Hungarian Radiology

[Neuroradiology, Which Way You Go? Roundtable Discussion at the 16th Congress of the Hungarian Society for Neuroradiology Debrecen, 27 October 2007]

BERÉNYI Ervin

DECEMBER 20, 2007

Hungarian Radiology - 2007;81(07-08)

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Hungarian Radiology

[International Congress of Radiographers - Malta]

VANDULEK Csaba, PAVLIKOVICS Gábor

Hungarian Radiology

[The 16th Congress and Postgraduate Training Course of the Hungarian Society for Neuroradiology Debrecen, 25-27 October 2007]

Hungarian Radiology

[Dental-CT imaging]

SZABÓ Tünde, BAGI Róbert, MONOKI Erzsébet, BANDULA Mihály

[Nowadays the widespread application of dental and oral surgical procedures and the use of dental implants established the need of special examination of the jaw. These implants are mainly made of metal and surgically imbedded into the edentulous jaw. Metallic artefacts deteriorate the diagnostic value of conventional X-ray. In the past years, the use of multislice CT technique and dental reformatting program can demonstrate structures which were hardly or not visible due to their shape and location. The aim of this review is to introduce this special dental CT program.]

Hungarian Radiology

[The history of the Department of Radiology at Szabolcs street hospital]

FORRAI Gábor, LAKI András, BOHÁR László, FORNET Béla

Hungarian Radiology

[Abdominal and thoracal manifestations of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder in children]

VÁRKONYI Ildikó, NYITRAI Anna, MAGYAROSY Edina, RÉNYI Imre, SZEBERÉNYI Júlia, KIS Éva

[INTRODUCTION - Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder is a secondary disease of transplanted patients, usually with good response to reduction of immunsuppressive therapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS - The lymphoproliferative disorder was diagnosed in four children among 139, renal, liver and lung transplanted patients. Clinical data (original disease, transplanted organ, age and time elapsed since transplantation at the diagnosis of the disorder) and imaging findings (chest X-ray, thoracal and abdominal computed tomography scans) were analysed retrospectively. RESULTS - Thoracal and abdominal forms were the most frequent manifestations of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder in our patients. Following features have been diagnosed on imaging studies: multiple liver nodules (two cases), multiple nodules in the renal parenchyma (two cases), splenomegaly (two cases), bowel wall thickening (two cases). Retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymph node enlargement was found in all patients. Thoracal manifestations were as follows: mediastinal lymphadenopathy (two cases), hilar mass (one case), multiple pulmonary nodules (one case). Renal rupture with perirenal hematoma in one case, hilar mass envolving the main bronchus in one case, hepatic abscesses necessitating drainage in one case, and bowel wall necrosis in one case were the complications of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder. CONCLUSION - Presenting symptoms are aspecific, often mimicking infection. Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder has to be excluded if aspecific symptoms in a transplanted patient are present, or the patient does not react properly on antibiotics. First step investigations include chest X-ray and abdominal sonography. Neck, chest and abdominal CT are mandatory for detecting all manifestations, for staging the disease and to determine the best localization of obligatory biopsy.]

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Late simultaneous carcinomatous meningitis, temporal bone infiltrating macro-metastasis and disseminated multi-organ micro-metastases presenting with mono-symptomatic vertigo – a clinico-pathological case reporT

JARABIN András János, KLIVÉNYI Péter, TISZLAVICZ László, MOLNÁR Anna Fiona, GION Katalin, FÖLDESI Imre, KISS Geza Jozsef, ROVÓ László, BELLA Zsolt

Although vertigo is one of the most common complaints, intracranial malignant tumors rarely cause sudden asymmetry between the tone of the vestibular peripheries masquerading as a peripheral-like disorder. Here we report a case of simultaneous temporal bone infiltrating macro-metastasis and disseminated multi-organ micro-metastases presenting as acute unilateral vestibular syndrome, due to the reawakening of a primary gastric signet ring cell carcinoma. Purpose – Our objective was to identify those pathophysiological steps that may explain the complex process of tumor reawakening, dissemination. The possible causes of vestibular asymmetry were also traced. A 56-year-old male patient’s interdisciplinary medical data had been retrospectively analyzed. Original clinical and pathological results have been collected and thoroughly reevaluated, then new histological staining and immunohistochemistry methods have been added to the diagnostic pool. During the autopsy the cerebrum and cerebellum was edematous. The apex of the left petrous bone was infiltrated and destructed by a tumor mass of 2x2 cm in size. Histological reexamination of the original gastric resection specimen slides revealed focal submucosal tumorous infiltration with a vascular invasion. By immunohistochemistry mainly single infiltrating tumor cells were observed with Cytokeratin 7 and Vimentin positivity and partial loss of E-cadherin staining. The subsequent histological examination of necropsy tissue specimens confirmed the disseminated, multi-organ microscopic tumorous invasion. Discussion – It has been recently reported that the expression of Vimentin and the loss of E-cadherin is significantly associated with advanced stage, lymph node metastasis, vascular and neural invasion and undifferentiated type with p<0.05 significance. As our patient was middle aged and had no immune-deficiency, the promoting factor of the reawakening of the primary GC malignant disease after a 9-year-long period of dormancy remained undiscovered. The organ-specific tropism explained by the “seed and soil” theory was unexpected, due to rare occurrence of gastric cancer to metastasize in the meninges given that only a minority of these cells would be capable of crossing the blood brain barrier. Patients with past malignancies and new onset of neurological symptoms should alert the physician to central nervous system involvement, and the appropriate, targeted diagnostic and therapeutic work-up should be established immediately. Targeted staining with specific antibodies is recommended. Recent studies on cell lines indicate that metformin strongly inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition of gastric cancer cells. Therefore, further studies need to be performed on cases positive for epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

Clinical Neuroscience

[What happens to vertiginous population after emission from the Emergency Department?]

MAIHOUB Stefani, MOLNÁR András, CSIKÓS András, KANIZSAI Péter, TAMÁS László, SZIRMAI Ágnes

[Background – Dizziness is one of the most frequent complaints when a patient is searching for medical care and resolution. This can be a problematic presentation in the emergency department, both from a diagnostic and a management standpoint. Purpose – The aim of our study is to clarify what happens to patients after leaving the emergency department. Methods – 879 patients were examined at the Semmel­weis University Emergency Department with vertigo and dizziness. We sent a questionnaire to these patients and we had 308 completed papers back (110 male, 198 female patients, mean age 61.8 ± 12.31 SD), which we further analyzed. Results – Based on the emergency department diagnosis we had the following results: central vestibular lesion (n = 71), dizziness or giddiness (n = 64) and BPPV (n = 51) were among the most frequent diagnosis. Clarification of the final post-examination diagnosis took several days (28.8%), and weeks (24.2%). It was also noticed that 24.02% of this population never received a proper diagnosis. Among the population only 80 patients (25.8%) got proper diagnosis of their complaints, which was supported by qualitative statistical analysis (Cohen Kappa test) result (κ = 0.560). Discussion – The correlation between our emergency department diagnosis and final diagnosis given to patients is low, a phenomenon that is also observable in other countries. Therefore, patient follow-up is an important issue, including the importance of neurotology and possibly neurological examination. Conclusion – Emergency diagnosis of vertigo is a great challenge, but despite of difficulties the targeted and quick case history and exact examination can evaluate the central or peripheral cause of the balance disorder. Therefore, to prevent declination of the quality of life the importance of further investigation is high.]

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Delirium due to the use of topical cyclopentolate hydrochloride

MAHMUT Atum, ERKAN Çelik, GÜRSOY Alagöz

Introduction - Our aim is to present a rare case where a child had delirium manifestation after instillation of cyclopentolate. Case presentation - A 7-year old patient was seen in our outpatient clinic, and cyclopentolate was dropped three times at 10 minutes intervals in both eyes. The patient suddenly developed behavioral disorders along with gait disturbance, and complained of visual hallucinations 20-25 minutes after the last drop. The patient was transferred to intensive care unit and 0.02 mg/kg IV. physostigmine was administered. The patient improved after minutes of onset of physostigmine, and was discharged with total recovery after 30 minutes. Conclusion - Delirium is a rare systemic side effect of cyclopentolate. The specific antidote is physostigmine, which can be used in severely agitated patients who are not responding to other therapies.

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Simultaneous subdural, subarachnoideal and intracerebral haemorrhage after rupture of a peripheral middle cerebral artery aneurysm

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The cause of intracerebral, subarachnoid and subdural haemorrhage is different, and the simultaneous appearance in the same case is extremely rare. We describe the case of a patient with a ruptured aneurysm on the distal segment of the middle cerebral artery, with a concomitant subdural and intracerebral haemorrhage, and a subsequent secondary brainstem (Duret) haemorrhage. The 59-year-old woman had hypertension and diabetes in her medical history. She experienced anomic aphasia and left-sided headache starting one day before admission. She had no trauma. A few minutes after admission she suddenly became comatose, her breathing became superficial. Non-contrast CT revealed left sided fronto-parietal subdural and subarachnoid and intracerebral haemorrhage, and bleeding was also observed in the right pontine region. The patient had leucocytosis and hyperglycemia but normal hemostasis. After the subdural haemorrhage had been evacuated, the patient was transferred to intensive care unit. Sepsis developed. Echocardiography did not detect endocarditis. Neurological status, vigilance gradually improved. The rehabilitation process was interrupted by epileptic status. Control CT and CT angiography proved an aneurysm in the peripheral part of the left middle cerebral artery, which was later clipped. Histolo­gical examination excluded mycotic etiology of the aneu­rysm and “normal aneurysm wall” was described. The brain stem haemorrhage – Duret bleeding – was presumably caused by a sudden increase in intracranial pressure due to the supratentorial space occupying process and consequential trans-tentorial herniation. This case is a rarity, as the patient not only survived, but lives an active life with some residual symptoms.

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A rare entity of acquired idiopathic generalised anhidrosis which has been successfully treated with pulse steroid therapy: Does the histopathology predict the treatment response?

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Acquired idiopathic generalised anhidrosis is an uncommon sweating disorder characterized by loss of sweating in the absence of any neurologic, metabolic or sweat gland abnormalities. Although some possible immunological and structural mechanisms have been proposed for this rare entity, the definitive pathophysiology is still un­clear. Despite some successfully treated cases with systemic corticosteroid application, the dose and route of steroid application are controversial. Here, we present a 41-year-old man with lack of genera­lised sweating who has been successfully treated with high dose pulse intravenous prednisolone. We have discussed his clinical and histopathological findings as well as the treatment options in view of the current literature.