Hungarian Radiology

[Jenő Forrai's intellectual heritage]

GÖBLYÖS Péter

AUGUST 20, 2003

Hungarian Radiology - 2003;77(04)

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Hungarian Radiology

[Our experiences with the use of phosphor plate X-ray system and PACS]

BARTA H. Miklós, BERENTEY Ernő, FORNET Béla, FORRAI Gábor

[In this study the experiences, the advantages and disadvantages of a full digital radiology department are presented. The conventional radiology and the spot films of gastroenterologic studies are exposed on phosphor plates since 1999 at our department. Two work-stations are used for making the reports and six viewing-stations are installed at distant departments. A central server organizes the data and pictures flow and the archive system consists of magnetooptical discs in a juke-box. The conventional X-ray methods are fully integrated in the system. The number of hardcopies is dramatically decreased. The clinicians may easily access the images on the viewingstations. Possibility of teleradiology and teleconsultation is integrated in the system. The quality of the examinations is improved and became uniform. The images of different methods (CT, fluoroscopy) are stored also in digital format. The disadvantages are the high cost of installation, a new workflow and reporting habits must be initiated. A problem of one element can cause the breakdown of the whole system. The new technics, the digital world forces us to develope and define new technical standards in order to obtain uniform quality.]

Hungarian Radiology

[40th Congress of the European Association of Pediatric Radiology Genova, 2-6th June 2003.]

KIS Éva

Hungarian Radiology

[Radial scar associated with lobular neoplasia in the breast]

ERDŐSI Éva, HERTELENDY Ágnes, GREXA Erzsébet, ANGA Béla, VARGA Zoltán

[INTRODUCTION - The authors are presenting the case of a 55-year-old female patient with breast abnormalities of unclear morphology. CASE REPORT - The lesion seen in the left breast was characteristic of radial scar in which, however, numerous, but not clearly benign microcalcifications were detected. During histological examination a radial scar associated with a small lobular neoplasia was diagnosed. However, these microcalcifications were not related to the malignancy. CONCLUSION - In radial scar extensive benign microcalcifications may develop. Nevertheless we should bear in mind that in 10-30% of cases this disorder can be associated with malignancy even without mammographic signs. The final diagnosis, however, should always be made on the basis of histological examination.]

Hungarian Radiology

[The congress of ESGAR was a success in Budapest]

MESTER Ádám

Hungarian Radiology

[Cheirospondyloenchondromatosis]

IGNYS Anna, MALGORZATA Krajewska-Walasek, MARIKOVA Olga, IVO Marik, KAZIMIERZ Kozlowski

[The term of cheirospondyloenchondromatosis (CHE) was coined by Spranger et al. This generalised, distinctive form of enchondromatosis is characterised by mild to moderate dwarfism, short hands and feet with beaded fingers, prominent large joints and frequently mental deficiency. Major radiographic features include generalised mild platyspondyly, generalised enchondromatosis with marked involvement of hands and feet and small ilia with eroded crests and acetabular roofs. We report three patients with this rare, severe form of enchondromatosis and stress some differences between our patients and the classical description of Spranger et al.]

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Lege Artis Medicinae

[Second game, 37th move and Fourth game 78th move]

VOKÓ Zoltán

[What has Go to do with making clinical decisions? One of the greatest intellectual challenges of bedside medicine is making decisions under uncertainty. Besides the psychological traps of traditionally intuitive and heuristic medical decision making, lack of information, scarce resources and characteristics of doctor-patient relationship contribute equally to this uncertainty. Formal, mathematical model based analysis of decisions used widely in developing clinical guidelines and in health technology assessment provides a good tool in theoretical terms to avoid pitfalls of intuitive decision making. Nevertheless it can be hardly used in individual situations and most physicians dislike it as well. This method, however, has its own limitations, especially while tailoring individual decisions, under inclusion of potential lack of input data used for calculations, or its large imprecision, and the low capability of the current mathematical models to represent the full complexity and variability of processes in complex systems. Nevertheless, clinical decision support systems can be helpful in the individual decision making of physicians if they are well integrated in the health information systems, and do not break down the physicians’ autonomy of making decisions. Classical decision support systems are knowledge based and rely on system of rules and problem specific algorithms. They are utilized widely from health administration to image processing. The current information revolution created the so-called artificial intelligence by machine learning methods, i.e. machines can learn indeed. This new generation of artificial intelligence is not based on particular system of rules but on neuronal networks teaching themselves by huge databases and general learning algorithms. This type of artificial intelligence outperforms humans already in certain fields like chess, Go, or aerial combat. Its development is full of challenges and threats, while it presents a technological breakthrough, which cannot be stopped and will transform our world. Its development and application has already started also in the healthcare. Health professionals must participate in this development to steer it into the right direction. Lee Sedol, 18-times Go world champion retired three years after his historical defeat from AlphaGo artificial intelligence, be­cause “Even if I become the No. 1, there is an entity that cannot be defeated”. It is our great luck that we do not need to compete or defeat it, we must ensure instead that it would be safe and trustworthy, and in collaboration with humans this entity would make healthcare more effective and efficient. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Early onset dementias: Case studies]

MERKLI Hajnalka, PÁL Endre, GÁTI István, KOSZTOLÁNYI Péter, KÖVÉR Ferenc

[Introduction - Dementia is a decline of intellectual abilities. The etiology of dementia syndrome is diverse. The authors describe three patients with early-onset dementia. Case reports - The first patient was a 44 years old male with mild gait, body ataxia, memory loss, slowness and apathy. Investigations proved AIDS dementia syndrome. In the second case of a 37 years old female patient, herpes simplex encephalitis was suspected due to sudden onset of speech arrest and to brain MRI and CSF findings. Her symptoms improved during antiviral treatment but later progressive dementia developed. CSF serological tests proved the presence of neurolues-dementia paralytica. The third patient was a 38-years-old female. Neurological examination was performed because of progressive memory loss, changed behaviour and impaired attention. Neuropsychological test showed severe dementia. Metachromatic leukodystrophy was proven by decreased arylsulfatase activity. Conclusions - It is not easy to recognize the early symptoms of dementia. In these cases, besides detailed history, neurological examination and neuropsychological tests, brain MRI and cerebral spinal fluid serological tests were indispensable for a correct diagnosis, especially in the young patients.]

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[Neuroprotection in brain ischemia - doubts and hopes]

ZÁDOR Zsolt, BENYÓ Zoltán, LACZA Zsombor, HORTOBÁGYI Tibor, HARKÁNY Tibor

[In ischaemic stroke the two major potential therapeutic strategies are aimed at either improving cerebral blood flow or directly interacting with the cytotoxic cascade - a large body of evidence gained from animal studies is in support of them. In clinical trials direct neuroprotection by blocking the neurotoxic cascade remained ineffective, although there are several clinical trials still in progress. We summarize the experimental data and present the results of clinical trials and also discuss why so many drugs, which were effective in animal studies, failed in human trials. It is emphasized, that 1. in most animal studies the reduction of infarct size, i.e. the amount of saved penumbral tissue, was the outcome measure, whereas neurological function remained unassessed; 2. the recovery of intellectual performance and higher cortical functions are of major importance in the future quality of life in stroke victims; however, it is impossible to examine these parameters appropriately in animal studies; 3. in many clinical trials the patient population was rather heterogenous and low in number, the study protocol was not optimal and the critical analysis of the subacute and chronic phase was lacking or insufficient. We present the major experimental stroke models, discuss their similarities, differencies and limitations as compared to the human pathophysiological processes. The pitfalls of extrapolating data from animal studies to clinical practice are also summarized. The complex network of functional and morphological intercellular connections, the long timescale of neurotoxic and reparative events and the lessons learned from clinical trials suggest, that the use of drug combinations (therapeutic cocktails) targeting multiple steps of the neurotoxic cascade would hopefully result in more effective treatment of ischaemic stroke. Strategies to facilitate brain plasticity and regeneration is an additional promising tool to enhance recovery in brain ischaemia.]

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[Our archaic heritage: the innate immunity. The cellular immunity of Drosophila]

ANDÓ István, LAURINYECZ Barbara, NAGY István, MÁRKUS Róbert, FLORENTINA Rus, VÁCZI Balázs, ZSÁMBOKI János, FEHÉR László, ELISABETH Gateff, DAN Hultmark, KURUCZ Éva

[Authors describe the essentials of the cellular immunity of Drosophila. They describe the Drosophila CD system, the main blood cell lineages and a blood cell differentiation model based on the expression of the CD antigens.]

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[CONSCIOUSNESS AND ALTERED CONSCIOUSNESS]

SZIRMAI Imre, KAMONDI Anita

[The notion of consciousness in the English scientific literature denotes a global ability to consciously perform elementary and intellectual tasks, to reason, plan, judge and retrieve information as well as the awareness of these functions belonging to the self, that is, being self-aware. consciouness can also be defined as continuous awareness of the external and internal environment, of the past and the present. The meaning of consciouness is different in various languages, but it invariably includes, the conscious person is capable to learn, retrieve and use information. Disturbance or loss of consciouness in the Hungarian medical language indicates decreased alertness or arousability rather than the impairment of the complex mental ability. Awareness denotes the spiritual process of perception and analysis of stimuli from the inner and external world. Alertness is a prerequisite of awareness. Clinical observations suggest that the lesions of specific structures of the brain may lead to specific malfunction of consciouness, therefore, consciouness must be the product of neural activity. “Higher functions” of human mental ability have been ascribed to the prefrontal and parietal association cortices. The paleocerebrum, limbic system and their connections have been considered to be the center of emotions, feelings, attention, motivation and autonomic functions. Recent evidence indicates that these phylogenetically ancient structures play an important role in the processes of acquiring, storing and retrieving information. The hippocampus has a key role in regulating memory, learning, emotion and motivation. Impaired consciouness in the neurological practice is classified based on tests for conscious behavior and by analyzing the following responses: 1. elementary reactions to sensory stimuli - these are impaired in hypnoid unconsciousness, 2. intellectual reactions to cognitive stimuli - these indicate the impairment of cognitive contents in nonhypnoid unconsciousness. Obviously, disturbance of elementary reactions related to alertness and disturbance of intellectual performance overlap. In conditions with reduced ability to react to or to perceive external stimuli the cognitive disturbance of consciouness cannot fully be explored.]