Hungarian Radiology

[Intraoperative intracranial ultrasound imaging in neurosurgery]

DOBAI József Gábor, GYARMATI János, SZÉKELY György, CSÉCSEI György István

OCTOBER 20, 2002

Hungarian Radiology - 2002;76(05)

[Diagnostic ultrasound imaging started in the 1940s. Up to the present it underwent on radical changes. Article briefly reviews the major steps of the development of ultrasound technique in neurosurgery, and possibilities of applications of different ultrasound methods in neurosurgery are described. Authors discuss their experiences with Hawk 2102 ultrasound system used in intraoperative procedures in 113 cases. Data compared with the literature. Conclusions are that use of intraoperative ultrasound in neurosurgery is modern and simple and it has various application fields. Intracranial lesions are well localized with its use, so the risk of operations decreases. Main disadvantages that ultrasound imaging requires bony trepanation and special transducers are needed for different lesions.]

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