - Routine upright chest films are valuable screening tools for uncommon signs of pneumoperitoneum, also.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Address of the New President of Our Society]

BATTYÁNY István

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Clinical Neuroscience

Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: A single center experience and systemic analysis of cases in Turkey

USLU Ilgen Ferda, ELIF Gökçal, GÜRSOY Esra Azize, KOLUKISA Mehmet, YILDIZ Babacan Gulsen

We aimed to analyze the clinical, laboratory and neuroimaging findings in patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in a single center as well as to review other published cases in Turkey. Between January 1st, 2014 and June 31st, 2017, all CJD cases were evaluated based on clinical findings, differential diagnosis, the previous misdiagnosis, electroencephalography (EEG), cerebrospinal fluid and cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in our center. All published cases in Turkey between 2005-2018 were also reviewed. In a total of 13 patients, progressive cognitive decline was the most common presenting symptom. Two patients had a diagnosis of Heidenhain variant, 1 patient had a diagnosis of Oppenheimer-Brownell variant. Seven patients (53.3%) had been misdiagnosed with depression, vascular dementia, normal pressure hydrocephalus or encephalitis. Eleven patients (87%) had typical MRI findings but only 5 of these were present at baseline. Asymmetrical high signal abnormalities on MRI were observed in 4 patients. Five patients (45.4%) had periodic spike wave complexes on EEG, all appeared during the follow-up. There were 74 published cases in Turkey bet­ween 2005 and 2018, with various clinical presentations. CJD has a variety of clinical features in our patient series as well as in cases reported in Turkey. Although progressive cognitive decline is the most common presenting symptom, unusual manifestations in early stages of the disease might cause misdiagnosis. Variant forms should be kept in mind in patients with isolated visual or cerebellar symptoms. MRI and EEG should be repeated during follow-up period if the clinical suspicion still exists.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Earlier and more efficiently: the role of deep brain stimulation for parkinson’s disease preserving the working capabilities]

DELI Gabriella, BALÁS István, KOMOLY Sámuel, DÓCZI Tamás, JANSZKY József, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, NAGY Ferenc, BOSNYÁK Edit, KOVÁCS Norbert

[Background – The recently published “EarlyStim” study demonstrated that deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) with early fluctuations is superior to the optimal pharmacological treatment in improving the quality of life and motor symptoms, and preserving sociocultural position. Our retrospective investigation aimed to evaluate if DBS therapy was able to preserve the working capabilities of our patients. Methods – We reviewed the data of 39 young (<60 years-old) PD patients who underwent subthalamic DBS implantation at University of Pécs and had at least two years follow-up. Patients were categorized into two groups based on their working capabilities: Patients with active job (“Job+” group, n=15) and retired patients (without active job, “Job-” group, n=24). Severity of motor symptoms (UPDRS part 3), quality of life (EQ-5D) and presence of active job were evaluated one and two years after the operation. Results – As far as the severity of motor symptoms were concerned, similar (approximately 50%) improvement was achieved in both groups. However, the postoperative quality of life was significantly better in the Job+ group. Majority (12/15, 80%) of Job+ group members were able to preserve their job two years after the operation. However, only a minimal portion (1/24, 4.2%) of the Job- group members was able to return to the world of active employees (p<0.01, McNemar test). Conclusion – Although our retrospective study has several limitations, our results fit well with the conclusions of “EarlyStim” study. Both of them suggest that with optimal timing of DBS implantation we may preserve the working capabilities of our patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Relationship between Status Epilepticus Severity Score and etiology in adult NCSE patients

GENC Fatma, ERDAL Abidin, AKCA Gizem, KARACAY Ertan, GÖKSU Özaydın Eylem, KUTLU Gülnihal, GÖMCELI Bicer Yasemin

Purpose - Nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) is a heterogeneous, severe neurological disorder of different etiologies. In this study, the outcomes of NCSE episodes was assessed in a large series of adult patients. Our objective was to evaluate relationship between Status Epilepticus Severity Score (STESS) and etiology and the role of etiological factors on predicting the outcomes. Method - In this retrospective study, the medical records of 95 patients over 18 years of age who were diagnosed with NCSE between June 2011 and December 2015 were reviewed. Their treatment and follow-up for NCSE was performed at the Epilepsy Unit in Department of Neurology, Antalya Research and Training Hospital. Etiological factors thought to be responsible for NCSE episodes as well as the prognostic data were retrieved. The etiological factors were classified into three groups as those with a known history of epilepsy (Group 1), primary neurological disorder (Group 2), or systemic/unknown etiology (Group 3). STESS was retrospectively applied to patients. Results - There were 95 participants, 59 of whom were female. Group 1, Group 2, and Group 3 consisted of 11 (7 female), 54 (33 female), and 30 (19 female) patients, respectively. Of the 18 total deaths, 12 occurred in Group 2, and 6 in Group 3. The negative predictive value for a STESS score of ≤ 2 was 93.88% (+LR 2.05 95% CI: 1.44-2.9 and -LR 0.3 95% CI 0.10-0.84 ) in the overall study group. While the corresponding values for Group 1 (patients with epilepsy), Group 2 (patients with primary neurological disorder), and group 3 (patients with systemic or unknown etiology) were 100%, 92.59% (+LR 2.06 95%CI: 1.32-3.21 and -LR 0.28 95% CI 0.08-1.02 ) 83.33% (+LR 1.14 95%CI: 0.59-2.9 and -LR 0.80 95% CI 0.23-2.73). Conclusions - This study included the one of the largest patients series ever reported in whom STESS, a clinical scoring system proposed for use in patients with status epilepticus, has been implemented. Although STESS appeared to be quite useful for predicting a favorable outcome in NCSE patients with epilepsy and primary neurological disorders, its predictive value in patients with systemic or unknown etiology was lower. Further prospective studies including larger NCSE samples are warranted.

Hungarian Radiology

[Conference of the Senior Club and Youth Committee of the Society of the Hungarian Radiologists]

BARKOVICS Mária

Hungarian Radiology

[Necrotizing enterocolitis in neonatology: comparing the role of X-ray and ultrasonographic examinations]

JENEI Mónika, VÁRKONYI Ildikó, NYITRAI Anna, SZABÓ Miklós, BOKODI Géza, KIS Éva

[INTRODUCTION - The authors’ purpose was to analyse the role of abdominal ultrasonography (US) in the diagnosis of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). They have compared the sensitivity of the current standard diagnostic modalities for this clinical entity: plain abdominal radiography and abdominal US. For a more objective comparison, they created an US scale along with utilising the score system based on abdominal radiography which was published recently. PATIENTS AND METHODS - 46 out of 76 neonates having both clinical and radiological diagnosis of NEC had comparable radiographic and sonographic examinations between June 2006 and October 2009. The authors created a 10-grade US score system, in which sonographic signs of NEC are listed in order of severity, corresponding, where possible with the radiographic scale that was available. The findings were scored individually, then the distribution of scores and their relationship to each other were analysed. For further analysis four groups of severity based on the scores were created with the following categories: mild, moderate, severe and very severe. After graphical representation of the groups, the relationship of the groups created on the basis of scoring the findings by the two diagnostic methods were examined. RESULTS - According to this analysis both abdominal radiographs and sonographs are suitable for diagnosing NEC, which has been justified with statistical data. When analysing the severity groups the authors proved that the two methods diverge in judging groups 3 and 4, thus severe and very severe. The distributions of severity groups formed by the two imaging modalities are different, (P<0,01); and the proportion of group 3 and group 4 is different in case of US and radiographic examinations (P=0.003). CONCLUSIONS - Abdominal sonography and radiography are equally suitable diagnostic methods for diagnosing NEC, and the two methods match each other very well. In cases of mild state, the severity of the disease was found to be the same with both methods, but US allows more sensitive differentiation of serious cases. It is very sensitive in detecting perforations, so it could play a role in determining the indication of surgery.]