Hungarian Radiology

[Radiological diagnostics in head and neck malignancies - Onco Update, 2006]

GŐDÉNY Mária, BODOKY György

JUNE 20, 2007

Hungarian Radiology - 2007;81(03-04)

[Imaging plays a crucial role in defining disease burden and thus therapy planning in head and neck cancer (HNC). Lately accuracy of pretreatment staging has become critical since non-surgical therapy has become a widely accepted treatment possibility. The referring clinician is responsible for accurate data collection, pretreatment staging, evaluation of therapy response and post-treatment evaluation of the HNC. Correctness of these highly depends on the expertise and experience of the evaluating radiologist therefore being familiar with the latest literature is essential. This article is a review of papers published in 2005 and 2006 focusing on the clinical significance of the latest imaging results in head and neck cancer diagnostics.]

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