Hungarian Radiology

[Pediatric Radiology]

LOMBAY Béla

OCTOBER 20, 2003

Hungarian Radiology - 2003;77(05)

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Hungarian Radiology

[The 13th Symposium of Pediatric Radiology Balatonszéplak, 28-30 August 2003]

VÁRKONYI Ildikó

Hungarian Radiology

[Information from the Society of Hungarian Radiologists Board on the 2003 Membership Fees]

Hungarian Radiology

[The possibilities of CT and MR imaging in hydrocarbon research]

BOGNER Péter, FÖLDES Tamás, ZÁVODA Ferenc, REPA Imre

[INTRODUCTION - Cross-sectional medical imaging techniques were applied on geological samples (cores) in order to reveal their morphological and functional properties. Our aim was to reveal those CT and MRI methods that are capable to characterize certain petrophysical parameters and can be correlated with core morphology. MATERIALS AND METHODS - Similarly to pre- and postcontrast scanning in human diagnostic imaging CT scans of core samples were obtained in dry and flooded state, that helped to define and calculate morphological and functional parameters. Several MRI sequences were also tested, mainly spin-echos with short echo time. RESULTS - Several hundred meters of core samples have been examined in the last three years. Effective porosity can be calculated from CT data, that characterizes oil/gas storage capacity of the given geological formation. CT information is superior to conventional petrophysical methods due to its spatial resolution. Nevertheless, we can not quantify permeabilty yet, but describe it qualitatively. We found only limited use of medical MR imaging methods. DISCUSSION - Cross-sectional imaging, primarily CT scanning was introduced to the Hungarian oil and gas industry in the last three years. It seems that the method will be used more and more frequently through the entire process of oil/gas exploitation. Our further goals include the implementation of the CT measurements in other areas like environment control, and further develope measurement conditions.]

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[Ultrasound is not a stetoscope]

HARKÁNYI Zoltán

[Introduction of the small size, portable ultrasound machines opened new opportunities in ultrasound imaging. The optimal application of these equipments and the new problems related to the use are widely discussed in the literature. This brief review summarizes the advantages, main indication and limitations of the method. The single most important aspect for the patient is that emergency ultrasound examination should be available regardless of the profession of the doctors. The most difficult question is how to provide and control an optimal education and training for the doctors. Possible solutions are also discussed. It is predictable that the availablity of the portable ultrasound studies will significantly increase the number of examinations, therefore economical consequences must also be considered. The author disagree with the conception, which states that ultrasound machine can be used as a stetoscop in the doctor's pocket.]

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[György Csákány MD has Passed Away 1920-2003]

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