Hungarian Radiology

[Mrs. dr. Háray Alfrédné]

MALÉTA Andrea

MARCH 20, 2006

Hungarian Radiology - 2006;80(01-02)

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Hungarian Radiology

[Summaries of the lectures on the 20th Sopron Ultrasound Days]

Hungarian Radiology

[Diagnostic pitfalls and artifacts of multislice CT]

BARANYAI Tibor

[There is a spectacular development in diagnostic radiology in the last one and a half decades. State-of-the-art US, CT and MR appliances and the dynamic software developments has improved diagnostic safety by order of magnitude, which resulted in the reduction of possible errors and misinterpretations. The advent of MSCT resulted in shorter scanning times, the submillimeter collimation and the subsecond scan time improves the spatial resolution of the image, the motion artifacts are reduced and the evaluation of the parenchymal organs improves. However, the new technology of MSCT raises new questions. Due to faster data collection the acquisition time decreases, that is why the tracing of the contrast material must be accurately timed. The high contrast material density that appears suddenly in pulsing vessels makes a disturbing effect on its environment, thus making way to erroneous interpretation. The performance of a secondary reconstruction (2D and 3D reconstructions) may diminish the possibility of diagnostic pitfalls and artifacts. Reconstruction increments made from appropriately overlapping thin slices are required for good image quality and spatial resolution, otherwise the image quality is deteriorating, some vessels might “disappear”, they are not depicted. We are struggling with several problems using MIP CTangiography. The proper elimination of the bones, the improper selection of VOI (volume of interest) might lead to false positive result, and the assessment of small vessels might become impossible. The differentiation of soft plaque and vessel thrombus can also be a problem, and the hard plaque may imitate a constriction. The knowledge of breath and pulsating motion artifacts, beam-hardening artifacts and flow-related artifacts is essential. Differentiating difficulties during virtual endoscopy, the partial volumen effect, the interpretation of various post-operative conditions, the disturbing effects of implants may cause diagnostic and differential diagnostic problems. The author gives a summary of possible errors, misinterpretations and artifacts that may occur with the application of MSCT even if examination protocols are followed.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Board meeting of the Hungarian College of Radiology]

PALKÓ András, FORRAI Gábor

Hungarian Radiology

[Oftex: “Doctors’ Continuous Postgraduate Education Electronic Index”]

MESTER Ádám, PALKÓ András

Hungarian Radiology

[The 20th Sopron Ultrasound Days - Review of the last 20 years]

BARANYAI Tibor

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Novel structured MRI reporting system in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy - issues of development and first use experiences

LAKATOS Andrea, KOLOSSVÁRY Márton, SZABÓ Miklós, JERMENDY Ágnes, BAGYURA Zsolt, BARSI Péter, RUDAS Gábor, KOZÁK R. Lajos

Purpose - To develop an evidence-based, standardized structured reporting (SR) method for brain MRI examinations in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) suitable both for clinical and research use. Materials and methods - SR template development was based on comprehensive review of the pertinent literature with the basic sections and subdivisions of the template defined according to MRI sequences (both conventional and diffusion-weighted, MR-spectroscopy (MRS), and T2*-weighted imaging), and the items targeted on age-related imaging patterns of HIE. In order to evaluate the usability of the proposed SR template we compared data obtained from the brain MR image analysis of 87 term and 19 preterm neonates with the literature. The enrolled 106 infants were born between 2013 and 2015, went through therapeutic hypothermia according to the TOBY criteria due to moderate to severe asphyxia and had at least one brain MRI examination within the first two weeks of life. Ethical approval was obtained for this retrospective study. Descriptive statistical analysis was also performed on data exported from the structured reporting system as feasibility test. Results - The mean gestational age of the study population was 38.3±2.2 weeks; brain MRI was performed on 5.8±2.9 day of life, hence in 78% of our patients after the conclusion of therapeutic hypothermia. Our main imaging findings were concordant to the pertinent literature. Moreover, we identified a characteristic temporal evolution of diffusion changes. Interestingly 18% (n=19/106) of the clinically asphyxiated infants had isolated axial-extraaxial haemorrhage without any imaging sign of HIE. Conclusion - In this article our approach of reporting HIE cases with our novel SR template is described. The SR template was found suitable for reporting HIE cases, moreover it uncovered time and location dependent evolution of diffusion abnormalities (and pseudonormalization, as well), suggesting its usefulness in clinical research applications. The high number of isolated intracranial haemorrhages, and the changing diffusion pattern emphasizes the importance of early imaging in HIE.

Clinical Neuroscience

The evaluation of the relationship between risk factors and prognosis in intracerebral hemorrhage patients

SONGUL Senadim, MURAT Cabalar, VILDAN Yayla, ANIL Bulut

Objective - Patients were assessed in terms of risk factors, hematoma size and localization, the effects of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) on mortality and morbidity, and post-stroke depression. Materials and methods - The present study evaluated the demographic data, risk factors, and neurological examinations of 216 ICH patients. The diagnosis, volume, localization, and ventricular extension of the hematomas were determined using computed tomography scans. The mortality rate through the first 30 days was evaluated using ICH score and ICH grading scale. The Modified Rankin Scale (mRS) was used to determine the dependency status and functional recovery of each patient, and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale was administered to assess the psychosocial status of each patient. Results - The mean age of the patients was 65.3±14.5 years. The most common locations of the ICH lesions were as follows: lobar (28.3%), thalamus (26.4%), basal ganglia (24.0%), cerebellum (13.9%), and brainstem (7.4%). The average hematoma volume was 15.8±23.8 cm3; a ventricular extension of the hemorrhage developed in 34.4% of the patients, a midline shift in 28.7%, and perihematomal edema, as the most frequently occurring complication, in 27.8%. Over the 6-month follow-up period, 57.9% of patients showed a poor prognosis (mRS: ≥3), while 42.1% showed a good prognosis (mRS: <3). The mortality rate over the first 30 days was significantly higher in patients with a low Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score at admission, a large hematoma volume, and ventricular extension of the hemorrhage (p=0.0001). In the poor prognosis group, the presence of moderate depression (39.13%) was significantly higher than in the good prognosis group (p=0.0001). Conclusion - Determination and evaluation of the factors that could influence the prognosis and mortality of patients with ICH is crucial for the achievement of more effective patient management and improved quality of life.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Tissue water content determination based on T1 relaxation time of water and quantitative cerebral 1H MRS at 3T using water as an internal reference]

FILE Györgyi, BAJZIK Gábor, DÓCZI Tamás, ORSI Gergely, PERLAKI Gábor, LELOVICS Zsuzsanna, ARADI Mihály, SCHWARCZ Attila

[Objective - Application of a quantitative MR-spectroscopic method for 3T clinical scanners based on tissue water content as an internal reference. Patients and methods - Six (22±2 yrs) volunteers were involved in the study. We performed T1 relaxation time measurements in a particular slice of the brain at 1T and 3T. Based on the validated water content measurement at 1T, the correlation of relaxation time T1 and water content was determined at 3T. The resulting water content served as internal reference for the quantification of localizated MRspectroscopic measurement. Results - At 3T our method resulted in 37.6±0.5 mol/l and 46.4±1.5 mol/l tissue water content in the white and gray matter, respectively. Calibration based on water content led to following metabolite concentrations: N-acetyl-aspartate 7.79±0.67 mmol/l; creatine 3.76±0.28 mmol/l; choline 3.68±0.47 mmol/l; myo-inositol 10.35±3.70 mmol/l in the white matter; and N-acetyl-aspartate 8.20±0.45 mmol/l; creatine 4.76±0.18 mmol/l; choline 2.64±0.35 mmol/l; myo-inositol 8.32±1.42 mmol/l in the grey matter. Conclusions - Tissue water content based on T1 value at 3T shows good accordance with gravimetric or other MR methods in the literature. Using it as an internal reference resulted in white matter metabolite concentrations that are in the range of previously published data. Comparing metabolite values of grey matter is more difficult because data in the literature substantially differ. The presented method is simple and easily applicable on any MR scanner without complicated correction and calibration steps.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Neurointerventional treatment of acute ischemic stroke: the Kaposvár experience]

RADNAI Péter, SZŐTS Mónika, RÁDAI Ferenc, HORVÁTH Gyula, VARGA Csaba, FOGAS János, SZÖRÉNYI Péter, HORVÁTH Zoltán, BAJZIK Gábor, MOIZS Mariann, REPA Imre, NAGY Ferenc, VAJDA Zsolt

[Aim of the study - In the present study, we report procedural and mid-term functional outcome data on the first 50 neurointerventional treatments of acute ischemic stroke in the Kaposi Mór County Hospital, Kaposvár, Hungary. Materials and methods - Endovascular recanalization of occluded large cervical and intracranial arteries was performed following an unsuccessful intravenous lysis or when intravenous lysis was contraindicated. A control cohort was retrospectively formed by analyzing data of 16 patients who has been unsuccesfully treated with iv. lysis before neurointervention was available in our hospital. Results and conclusion - Recanalization rate was 84% and major complication rate was 2% in the neurointerventional group. Mid-term good functional outcome, defined as mRS 0-2, was achieved in 44% in the neurointerventional and in 13% in the intravenous lysis group, after 11.5 and 39.7 months follow-up period, respectively. Subgroup analysis revealed patient age as the strongest predictive factor of good functional outcome. Our data shows that neurointerventional treatment of acute ischemic stroke gives substantially improved functional outcome, in accordance with the results of the recently published international randomized trials.]

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[Magnetic resonance measuring and analitic methods in epilepsy]

BARSI Péter

[Neuroradiology and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as its leading tool play a basic role in the diagnostics of epilepsy. The result of the MRI examination is of utmost importance in patients with therapy resistent focal epilepsy possibly requiring neurosurgical intervention. Based on the continuously developing MRI techniques, we can use an optimal imaging protocol. Cerebral structures can be evaluated on a microanatomical level on high-resolution images with thin slices. The three-dimensional (3D) sequence has high spatial resolution, properly distinguishes cerebral grey and white matter, provides the possibility of surface rendering and volumetry, as well as an anatomical basis for other methods like tractography, functional MRI and neuronavigation. Diffusion weighted and diffusion tensor imaging (DWI, DTI) and tractography has an important role in differential diagnostics and tractography visualizes the main white matter tracts and their relation with brain pathologies. MR perfusion (MRP) provides help in differential diagnostics and may have a future role in the determination of the epileptogenic focus in multifocal pathologies. MR spectroscopy (MRS) is important in differential diagnostics, lateralization of focal epilepsy and in the confirmation of hippocampal sclerosis. Several of these methods need special hardware, software and expertise, but the basic MRI protocol for epilepsy can be implemented in all modern MR scanners of middle or high field strength.]