Hungarian Radiology

[Nobel prize scientists- Pioneers in imaging diagnostics]

KISS-TÓTH Emőke1, KUN Gáborné2, LOMBAY Béla3

MARCH 22, 2008

Hungarian Radiology - 2008;82(01-02)

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Miskolci Egyetem Egészségügyi Fôiskolai Kar; Miskolc
  2. Almási Balogh Pál Kórház, Központi Röntgen Osztály; Ózd
  3. Miskolci Egyetem, Egészségügyi Fôiskolai Kar, Borsod-Abaúj-Zemplén Megyei Kórház; Miskolc

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